Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

  • Eun Jin pellets
  • Predator Polymag pellets
  • JSB Exact King pellets
  • Bottom line

This is the final test of the Hatsan BT65 QE. I’ve enjoyed working with this rifle. Once I got the silencer issue sorted, the gun became quite accurate. Today, I’ll try some other pellets, and I’ll also try a group at 100 yards. The silencer parts are still out of the shroud, so there’s nothing to hinder the flight of each pellet.

Eun Jin pellets

I tried the 35.8-grain .25-caliber Eun Jin dome first. Because of the rotary magazine, I was concerned this long pellet might not fit, but it did. It fit fine. And it cycled through the action without a fault. But accuracy was a different story.

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • Pellets
  • H&N Grizzly pellets
  • JSB Exact King 35 pellets
  • Velocity for the King
  • Air Venturi round nose bullets
  • Velocity for the round nose
  • One more trip to the range?

Benjamin Bulldog Tom on bench
This was a good day to test the new Benjamin Bulldog.

I spent another day at the range with the Benjamin Bulldog .357 air rifle. The day was calm, but that doesn’t matter as much when you’re shooting a big bore.

I think I’ve decided what the Bulldog is best suited to do. Besides being a very handy rifle for medium-sized critters like coyotes and javelinas, the Bulldog is a wonderful big bore for general plinking. I know that a lot of airgunners buy big bores without thinking of the use they’ll put them to, and plinking seems to be the top choice; but most guns are not suited to a lot of shooting. They use too much air and constantly have to be topped off. The Bulldog will give you 10 good shots on a filll and with the right ammo, it seems like the ideal big bore to plink with.

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Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

  • First group
  • Problem solved
  • A good start
  • Benjamin domed pellets
  • Beeman Kodiak Match pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Back to the JSB pellets
  • What about the silencer?
  • Conclusions

I’ve wanted to get back to this .25-caliber Hatsan BT65 QE for a long time. Today, I’ll tell you what happened. I wasn’t satisfied in part 3 that I was seeing the best accuracy this rifle could produce at 50 yards, even though there were some okay 9-shot groups. This big PCP has the reputation for shooting better than it did, and I wanted to see that; so I removed all the silencer parts and went back to the range.

Over the years, I’ve had problems with airgun silencers — starting with a Daystate Mirage in the late 1990s that just didn’t hold up at 50 yards. When its silencer was removed, that rifle suddenly tightened up and shot like it was supposed to; and that’s what made me aware that airgun silencers are tricky things. When they work, they do so beautifully, and you never know they’re there. But if anything touches the pellet before it leaves the muzzle, all accuracy is destroyed.

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • Tin Starr Bullets
  • Tin Starr 101-grain SWC
  • Air management
  • Tin Starr 108-grain truncated cone
  • Air Venturi round ball
  • Eun Jin 9mm domed pellets
  • Tin Starr 128-grain round nose
  • Back to the Tin Starr 101-grain SWC
  • Velocity
  • More to come

Thanks for being so patient on this report. I last looked at the Benjamin Bulldog .357 big bore air rifle on April 2. April was a very busy month for me and I had to put all trips to the range on hold. But I’m back in the saddle now, and there will be more tests of this Bulldog, as well as a couple accuracy tests of the Hatsan BT-65, which was also left hanging.

Tin Starr Bullets

The good news is that, while I was busy, Johnny Hill of Tin Starr Bullets made me a bunch of new bullets. I like his bullets because they’re pure lead and very soft. That seems to make a difference when it comes to accuracy. Last time, I tried his bullets that were sized 0.356, but today I’ll show you what they do at 0.357 inches. The difference is dramatic!

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • Scoped rifle
  • Feel of the rifle
  • Tin Starr bullets
  • Pellets are next
  • Degassing the Bulldog
  • Trigger-pull
  • What comes next

Scoped rifle

Today, I’ll take the Benjamin Bulldog to the range to try it on targets for the first time. Crosman sent me a Centerpoint 4-16X56 scope and rings for the rifle, so they were mounted before I went to the range.

Benjamin Bulldog scoped
Centerpoint 4-16X56 is sized nicely for the Bulldog.

This is the first time I have seen this particular Centerpoint scope. Pyramyd Air doesn’t carry it because it’s brand new and won’t be commercially available until later this year. I like 4-16x scopes anyway, and this one’s bright. The duplex reticle has mil-dots on both lines and appears to be etched glass. The crosshair is fine, but the mil-dots make it easy to find. The parallax focus is on the left side, where it is handy for adjustment. All in all, a nice scope!

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Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE air rifle

This report covers:

  • Uh-oh!
  • Shooting dynamic
  • Benjamin domed pellets
  • JSB King pelletss
  • Tried the solid bullet
  • The plan

I have quite a report for you today on the accuracy of the .25-caliber Hatsan BT65 QE precharged air rifle. This is a rifle I’ve long wanted to test because of its reputation for power and accuracy at a great price. Twenty-five caliber air rifles have become legitimate hunting guns over the past decade, mostly because of the improvements in pellets. It’s now worthwhile to think of a .25 instead of a .22 if all you want to do is hunt.

Uh-oh!

I actually went to the range a week earlier to test the rifle, but no matter which pellet I tried, the best it would do was about 5 inches at 50 yards. This rifle is really too powerful to test inside my house, so I skipped any 25-yard testing. Pellet after pellet went into large groups. I felt there had to be something wrong with the test rifle. Rather than report on a failure at the range, I contacted Hatsan, which sent me a link to one of Rick Eutsler’s videos on improving the accuracy of the rifle. After watching that video, I removed the barrel from the rifle and found that its crown had some damage.

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Talon SS versus Ruger 10/22: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Ruger 10/22 rimfire rifle
  • AirForce Airguns Talon SS
  • The test
  • The results
  • Bottom line
  • The surprise
  • A goldmine of data!
  • The results

This report tested the relative accuracy of an AirForce Talon SS against a Ruger 10/22 rimfire. I went to the range several times to shoot all the 10-shot groups I needed, so it took some time to get to today’s report.

I had a preconception of how accurate a Ruger 10/22 was, and I knew very well how accurate an AirForce Talon SS was. I figured the Ruger didn’t stand a chance against the air rifle. If I’d used any of the standard Ruger 10/22s I have shot up to this point, things would have worked out as I expected.

Ruger 10/22 rimfire rifle

But the rifle I used in this test was chosen because it surprised me with its accuracy. I got it in trade at a gun show and was surprised when I saw how well it shot. In fact, it was the accuracy of this rifle that inspired this test to begin with. I have owned a number of 10/22s and shot many others; but until this rifle came along, I’d never seen a standard Ruger right out of the box that shot this well.

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