Talon SS versus Ruger 10/22: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Ruger 10/22 rimfire rifle
  • AirForce Airguns Talon SS
  • The test
  • The results
  • Bottom line
  • The surprise
  • A goldmine of data!
  • The results

This report tested the relative accuracy of an AirForce Talon SS against a Ruger 10/22 rimfire. I went to the range several times to shoot all the 10-shot groups I needed, so it took some time to get to today’s report.

I had a preconception of how accurate a Ruger 10/22 was, and I knew very well how accurate an AirForce Talon SS was. I figured the Ruger didn’t stand a chance against the air rifle. If I’d used any of the standard Ruger 10/22s I have shot up to this point, things would have worked out as I expected.

Ruger 10/22 rimfire rifle

But the rifle I used in this test was chosen because it surprised me with its accuracy. I got it in trade at a gun show and was surprised when I saw how well it shot. In fact, it was the accuracy of this rifle that inspired this test to begin with. I have owned a number of 10/22s and shot many others; but until this rifle came along, I’d never seen a standard Ruger right out of the box that shot this well.

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • The bullets
  • At the range
  • Velocity with Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets
  • Tin Starr 103-grain semi-wadcutter
  • A funny thing happened
  • 158-grain .358 semi-wadcutter
  • How loud is it?
  • Trigger-pull
  • New bullets to try
  • Thanks to Pyramyd Air
  • Evaluation so far
  • One last thing

Time to let the Bulldog bark! Today, I’m testing the Benjamin Bulldog velocity with a couple different rounds. And some interesting things happen!

As I said in Part 1, the Benjamin Bulldog is not a rifle you can test indoors. Even with its shroud, it has to be loud, so I waited to test it at my outdoor rifle range. Also, I would never test an airgun this powerful in my house.

The bullets

The Bulldog is listed as a .357-caliber rifle, so I took several different bullets for this test. Crosman sent me several boxes of their 145-grain Benjamin Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets, which are lead bullets with a red polymer tip that forms a pointed nose. I knew they were great big bore bullets from when I tested the Rogue.

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Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

• How quiet?
• Stronger pellet trap
• Fills with a probe!
• First pellet — Benjamin domes
• Let’s talk
• You make the call
• Next up — the JSB Exact King pellets
• Beeman Kodiak pellets
• Bullets
• Trigger-pull

How quiet?
I felt like a new airgunner because I didn’t know what to expect from the .25-caliber BT65 QE air rifle. I was planning on taking it to the range the next morning, but if I could shoot it safely in my office without blowing out the windows, I could save some range time that was sorely needed for other tests. It all came down to just how quiet this Quiet Energy precharged pneumatic really was.

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Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

• Bullpup
• Shrouded
• Bolt action with sidelever
• Detailed specifications
• Bullets
• Sling swivel studs
• Sights
• The trigger
• Barrel cleaning
• Rotary magazine

Today’s report should start some discussions! I’m starting the review of the Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle. Big bores are very popular these days, and we have a number of them to review this year.

Bullpup
If you read Part 1 of the Ft. Worth airgun show last September or Part 1 of the 2015 SHOT Show report in January of this year, you’re aware that the Benjamin Bulldog is a .357-caliber big bore from Crosman, and it’s built in the bullpup style.

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Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE air rifle

This report covers:

• Today’s rifle is different
• BT65 rifle specs
• Let’s talk price
• Quattro trigger
• Automatic safety
• Circular clip
• My plans for this test

Okay, back to work. Let’s start a look at Hatsan’s powerful precharged pneumatic air rifle (PCP) — the BT65 QE. I know this rifle has been out there awhile, but I just reviewed the AT44-10 Long QE last July, so I’m slow all around. That rifle was so accurate at 50 yards that I took it out to 100 yards — something I seldom do.

Today’s rifle is different
But today’s rifle is different. It looks very similar to the AT44-10, and it’s a 9-shot repeater (in .25 caliber, 10 in .177 and .22). But the BT65 is more powerful. It’s also very long, though that adjective is missing from the title. In short — this is the big one. I ordered it in .25 caliber because I have something special I want to do with it. But more on that later.

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Talon SS versus Ruger 10/22: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Pellet guns versus rimfires
• The Talon SS
• The Ruger 10/22
• Why this test?
• Time to test the airgun and the rimfire
• The plan
• The point

Pellet guns versus rimfires
Today, I’ll begin a report that I’ve wanted to write for many years. How does a pellet rifle stack up against a popular rimfire? When I say, “stack up,” I’m referring to accuracy. The rimfire is still more powerful.

I’ve written many times that a good pellet rifle will bury a rimfire at 50 yards on a calm day. Now, it’s time to find out if that’s correct. Or can a rimfire hold its own?

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Things you need when you buy a PCP

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Equipment to fill the gun
• Silicone chamber oil
• Diver’s silicone grease
• Plumber’s tape
• No such thing as Teflon tape
• A chronograph tells the whole story
• Other things?
• Summary

Today, I’m writing this for the sales representatives at Pyramyd Air, who are always asked what else you’ll need when you buy a precharged airgun. Precharged airguns need some things to go with them to operate smoothly. Think of  the batteries you always need for electronics. Are they included in the box or do you have to buy them extra?

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