Umarex Throttle air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Throttle
Umarex Throttle offers a lot for a little money.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Long time
  • Good trigger
  • Nice scope
  • Handling
  • The test
  • JSB Exact RS
  • What to do?
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Something different
  • RWS Superpoint
  • What now?
  • Conclusion

I’m back. I said at the end of Part 3 that I wanted to test the Umarex Throttle air rifle at 25 yards and today is the day.

Long time

It’s been a long time since I shot the Throttle, so I had to experience it all over again. First I note that the rifle cocks easier (28 pounds) than the 16-18 foot-pounds of muzzle energy would normally require. Umarex engineers got that part right.

Good trigger

I do like the trigger. Though it feels heavier than I’m used to, it breaks crisply, which helps accuracy.

Nice scope

I found that I like the scope, although I had to adjust it for today’s test. Once the parallax was set I discovered that the eyepiece was way off for me. The crosshairs appeared double on the target. I unscrewed the eyepiece at least a quarter-inch and everything sharpened up. My aiming was precise from that point on. For a scope that comes in a bundled deal, this one is surprisingly nice.

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How does BB select pellets for a test?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Don’t I wish?
  • What’s the criteria?
  • Brands first
  • Choosing a pellet
  • Target guns
  • Action airguns
  • Hunting airguns
  • General purpose airguns
  • Trick pellets
  • How should you do it?

This blog was requested by reader Cobalt 327. And the answer is simple. BB gets paid by the pellet manufacturers to promote their products — the same as for the airgun manufacturers. The more they pay me, the more I talk about their pellets. I get a very healthy stipend from Crosman for writing about their Premiers, and from H&N for touting their Baracuda Match pellets. JSB actually sends me on all-expense paid vacations to the Bahamas several times each year, in addition to a very large check each month! Pocketa-pocketa-pocketa…

Don’t I wish?

I know that’s what some people think. There are no kickbacks that I am aware of in the airgun industry. If there are, whoever is paying them is fooling themselves, because we writers do this because we love it. I do get paid to write this blog, but no one tells me what to write and I have never been told to give a product anything but an honest report.

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Air Arms Galahad: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Galahad
Air Arms Galahad PCP in walnut is a striking looking air rifle!

UTG 8-32 SWAT Mil Dot
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

This report covers:

  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 5.53mm heads
  • Crosman Premiers
  • UTG 8-32 SWAT scope
  • Summary

This final report has taken two months to complete. I went to the range one time and shot the rifle at 50 yards, but the wind was blowing on that day and the groups were not good. I felt that was due entirely to the wind, so I needed to try it another day. It took me most of the time to get that second day — a combination of other business and a lot of windy Texas days!

Today I am reporting on the .22 caliber Galahad-rifle from Air Arms at 50 yards. Naturally I shot off a rest. The rifle was shot on power setting 4 (there are 5 settings) and I refilled after every second 10-shot group. Let’s get right to it.

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AirForce International Orion PCP air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Orion

The Orion PCP repeater from AirForce International.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • UTG Bubble Leveler scope
  • The test
  • Zero
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Trigger is spongy
  • Loading the magazine
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Evaluation so far

Today we start looking at the accuracy of the AirForce International Orion air rifle. Though I seldom compare airguns, we have discussed that this one is positioned against the Benjamin Marauder. This accuracy test should sharpen that focus.

UTG Bubble Leveler scope

The rifle needs a scope, so I mounted the best one I have — the UTG Bubble Leveler scope. This was the first time I looked through this scope since my cataracts were removed and — WOW! That bubble is bright, clear and apparent. Guys, if you’re having trouble seeing the bubble, schedule a visit with your eye doctor! The optics on this scope are the sharpest of any scope I own, and I cannot recommend it highly enough. This is a best buy and a world-beater!

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AirForce International Orion PCP air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

AirForce International Orion
The Orion PCP repeater from AirForce International.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Where to start
  • Magazine height
  • Load the mag
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Firing behavior and sound
  • We learn more
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Loading
  • Trigger pull
  • Power adjustability
  • Discussion

Where to start

Today we test the velocity of the AirForce International Orion. Many of you are new to precharged pneumatics (PCP), so let me show you how I select which pellets to test when I don’t know the airgun. I start by looking at the advertised velocity, which for this rifle in .22 caliber is said to be around 800 f.p.s. Knowing how AirForce states things like this, that number is obtained with a reasonable lead pellet, so I will guess it was a Hobby, though they might have shot something heavier. Still my velocities are going to be between 700 and 800 f.p.s. and that tells me I should start with medium weight lead pellets — something in the 13 to 16-grain range. Once we know more we can go from there.

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Apache-Fire-Ball-Texan: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

This is the completion of our guest blog on the Apache multi-pump air rifle. Today Benji-don shares his experiences with the performance of the rifle, after it was made operable.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Over to you, Benji-don.

Apache-Fire-Ball-Texan: Part 2

by Benji-don
Apache-Fire-Ball-Texan multi-pump pneumatic air rifle.

Apache Fire Ball Texan
Apache-Fire-Ball-Texan multi-pump pneumatic air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Trigger pull
  • Pumping
  • Loudness
  • Test for velocity and energy
  • Number 4 buckshot velocity
  • Daisy BBs velocity
  • Accuracy tests
  • Accuracy with BBs
  • Buckshot
  • Accuracy with BBs
  • Measuring #4 buckshot
  • Accuracy with airsoft BBs
  • Accuracy with .25 caliber pellets
  • Conclusions
  • From B.B.

Trigger Pull

I measured the trigger pull with a fish-weighing spring scale. It was 1 lb. 1 oz. It is one-stage with a long and creepy release. As much as I have shot the Apache, I still do not know when it will fire. That really requires holding on the target while squeezing the trigger.

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Diana 240 Classic:Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.


Part 1

This report covers:

  • BB’s eye
  • You liked it
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Hobby
  • Crosman Premier lite
  • The trigger
  • Trigger
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

BB’s eye

Just an update on my eye that had the cataract removed. It is now more acute at distance than the other eye. I see the doctor who did the surgery this Friday and am expecting that she will pronounce it fixed. I can now aim with open sights once more. Now, on to today’s report.

You liked it

Just an observation from the comments to Part 1 of this report. Many of you like this Diana 240 Classic air rifle for the same reasons I do. You like the small size, easy cocking and the general classic styling. Today we begin discovering how it performs, and I have to admit that I have high hopes. There aren’t enough airguns like this one in the market anymore, and I think that’s a shame. Because this is where the heart of airgunning lies — not in .22 rimfire power and accuracy, but with guns that are fun and easy to shoot.

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