Posts Tagged ‘R.A.I. adjustable AR stock adapter’

Crosman 2240 conversion to air: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 2240 conversion to air: Part 1
Crosman 2240 conversion to air: Part 2
R.A.I. Adjustable AR Adapter for Crosman 2240 pistols: Part 1
R.A.I. Adjustable AR Adapter for Crosman 2240 pistols: Part 2

WARNING: This conversion changes the operation of the pistol to use air at up to three times the pressure it was designed for. The parts that are installed are strong, but there are other parts in the gun that aren’t changed and could fail when subjected to the higher pressures. Pyramyd Air advises anyone making such a conversion to exercise extreme caution.

Crosman 2240 air conversion long barrel
The steel breech and longer barrel increase the 2240′s length dramatically.

This report covers:

• Installation of a steel breech and longer barrel
• Easy steps
• First velocity test
• Crosman Premier pellets
• RWS Hobby pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• What have we learned?
• Replace the striker spring with a heavier spring
• Crosman Premier pellets
• RWS Hobby pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• Evaluation to this point

This is the third look at converting a Crosman 2240 CO2 pistol to run on high-pressure air. In the last report, we saw how the conversion works with the factory barrel and factory striker spring. Today I will install a longer barrel with a steel breech and see what that does. Then I will add a stronger striker spring and see what that does.

Installation of a steel breech and longer barrel
Installing a Crosman steel breech and a Crosman 14.50-inch barrel on the 2240 pistol took all of 10 minutes. Four screws were removed, and both the plastic breech and barrel came off. After the detailed disassembly you saw in Part 1 of this report, this modification was a walk in the park.

Easy steps
The new breech was made by Crosman and sold by Pyramyd Air for $38, plus shipping. The barrel was also made by Crosman, and I bought it off eBay for $37 plus shipping. Together, these two parts have added about $85 to the cost of the gun, on top of the $65 for the air conversion that was given to me by Rick Eutsler. That’s an additional $150 I’ve put into this gun. And I’m not counting the adjustable stock and adapter that turns this pistol into a carbine. I’m not complaining about the cost, but don’t let anyone say this is a cheaper route than buying a Benjamin Discovery outright. What you get with this conversion is the time you need to make the investment. You can do this in easy steps.

First velocity test
I left the factory striker spring in place for this first test and pressurized the pistol to 2000 psi. Then, I shot the same 3 pellets I’ve been testing all along:

14.3-grain Crosman Premier pellets
11.9-grain RWS Hobby pellets
14.5-grain RWS Superdome pellets

Below are the velocities on CO2 for the factory gun; then the velocities for the factory gun with the high-pressure air conversion; and finally the velocities for the gun with the steel breech, longer barrel and factory spring — all operating at 2000 psi.

Crosman Premier pellets
CO2 avg…………..Air in factory gun average…………..Air in long barrel average
448 f.p.s…………………..486 f.p.s………………………………………517 f.p.s.

I got 15 shots with this pellet and the longer barrel. They ranged from 504 f.p.s. to 524 f.p.s.

RWS Hobby pellets
CO2 avg…………..Air in factory gun average…………..Air in long barrel average
482 f.p.s…………………..526 f.p.s………………………………………564 f.p.s.

This pellet gave me 18 shots from a 2000 psi fill with the longer barrel. They ranged from a low of 548 f.p.s. to a high of 573 f.p.s.

RWS Superdome pellets
CO2 avg…………..Air in factory gun average…………..Air in long barrel average
455 f.p.s…………………..483 f.p.s………………………………………525 f.p.s.

Superdomes gave 14 shots on a 2000 psi fill. With the longer barrel, the low was 516 f.p.s. and the high was 534 f.p.s.

What have we learned?
Obviously, the pistol shoots faster with the longer barrel and no other changes. Adding the steel breech does strengthen the rear of the barrel, but it doesn’t add anything to velocity.

All 3 shot strings posted above started out slow and increased as the shots were fired. So, the pressure curve is about ideal when the fill is at 2000 psi.

The velocity increase from CO2 in the standard pistol to high-pressure air in the longer barrel is very significant. But by leaving the factory striker (hammer) spring in the gun, we’re not getting all this conversion has to offer.

Replace the striker spring with a heavier spring
The kit Rick Eutsler sent me contained two striker springs — both of which are stronger than the factory spring. I removed the factory spring and installed the spring that was the weakest of the two, though stronger than the factory spring. I wanted to keep the fill pressure at 2000 psi, and the strongest spring would not be the way to do that.

I filled the gun to 2000 psi and proceeded to shoot Crosman Premiers. Here are the first 8 shots.

581
577
576
575
578
576
570
568

The velocity dropped with almost every shot. Yes, there are a few exceptions, but the trend is generally down. What this means is that the new spring is too strong for the fill pressure of 2000 psi. The pistol wants to start at a higher pressure with this spring.

I decided to fill the gun to 2250 psi. This is above the maximum I wanted to use, but it illustrates the relationship I just mentioned and is worth a look. Let’s look at the velocities at this pressure.

Crosman Premier pellets
588 f.p.s. average, low 582 f.p.s., high 594 f.p.s.

Compare the above to the average velocity with the factory striker spring and longer barrel, which was 517 f.p.s. This is a huge increase of 71 f.p.s. The stronger striker spring gives more of a boost than the longer barrel by itself. But — and understand this — without the longer barrel, the stronger spring would only waste more air. This is a modification that requires all the components to work together. You can’t just pick one item and be done with it.

