Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

    • First test at 25 yards
    • Sight-in
    • H&N Baracuda Match 4.53mm
    • Baracuda Match 4.50mm
    • H&N Baracuda Match 4.52mm
    • H&N Sniper Magnum
    • Shot count
    • JSB Exact Heavy
    • Evaluation so far

    Today we begin to look at the accuracy of the Hatsan Gladius long. Gladius, Maximus — I must have missed the memo that said 2016 is the year for Roman names.

    First test at 25 yards

    I decided to shoot the first test indoors at 25 yards. That would familiarize me with the rifle and also allow me to test the potential of several pellets. I mounted a UTG 10X50 Accushot SWAT scope on the rifle because it seems to compliment the bullpup styling. It’s short, yet plenty powerful for those longer shots I’m going to take. And it comes with UTG mounts that have a Weaver base to fit the rail on top of the Gladius receiver. So mounting went quick, because the scope was already in the rings.

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Benjamin Maximus: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • $100 PCP
  • What is the Maximus?
  • Finish
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Dual fuel?
  • 2,000 psi
  • Differences
  • Yet to come

Okay — this is the report you have been waiting for. Today we begin looking at the Benjamin Maximus precharged pneumatic (PCP) air rifle. The rifle I’m testing is in .177 caliber, but they also come in .22 at the same price. They are available for sale, too, so the game is on.

$100 PCP

Two years ago Dennis Quackenbush and I experimented with the most inexpensive PCP we could envision. I called it the hundred-dollar PCP, and you might remember the series, Building the $100 precharged pneumatic air rifle. It was an experiment that we hoped would get people both thinking and talking. Well, it certainly did! One dealer was already selling a PCP for $100 that he was converting from a CO2 rifle. When he ran out of the initial supply of rifles, though, the price jumped to around $180, I believe.

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When the fix is so simple it’s difficult to see

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The start
  • Owner’s manual a bust
  • Here he comes to save the daaaaay!
  • Duhh
  • Call a real man
  • Once upon a time…
  • … presto!
  • Manuals and aftermarket support
  • Analysis of the problem

Most days my blogs come from tests of airguns, ammunition and shooting equipment. They are straightforward and unfold in familiar ways. But ever so often a blog idea jumps up in my lap and licks my face like an excited puppy. That describes today’s report.

The start

It all started about 3 weeks ago when I went to fill my carbon fiber air tank, using my high-pressure Omega Supercharger compressor. I flipped the start switch and the fan came on but not the water pump. The Omega Supercharger is water-cooled and has numerous safety features built in. One of them is the compressor pump will not operate if the water pump is not on. That’s so the compressor pump will always be cooled — a reliability feature.

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Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • Quiet
  • A couple things
  • High Power
  • Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Low power
  • Medium power setting 4
  • What to make of this?
  • Trigger pull
  • Accuracy
  • Evaluation

We’re back with the Hatsan Gladius .177 long today for the velocity test. Hatsan advertises that this rifle gives up to 90 shots per fill. You may get that many, but not on full power. This is a hunting rifle and you want hunting rifle accuracy. For me that means keeping all your shots inside an inch which is the size of the kill zone on the smaller game the Gladius is designed to take. Now, when you throw distance into the equation things get confused very fast, so my way to simplify things is to say that 50 yards is the distance at which I would like to see one-inch groups.

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FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB P44
FWB P44 target pistol is Tom Gaylord’s dream airgun!

FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 1
FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 2
FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 3
Morini 162MI Part 1
Morini 162MI Part 2
Morini 162MI Part 3

This report covers:

  • A test of 2 target pistols
  • P44 benefits
  • Today’s test
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Vogel pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Match pellets
  • RWS R10 Pistol
  • Results

Today we start testing the accuracy of the FWB P44 10-meter target pistol. Normally I test accuracy one time and then either end the series or move on to other things, but in this report I want to show you something different. I’ll start doing that today. I spent time adjusting the pistol to fit me perfectly in Part 3, and now I will take some time discovering which pellet is the best for the gun. So there will be several accuracy sessions before I finish this series.

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Welcome, fellow Jedi!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Back in the day
  • Parallax
  • Twist rate and rifling styles
  • Velocity versus accuracy
  • Oh, how far we have come!

I was going to show you a brand new spotting scope today, but something came up that I want to address. I don’t always respond to your comments these days — there are simply too many of them for me to cover. But I at least scan all of them and I read many of them.

Yesterday it dawned on me as I was reading the comments – many of you are ready to take your test to become full-fledged Jedi knights! A few may even go on to become Jedi masters. Well done, my enthusiastic Padawan learners!

Whenever I write about a technical subject I cringe, thinking of all the questions it will bring. That used to be bad, because I had to answer each any every question myself. But that isn’t the case anymore. I have been following conversations between Bulldawg76, GunFun1 and ChrisUSA and I am amazed at the level of expertise being displayed. I remember when each of them first started commenting on the blog, and they don’t seem like the same people anymore.

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The power band of a precharged airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Difference between a precharged airgun and a multi-pump
  • Balanced valve
  • Benjamin 700
  • Benjamin 710
  • Benjamin 600 Automatic
  • How a PCP valve works
  • Run out of barrel
  • Power band = 1000 psi?
  • The power curve
  • Why don’t they…?
  • What should you do?
  • Last tip — worth the price

The topic for today’s report comes from reader GunFun 1, who asked me to discuss the useful power band of a precharged pneumatic (PCP). Some of you are thinking about getting into PCPs and you wonder how they work. Today’s report should clarify some of that for you.

Difference between a precharged airgun and a multi-pump

I’ll start with the main difference between a multi-pump and a PCP. A multi-pump like the Benjamin 392 that many of you are familiar with, fills with air that you pump in manually. It all gets exhausted with the one shot, or at least it is supposed to. Fill with many pumps and then exhaust all at once — that’s something many airgunners know.

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