All guns are not accurate

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Could it be?
• Presumption
• The test target
• The Emperor’s New Clothes
• Behind the curtain
• The point

This report is for my wife, Edith. She has suggested it many times in the past few years. Today, I’ll try to address it.

Edith tells me that when she worked at a major sporting goods catalog sales company years ago, she was shocked by some of the questions their call center got. The most shocking was when someone would call and say they had just purchased a certain model of firearm and would the call center please tell them what ammunition it used? This didn’t happen just one time — it happened often enough that it made an impression on her.

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Talon SS versus Ruger 10/22: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Pellet guns versus rimfires
• The Talon SS
• The Ruger 10/22
• Why this test?
• Time to test the airgun and the rimfire
• The plan
• The point

Pellet guns versus rimfires
Today, I’ll begin a report that I’ve wanted to write for many years. How does a pellet rifle stack up against a popular rimfire? When I say, “stack up,” I’m referring to accuracy. The rimfire is still more powerful.

I’ve written many times that a good pellet rifle will bury a rimfire at 50 yards on a calm day. Now, it’s time to find out if that’s correct. Or can a rimfire hold its own?

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Buying and selling airguns on the internet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• The shyster dealers
• Weasel wording
• Bad photos
• How to spot an honest dealer
• Honest vs. dishonest: What’s the verdict?

The shyster dealers
Today, let’s start out talking about those internet dealers who are less than honest. I’m not talking about the scammers who are certainly out there. They’re the people with nothing at all to sell. All they want is for you to send them money, and you’ll never hear from them again.

I’m talking about the dealers who do anything to mislead you about the real airguns they’re selling. They have actual guns to sell, but they describe them in dishonest ways. I’ve dealt with a few and discovered a great many others, so this should be interesting. Remember, I’m primarily talking about buying guns on the Gun Broker website, though this does apply to most websites where selling takes place.

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Buying and selling airguns on the internet: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Tip 1: Commonly misspelled names
• Tip 2: Use an adjective
• Back to airguns
• Tip 3: What’s in a name?
• More

I’m going to address a question that several readers have asked about: How to buy used and vintage airguns over the internet. I’ve wanted to write this series for some time now. While I titled it “…on the internet,” a lot of what I’m going to say applies directly to Gun Broker — a large auction website. I use a tablet to browse this site anytime I am away from my desk and, shall we say, otherwise occupied? That time adds up for an old man!

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What I got for Christmas

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Good morning and Happy Day After Christmas. I thought today that we could all share some of the special gifts we got for Christmas. I know some of you don’t celebrate Christmas; but from the comments, I can see that many of you have been rewarding yourselves with holiday gifts, nonetheless. So, join in if you want.

My first gift
The first gift of the season was a Sears BB gun that’s an 1894 model made by Daisy. My brother-in-law, Bob, picked it up in an antique store. It doesn’t work, but I read online that these often do go bad after storage for several years. I’ll attempt repairs on my own; but if I’m not successful, I’ll probably get another working 1894, because I know many of our readers really love this gun. It was Daisy’s first Spittin’ Image BB gun, with production starting in 1961 and continuing until 1986. This variation was made for Sears from 1969 until 1973. One way or another, you’ll probably be reading a review of the 1894 Daisy in 2015.

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Best of B.B.: Remembering Smith & Wesson’s pellet pistols

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today is Christmas day, and I’m entertaining my family. Instead of writing a new report, I went way back in the archives and dug up something interesting from the past. This is about a pellet pistol (actually two, since they came in both .177 and .22)  that’s a beautiful replica of a firearm S&W made at the same time.

Remember, as you read this, I originally wrote it in 2005. And to all my readers to whom it applies — Merry Christmas!

Remembering Smith & Wesson’s pellet pistols

Pyramyd Air gets a lot of inquiries about vintage pellet and BB guns. While they sell the ammunition and gas needed for these guns, they don’t sell the guns, themselves, so the most commonly asked question is, “What’s it worth?”

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How and why guns wear out: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Introduction
• Firearms first
• Two factors to consider
• Metallurgy
• Design
• Summary

Introduction
I made the statement last week that some action pistols wear out with use, and it set off a huge round of discussion. Some owners have already experienced what I was talking about, and others were incredulous that their guns could ever wear out! Ever! Today, I want to begin a series that explores how and why airguns wear out — and believe me, some do.

Before you run screaming through the halls, shouting, “I knew it was too good to be true,” please leaven what you are about to read with some common sense. All airguns do not wear out in the ways I’ll describe. I’m looking at specific guns and types of guns, so factor that into what you read.

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