Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig P320 pistol
Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading
  • Is there a magnet?
  • Mag feed direction
  • Velocity
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Pellets — RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Yes, BB, but how fast is it?
  • The trigger
  • Evaluation

Today I test the velocity of the new Sig Sauer P320 pellet pistol. But before I get to that, I need to address loading the magazine. Some people find the 30-shot belt daunting to load because it doesn’t move easily for them. Sig sent me some additional instructions and a short video to describe the process.

Be sure to allow time for the video to upload! It might help to refresh the page.

Loading

To load the 320 magazine, the back cover is lifted up, giving you access to the pellet chambers that Sig calls “seats.” A pellet or BB is pressed into each of these, and because you are loading from the back, put the nose of each pellet in first — in the direction you want it to come out of the muzzle. BBs are spherical, so the orientation doesn’t matter. Let’s look at the video.

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Colt Peacemaker BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Colt Peacemaker
The new Colt Peacemaker is also available with ivory grips.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Backwards!
  • Fresh CO2
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • The test
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Plastic BBs
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Discussion
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Backwards!

Today we look at the Colt Peacemaker BB revolver with the 7.5-inch barrel. This test is the one I’m doing backwards. You will recall that I did Part 2 as an accuracy test, so today we look at velocity. That’s out of order but I think it won’t matter that much. Let’s get started.

Fresh CO2

Part of the velocity test is determining the shot count, so I removed the 12-gram CO2 cartridge and installed a new one. I knew the moment the cartridge was pierced because I heard it, so the test began with the first shot.

Air Venturi Steel BBs

First up were Air Venturi Steel BBs. Six of them averaged 413 f.p.s. The spread went from 407 to 421 f.p.s., so that’s just 14 f.p.s. After this first cylinder, however, all shots were slower. This was probably caused by part of the liquid CO2 coming through the valve and evaporating in the barrel.

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How many shots will an airgun get over its life?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Action airguns
  • Materials failure
  • Dielectric welding
  • Airguns with regulators
  • CO2 guns
  • Pneumatic airguns
  • Spring piston airguns
  • The lowly BB gun
  • But what is the number?
  • The point

This report is written at the request of reader redrafter. I made the title long, because it contains some things we need to think about. If an airgun is overhauled and gets new seals and springs, is that the end of its life? I don’t think so. What I am calling the end of an airgun’s life is when it no longer works and cannot be repaired with parts that are available. I say that because a careful worker can often extend the life of something beyond even that end. So, my definition of an airgun’s life is when there are no longer any repair parts that are easily available.

Action airguns

Let’s get these out of the way up front. Action airguns include the action pistols, submachine guns, revolvers and rifles that allow rapid fire like the Crosman 1077. As a class of airgun, these are the most likely guns to fail, and that is because of how they are intended to be used — i.e. rapid-fire most of the time. Within this group some guns have a reputation for early failure, while others, like the 1077, seem to last much longer than their synthetic materials would imply.

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Crosman’s M1 Carbine BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman M1 Carbine
Crosman M1 Carbine BB gun is a classic lookalike airgun.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Accuracy spoiler
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Results
  • Value
  • Summary

This is accuracy day for the Crosman M1 Carbine BB gun we are testing. I have tested this BB gun several times in the past, so I have a pretty good idea of what it can do, but there is always the hope that a new BB that hasn’t been tried will surprise us.

The test

I shot from 5 meters (16 feet 4 inches) using a UTG monopod rest to steady the gun. I was seated for this.

Daisy BBs

I have tested Daisy BBs in this gun several times in the past, so I didn’t test them again. The last time I tested them at 5 meters, I put 10 into 5.148-inches, with 9 landing in 1.354-inches. I think that one wild shot was a fluke and the 9 shots better represent what this gun will do with this BB. In fact, I learned something in this test that probably explains that wild shot. I’ll tell you about it in a moment.

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Crosman’s M1 Carbine BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman M1 Carbine
Crosman M1 Carbine BB gun is a classic lookalike airgun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Tom the doofus
  • Modern Quackenbush
  • The danger
  • A classic based on an icon!
  • Different valve
  • Repeater
  • Sights
  • More to come

Daisy may have given lookalike airguns the name “Spittin’ Image” but Crosman gave us the most iconic BB gun of all time — the M1 Carbine. Yes, I have written about this gun in the past. Now I’m getting it into the historical archives.

History

The M1 Carbine first came out in 1966. For all of that year and the next it had a genuine wood stock. These early variations are easy to spot because the sides of the stock are flat, since they were basically cut from boards. In 1968 Crosman began producing the gun with a synthetic stock they called Croswood, and production continued until 1976. Let me tell you — except for a plastic-y shine, Croswood is very realistic. In my opinion the Croswood stock makes the more attractive gun, because the stock is rounded and fully shaped.

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Long-range handgun shooting

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Sixguns
  • Artillery
  • A snubnosed .38
  • It’s easy!

I was asked to write this report, and I’m glad to do it. I made the statement that I shot Colt Single Action revolvers at 300 yards and apparently some readers were intrigued. Actually, that wasn’t the whole story, so today you’re getting the rest of it.

Sixguns

I acquired the book Sixguns by Elmer Keith when I was a stunt gunfighter at Frontier Village amusement park in San Jose California in the late 1960s. I was young and impressionable at the time, so I didn’t know that Elmer Keith was widely held to be a liar. He reported taking several long-range handgun shots that got him game and the couch reporters of the day didn’t believe him. But I did, so I tried what he wrote and discovered that it does work. I guess I’m a liar, too!

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A light report — the UTG Compact Defense LED light

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

UTG Compact Defense light
UTG Compact Defense light.

This report covers:

  • 2017 SHOT Show
  • Let’s get real
  • Description
  • Main power
  • Lower power
  • L.I.B.R.E.
  • Runtime
  • Defense
  • Come on, BB — a light?
  • Side clip
  • Where to get one

The power went out in my neighborhood last evening, about 11:30 p.m. This time it was serious, because it’s now 7:10 a.m. the next morning and there is still no sign of restoration. [Note: the power was restored at 7:50 a.m.]

Power here in Texas is pretty reliable because this state is off the national power grid, but when I lived in Maryland that wasn’t the case. Power on the Eastern seaboard is iffy at best. So the Pelletier household was always well-stocked with alternative sources of illumination. I became a flashlight fanatic and now own more than 50 sources of portable light, including the Victorinox Midnight Manager pocket knife that is my constant companion.

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