Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder synthetic stock
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This report covers:

  • What we are testing today
  • Rifle is now adjusted perfectly
  • Removed the UTG folding stock adaptor
  • At the range
  • Changing pressure doesn’t change POI
  • More fun
  • Bottom line

We are looking at a .25-caliber gen 2 Benjamin Marauder with synthetic stock that I purchased specifically for this extended test. Dave Rensing of R. Arms Innovations send me a modular stock to test, and I attached a number of Leapers UTG parts to it. Read the earlier parts of this report to see what’s been done so far.

What we are testing today

Today we will look at accuracy with the rifle installed in the modular stock. You may recall what I’m about to say, but I will summarize for those who haven’t been following and don’t like to read the earlier parts of the report. I found the accuracy was only good in the RAI modular stock, but it was superior in the factory synthetic stock. I noticed a dense rubber pad in the synthetic stock and right away readers started talking about using dense material to bed rifle actions. But my discoveries did not end there.

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Air Arms S410 TDR precharged pneumatic pellet rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Arms TDR rifle
Both side of the Air Arms S410 TDR.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Airgun Academy videos are back!
  • The test
  • Here we go
  • Notice what is happening
  • Shooting at higher power
  • Still tipping
  • Conclusion

Airgun Academy videos are back!

The Airgun Academy videos are back and number 35 — The artillery hold — is ready to be viewed!

Look for more videos each week. Now let’s get to today’s report.

Today I take the Air Arms S410 TDR Classic out to 100 yards, to see if the accuracy we saw at 50 yards in Part 4 continues. This will be an interesting report for all who think that going from 50 to 100 yards means simply doubling the size of the groups.

You really should read Part 4 again, because that was where I finally learned how the test rifle wants to be operate and what pellet it likes best. When I started today’s 100-yard test, the rifle was set exactly as it had been for 50 yards and I was careful to fill it to 2900 psi with the Air Venturi G6 hand pump.

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Air Arms S410 TDR precharged pneumatic pellet rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Arms TDR rifle
Both side of the Air Arms S410 TDR.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Pumping the gun has changed
  • Three magazines or two?
  • First group
  • Second group
  • On to different pellets
  • JSB Exact Jumbo heavies
  • Two more pellets
  • Back to the Air Arms domes
  • Is this a 100-yard air rifle?

Today we are back at the range with the Air Arms S410 TDR Classic. The last time we saw that the TDR groups shifted with every magazine. We also learned that this rifle likes the 16-grain Air Arms dome on high power. Today I want to see the full range of this pellet, plus test the potential of a couple other .22 caliber pellets.

Pumping the gun has changed

I reported in Part 2 that it took 94 pump strokes to get to 2900 psi after 40 shots had been fired. If you read that report you’ll see that I shot the rifle 10 times more after knowing it had fallen off the power curve. That was a total of 40 shots on a fill, but that’s not how I’m shooting the TDR today. I’m shooting 20 shots per fill, and I note that the number of pump strokes to refill the gun has dropped to around 60.

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Air Arms S410 TDR precharged pneumatic pellet rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Arms TDR rifle
Both side of the Air Arms S410 TDR.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The G6 pump has a luminous dial!
  • Many things to test
  • The point of the test
  • Third group
  • Analysis of the first series
  • High power
  • Air Arms dome
  • End of the test

Today we take the Air Arms S410 TDR Classic to the range. If you recall, I got good stable velocity with the power selector set on medium power, so I left it set that way for this test.

The G6 pump has a luminous dial!

You may also recall that I am filling the TRD with an Air Venturi G6 hand pump. I do that because the TDR has an Air Arms proprietary fill adaptor that nothing else fits, so I attached it to the G6 for this test. The velocity test suggested there may be as many as 30 good shots from a fill to 2900 psi, and filling the rifle to that pressure isn’t hard to do. But the morning I was at the range I discovered something curious. The G6 pump I’m using has a dial that glows in the dark!

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Beeman R1 supertune: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R1
Beeman R1 Supermagnum air rifle.

Part1

This report covers:

  • Cocking effort
  • Really bronze?
  • Don’tcha wanna know how it works?
  • Crosman Premiers
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • RWS Hobby
  • Custom muzzle brake
  • Trigger pull
  • New safety easier to operate
  • Summary

I was pleased to see so many readers got something from the first part of this report on the tuneup of my Beeman R1 rifle. Several of you commented on how much work Bryan Enoch had put into the gun, and I think that is an important thing to take away. You have seen guest bloggers and even me tune spring guns over the years, but never to the degree that Bryan devoted to this rifle. That just illustrates that there are all levels of things that can be done to a spring piston air rifle, and you can pick and choose what you want to do and what you want to spend doing it. What you see in this report is a top tune.

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The advantages of hunting with an airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a guest blog about the advantages of airgun hunting by Pyramyd Air employee Derek Goins.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, over to you, Derek.

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Space
  • Noise level
  • Cost
  • Versatility
  • Some things to consider…

Introduction

Like a Carhartt-clad stone I sat motionless against a large oak tree, a rifle braced on my knees. The reluctant morning sun was just peeking into the horizon, bringing relief from the swirling fall winds biting at the back of my neck. A rain the night before left the ground soggy, the moist air heavy with the smell of earthworms and rotting leaves. Earwigs and tiny beetles fled through the humid dirt as I shifted my feet in an attempt to thaw my toes.

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Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Aeon 8-32X50 scope
Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • First group
  • Power increased
  • Gun refilled
  • Last group
  • Results — wait a minute!
  • Conclusion

Today is the second part of the 50-yard test on the Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle, where I change the power of the scope to see whether the point of impact (POI) changes. You may remember last time the results were somewhat vague. Today we will double the number of groups shot under the same conditions to see if changing the scope’s power changes the POI.

The test

The test was to shoot two 10-shot groups at 50 yards with the scope set on 32 power and two 10-shot groups with the scope set on 14 power. I filled the rifle to 3000 psi and shot off a rest with the scope set on 14 power. No scope adjustments were made during this test — either last time or this time. The pellets I used are the same JSB Exact Jumbo 15.89-grain domes that were used in the first test.

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