Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Quackenbush Number 7
Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What is it?
  • Quackenbush airguns
  • No such luck!
  • Smart Shot
  • Some facts about the Number 7
  • Adjustable trigger!
  • Push-barrel
  • Sights
  • Summary

What is it?

What in the world is a Quackenbush Number 7 airgun? Well, for starters we aren’t talking about anything made by Dennis Quackenbush. No, we are looking at an airgun made by a distant cousin of his, Henry Marcus Quackenbush, of Herkimer, New York. He worked for the Remington Arms Company as his first job out of school, and, in 1871, started his own company under his name.

H. M. Quackenbush was a bright and gifted man who is credited with the invention of the nutcracker in 1878. The company he founded still exists under the name HMQ Metal Finishing Group and I believe are still in business today in Syracuse, NY. Look in your kitchen for those initials on your nutcracker.

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What is accuracy?: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The big question
  • Epic experiments!
  • Shooting Gibraltar
  • Use the best barrels
  • Rotate the barrel
  • Damage the bullets
  • Are bullets balanced?
  • Did Mann learn anything?

Chris USA suggested today’s topic last Friday, when he asked my about the tantalizing results I got from the Webley Mark II Service air rifle. Among his comments, he said this, “Perhaps the biggest thing to consider,… and maybe more accurate,…. it is just plain LUCK. Maybe, it is just the plain and simple fact as to how the pellets flew and just happened to be where they landed. So yea,… I would be interested hear your thoughts on what would appear to be sporadic anomalies.”

Among the “sporadic anomalies” he referred to was the last group, where 3 shots went into a tight cloverleaf and the other 2 were wild. What causes a rifle to do that — to put several shots so close together and then throw the others far away?

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Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Center aim
  • What to make of all of this?
  • Evaluation

Today is accuracy day for the Schofield Number 3 BB revolver. Lots of interest in this one, so let’s get started.

The test

I shot from 5 meters. I was seated and the revolver was resting on the UTG monopod. I used a 6 o’clock hold for most of the targets and I shot 6 shots at each target.

ASG Blaster BBs

First up were ASG Blaster BBs. Six of them made a vertical group that measures 1.579-inches between centers. It’s a lot larger than I thought it would be.

Schofield BB revolver ASG target
Six ASG Blaster BBs made this 1.579-inch group at 5 meters.

Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs

Next I loaded 6 Air Venturi Copper-Plated steel BBs into the cartridge noses and shot them. Again, the hold was 6 o’clock on the bull. These BBs went low and a little to the left, making a 1.488-inch group.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 13

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11
Part 12

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today Jack will start teaching Jamell, how to shoot a muzzle loading rifle.

Our guest writer is reader, Jack Cooper. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • A fowler?
  • Jamell Fowler
  • A refresher
  • Flintlock basics
  • Description
  • Loading sequence
  • Speaking of ramming
  • Priming sequence
  • Flash in the pan
  • Wet weather
  • Next

DANGER: Today’s topic talks about loading and shooting a black powder firearm. Black powder is explosive, even in the open. Be sure you know what you are doing before using black powder!

I went with Jamell to pick up the custom flintlock she ordered. It was part of a trade for one of her sculptures, and she took pictures of the clay rendering she had made to show to the gun maker. He was thrilled with her work, which will be an 18-inch bronze of a mountain man facing a grizzly bear. Apparently he will owe her some money plus the gun, but I stayed out of their business.

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Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • Let’s get started
  • Trouble at first
  • This comes with experience
  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we look at the velocity of the new Schofield Number 3 BB revolver. I also encountered a small glitch that will help some of you with your new CO2 guns. This should be an interesting report.

Let’s get started

I installed the first CO2 cartridge and found the Allen wrench in the left grip panel is very handy. I think I like that arrangement best of all, because the grip panel serves as a convenient handle for the wrench. I had the cartridge installed and the gun working in seconds, and yes, there was a drop of Crosman Pellgunoil on the cartridge tip.

Trouble at first

I cocked the pistol to fire it once, just to make sure the cartridge was pierced. But the hammer didn’t fall! This is a single action, so cocking the hammer is the only way to fire the gun. I played with the gun a few moments before discovering that the hammer had to be pushed forward slightly before the gun would fire. So then I cocked the hammer, pushed it forward slightly and then shot the gun like normal.

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MeoPro 80 HD Spotting Scope: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro 80 HD spotting scope from Meopta. Image provided by Meopta USA.

This report covers:

  • Bright and sharp
  • Not-so-smart phone
  • Real image
  • Second test at 200 yards
  • What’s next?
  • Photos through the scope

Today I will describe how the smart phone worked with the MeoPro 80 HD spotting scope. First I will report that the Permatex epoxy I used is holding fine. I took the spotting scope and smart phone adaptor to the range and it held the phone perfectly. So, that part works.

First I set up the scope on my Bogen medium-format camera tripod. It is rigid on that mount, which it has to be to see bullet holes in black bullseyes at 200 yards. And the Bogen tripod is as smooth as the scope, allowing perfect alignment with the target.

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A rare Quackenbush pistol comes to light

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • From Airgun Revue
  • Wes Powers find!
  • Toy pistol?
  • Powered by rubber bands

I had a glitch writing today’s historical blog, so I pulled in this one from the past. Oddly, Edith did the same thing when I was unconscious on a ventilator in the hospital several years ago. At any rate, it belongs in the historical section.

From Airgun Revue

The following appeared in Airgun Revue #6, which was published in 2000. While this blog is kind of short, I’ve always had a strange liking for this little pistol because it reminds me of the Haviland & Gunn pistol Edith found at a flea market for $5.

10-01-16-01
Over 125 years old, yet no one’s ever heard of this gun!

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