Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 Sniper rifle combo.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This report covers:

  • Back to the Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper
  • A test of the new trigger adjustments
  • Many different holds
  • Try something different
  • Evaluation so far

Back to the Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper

Today we return to the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle, to see whether Bulldawg76′s trigger adjustment screws have any impact on accuracy. I don’t think they will, but I do think they will make it easier to shoot the rifle at targets. That will be a help by itself.

I am shooting off a rest at 25 yards. Naturally the artillery hold is being used. I’m resting the rifle on my off hand, back by the triggerguard

A test of the new trigger adjustments

I began where we left off in Part 5. The rifle is sighted-in and I selected the H&N Baracuda Match with 4.52mm head as the pellet to try. Boy — was I shocked when the first shot was a 10! For a few shots everything looked good, but then on shot number 6 the group opened up. By the time 10 shots had been fired the group measured 1.551-inches between centers. That’s very similar to the 1.422-inches I got with the same pellet before the trigger was adjusted.

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 Sniper rifle combo.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • New adaptor failed
  • Scope and mount
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.52mm head
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.53mm head
  • Overall evaluation

We are back with the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up combo today, looking at accuracy at 25 yards. We determined in Part 4 that the scope that comes with the package is unsuitable for the gun, so today I mounted a good scope on the rifle.

New adaptor failed

I was going to tell you about a new 11mm to Weaver adaptor today, too, but that part of the test failed when the scope fell off the rifle on the first shot. Since I am not sure how to mount this new adaptor, I’m not going to tell you who made it. I might have been the problem. I will converse with the manufacturer and see whether I did anything wrong.

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 MOBU Combo is an affordable breakbarrel with nice power.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Start at 10 meters
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.53mm
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • Crosman Premier 10.5-grains
  • JSB Exact Heavy 10.3-grain
  • 25 yards
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets at 25 yards
  • The feel of the gun
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up air rifle. We now know this is a powerful rifle that seems to have a smooth trigger. Let’s see if that means anything downrange.

Start at 10 meters

I started this test at 10 meters. Instead of 10-shot groups I fired 5-shot groups with each pellet. The only thing I’m trying to do is refine the sights and select the best pellets for further testing. All shooting today is off a rest (sandbag), using the classic artillery hold with the off hand touching the front of the triggerguard.

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Hatsan has potential
  • Hatsan is conservative
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Crosman SSP pellets
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Scope base
  • Summary

Man, did I ever bump the beehive with this report! Part 1 certainly got a rise out of a lot of you. And you said what was on your mind. I bet you are the kind of guys who would tell me that my dog is ugly, too.

Okay, I’m rooting for the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle that I’m testing. Why? Because according to the advertised specs, it puts out a little more power than an RWS 34 (remember — we aren’t calling them Dianas any longer), yet sells in this combo package for 50 dollars less than just an RWS 34P, by itself. If this rifle is accurate, we have a potential world-beater on our hands.

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Beeman R1 supertune: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R1
Beeman R1 Supermagnum air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Twitchy
  • The tune helped!
  • Important changes
  • Sight-in
  • No luck
  • One last group
  • Conclusions
  • New R1 book next year

Today will be interesting, because today we will see the Beeman R1 in a new light. At least I now do.

Twitchy

In Part 3 I told you that my R1 has always been a twitchy rifle to shoot accurately. Even when I wrote the R1 book, I had problems getting this rifle to shoot at any distance. Ten meters was easy, but beyond 20 yards the rifle just didn’t like to put them all together. But in every group of 10, 4 or 5 would be in a single hole — indicating the airgun wants to shoot. When I encounter an air rifle like that I call it twitchy, because it really needs the right hold to do its best. The problem is — I hadn’t found that hold for this rifle yet.

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Beeman R1 supertune: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R1
Beeman R1 Supermagnum air rifle.

Part1
Part2

This report covers:

  • New tune more accurate?
  • A nondescript scope
  • Various holds
  • The R1 wants to shoot!
  • Air Arms domes
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • The rifle’s feel
  • Where are we?

Today I start testing my tuned Beeman R1. The R1 has always been a twitchy spring rifle for me. I have gotten some good groups and I have also failed miserably. The rifle is not at fault, because it can stack pellets on top of one another — at least at 25 yards. But it is super sensitive to small variations in the hold. In fact, this R1 I am testing for you is the one that inspired the artillery hold, two decades ago.

New tune more accurate?

Is the rifle easier to shoot accurately, now that it has been tuned? No so far. It’s still very sensitive to slight variations in the hold, as I learned in this session.

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How does H&N make pellets?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

How does JSB make pellets?

This report covers:

  • Improvements at the molecular level
  • Pellet shapes and head sizes
  • No lookie!
  • Process management
  • More than just pellets
  • Olympic target pellets
  • Testing
  • Cleaning
  • Quality assurance and packing
  • On to shipping
  • Summary

Back on August 10 we looked at how JSB makes pellets. Today we will look inside the H&N factory and see how they do it.

Improvements at the molecular level

“If we want to improve the making of pellets, we have to do it at the molecular level.” Those words were spoken to Dr. Robert Beeman when he toured the H&N factory in the 1980s. As a major buyer of their product, Dr. Beeman got to look inside the operations of manufacturers like Haendler & Natermann Sport GMBH (H&N). They told him at that time that with all the technical controls on the process of making pellets, any future improvements would have to come at the molecular level.

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