Teach me to shoot: Part 11

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today Jack will start teaching Jamell, how to shoot a muzzle loading rifle.

Our guest writer is reader, Jack Cooper. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • The mountain men
  • Black powder
  • Characteristics of black powder
  • Safety first
  • Possibles bag
  • Charging the rifle — step one
  • Charging the rifle — step two
  • Black powder grain sizes
  • Loading the ball
  • Ramming the ball home
  • Cap the rifle
  • Clean the bore
  • Finishing

Things have certainly taken a turn since I started teaching Jill to shoot. Now I’m teaching her friend, Jamell, how to shoot a muzzleloading rifle, to prepare her for the custom rifle she is having built. At least I thought it was going to be a rifle. Let me stop for a moment and bring you all up to speed on what it is that Jamell wants to do.

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How hard can it be?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Are old airgun parts really that simple to make?
  • It’s a simple plastic part
  • The question
  • Are old airgun parts really that simple to make?
  • It’s a simple plastic part
  • A fork in the road
  • Hold on!
  • Okay — stop!
  • But I only want to buy ONE!!!
  • The connection

We had a comment last Thursday that I had to turn into a blog report. A new reader named Don was asking about replacement grips for a Crosman Single Action 6 (SA-6) — a .22-caliber pellet revolver made from 1959-69.

Crosman SA-6
The Crosman SA-6 is a single action pellet revolver that resembles the Colt SAA.

Here is his question.

The question

“I have a Crossman “single Six” .22 cal. circa 1959? and it needs replacement grips. I was wondering if Ruger or Colt SA grips would fit? Going to use it for re-enacting and the plastic grips don’t cut it.
Thanks folks,
Glad I found your sight.
Don”

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Teach me to shoot: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today Jack starts teaching Jill’s friend, Jamell, how to shoot.

Our guest writer is reader, Jack Cooper. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • Getting started
  • Wants to hunt
  • Field trip
  • Watch the crowd
  • Etiquette lives!
  • High art
  • They do a deal — sort of
  • Diana the huntress
  • Big girl, big rifle
  • Next time at the range

I told you that I had promised Jill I would teach her friend, Jamell, how to shoot. Of course Jamell already knows how to shoot on several levels. She met Jill at a Babes with Bullets camp, where both of them took the Beginner Handgun course. So she not only knows how to shoot, she is also a recent graduate of one of the best training courses in the U.S. My job was to fill in the blanks that weren’t covered at the camp; subjects Jamell has never been formally taught.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

Before we begin, a word about the upcoming Texas Airgun Show. Remember, it’s Saturday, August 27 at the Arlington Sportsman Club in Mansfield, Texas. AirForce Airguns has decided to donate a Texan big bore as the door prize. Every paid attendee will receive a door prize drawing ticket as part of their admission and someone will win a new Texan big bore in their choice of caliber — .30, .357 or .45. How’s that for a reason to come to the show? Now let’s get to today’s blog.

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today, though, I’m changing it up. Instead of letting fictional guest writer Jack Cooper write, I am taking over. Jack asked me to show you how to get into position to shoot targets with a handgun, holding it with just one hand. This is the way he taught Jill, back in Part 4. Today is a very short and focused lesson, so let’s get started.

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Webley Senior straight grip air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Webley Senior straight grip
Webley Senior straight grip air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Design
  • Piston ring
  • Power
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Quirky

Today we start looking at a Webley Senior straight grip air pistol. This model was made from 1930 to 1935, according to the Blue Book of Airguns, 11th edition. There were two versions — a first version that has a trigger adjustment screw sticking out the front of the triggerguard and the second version, which is the one I have. I bought the pistol at a small gun show in Kentucky in the 1970s, when I was assigned to Fort Knox. I paid $75, which was considered a lot at the time, but I owned the first edition of the Airgun Digest and I knew what this pistol was. It’s worth a lot more today.

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Boxes — keep ‘em?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Love my job
  • Boxes everywhere
  • Good or bad?
  • Time adds value
  • Designing a box
  • Keep or not?

Love my job

I may have mentioned this before — I love my job! I get to handle and shoot airguns every day of my life, and I get to tell others about it. What’s not to like? Well, there may be one thing. Boxes.

My house is taken over by boxes. There isn’t a room in the house that doesn’t have at least one gun and one gun box. What’s that? You think my bathrooms are free? Think again. I bet I have the only guest bathroom in the world with an 1822 French horse pistol resting in the vanity drawer!

1822 French pistol
1822 French pistol. Guest bathroom, left side of vanity, second drawer down.

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MeoPro 80 the MeoPro 80 HD Spotting Scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro 80 HD spotting scope from Meopta.

This report covers:

  • Sometimes you just have to pay the price
  • So what?
  • My tale of woe
  • Meopta
  • The scope
  • Not a fair test
  • My evaluation

Today’s report is about a piece of equipment that has been central to my entire shooting career, yet one that has troubled and eluded me the entire time — a spotting scope. In fact, I have written about this subject before, through few of you probably remember.

Years ago I told you how I paid more than retail (in a trade) to wrest a Burris spotting scope away from a friend, after seeing how clear and sharp it is. That scope might have been the pick of the litter (it probably was) — performing well beyond the Burris spec for their $250 scope, but what do I care? It’s clear and sharp and lets me see tiny .22-caliber bullet holes in a black bullseye at 100 yards on a sunny day. In short, it does the job — sort of.

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