RWS Hobby pellets
640 f.p.s. average, 632 f.p.s. low, 646 f.p.s. high

The remarks are the same for Hobbys as they are for the Premiers.

RWS Superdome pellets
590 f.p.s. average, 580 f.p.s. low, 596 f.p.s. high

Same remarks apply to this pellet as to the others.

All three pellets gave me maximum shot strings of 10 shots when set up this way. Obviously, more air is being used and the volume of the reservoir has remained the same.

Evaluation to this point
We’ve taken this Crosman 2240 pistol from one power on CO2 to a much higher power with high-pressure air, a longer barrel, a stronger spring and a steel breech. These modifications cost a total of $150 over the cost of the initial pistol ($60). Is it worth it?

The answer will depend on who’s talking. Some shooters enjoy putting their hands on the parts of their airguns and making their own creations. Others look at the total investment and just want something that shoots well for the least amount of money. This 2240 modification is not for the latter group, because we still have to add a $60 RAI adapter and a $60 UTG Adjustable Stock. That brings the cost of the gun we’re modifying to a total of $330.

The next step is to try this modification for accuracy. For that, I’ll attach the adapter and stock, again. I think it has to be tested to at least 25 yards with a scoped gun.

Crosman 2240 conversion to air: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 2240 conversion to air: Part 1
R.A.I. Adjustable Adapter: Part 1
R.A.I. Adjustable Adapter: Part 2

WARNING: This conversion changes the operation of the pistol to use air at up to three times the pressure it was designed for. The parts that are installed are strong, but there are other parts in the gun that aren’t changed and could fail when subjected to the higher pressures. Pyramyd Air advises anyone making such a conversion to exercise extreme caution.

Crosman 2240 air conversion
My Crosman 2240 has been converted to operate on high-pressure air.

This report covers:

• Where we are
• Before filling the first time
• Shooting the gun
• Crosman Premier pellets
• RWS Hobby pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• What comes next

Let’s look at what the conversion to air did for the Crosman 2240. Boy, was there ever a lot of discussion on that report! I think this may be one of the all-time most popular subjects on this blog.

Where we are
Here’s where I am with this subject. The 2240 is now converted. I plan to test it with 2,000 psi air today, and I do not plan to go higher. This is a test of what’s out there and some of the things that can be done with a 2240, but I’m not in the business of hotrodding this pistol. Many other folks are doing that very well; so, if you are interested in what’s possible, read what they have to say.

Today, I’m going to test the pistol with the conversion but with the stock striker spring still installed. In other words, if you simply screwed the tube into the gun and did nothing else (the front sight still has to come off to clear the tube), this is what you’ll get. I did change the face seal, which is why I disassembled the pistol in the previous report; but that wasn’t strictly necessary, since I am pressurizing to only 2,000 psi. I did it just to show how the entire kit is installed.

Before filling the first time
Before filling the gun, which is now done through the male Foster nipple on the end of the air tube, I put several drops of silicone chamber oil into the fill nipple. It came to me bone-dry, and I wanted all the seals inside the unit to get a coating of this oil. Then, I connected the gun to my carbon fiber air tank and slowly filled it to 2,000 psi. I say slowly, but as small as this air tube/reservoir is, it fills pretty fast. It probably took only 15-20 seconds to fill it all the way. You want to go as slowly as as possible to keep heat from building.

When I bled the air connection in the hose, the inlet valve in the air tube remained open and all the air bled out. So, I refilled it and bled it a second time. This time, it sealed as it should — thanks to the oil, I believe.

Shooting the gun
It was now time to test the gun. I had no idea what it was going to do, but I left my hearing protection off to hear if the first shot was loud. It wasn’t. Perhaps the gun is a little louder than it is when using CO2, but the difference is not that great. Of course, I used eye protection for the chronographing session, because the pellet trap is so close. I use a trap with duct seal to keep the rebounds down and the noise to a minimum.

Crosman Premier pellets
The first pellet I tested was the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier dome. I should add that I shoot only the pellets from the cardboard box, which is why I link to them, only. We were informed several months ago that Crosman planned to stop selling Premiers in the cardboard box and I stocked up on them. But I see they’re still available.

Back in 2010, I did a test of the CO2 2240 pistol, so I have the recorded velocities for this exact pistol on CO2. It averaged 448 f.p.s. with Crosman Premiers. On 2000 psi air, the first shot was 468 f.p.s. It increased to a maximum of 492 f.p.s. by shot 7 and dropped back to 466 f.p.s. by shot 15. At the end of the string, the gun was still holding 1200 psi of air pressure. The average velocity of 15 shots was 486 f.p.s., which means air boosted the average velocity of this pellet by 39 f.p.s.

RWS Hobby pellets
Next up were 11.9-grain RWS Hobby pellets. When the pistol was running on CO2, these pellets averaged 482 f.p.s. On 2000 psi air, they started at 515 f.p.s. and increased to 537 f.p.s. by shot 9. The velocity droped back down to 511 f.p.s. by shot 16. The average velocity for this string of 16 shots was 525 f.p.s. — a 43 f.p.s. increase on air. The remaining pressure was 1200 psi, once again.

RWS Superdome pellets
The final pellet I tested was the 14.5-grain RWS Superdome. When the pistol ran on CO2, Superdomes averaged 455 f.p.s. On 2000 psi air, they started at 470 f.p.s. and drifted up to 495 f.p.s. by shot 7. They dropped back down to 467 f.p.s. by shot 16. The average velocity was 483 f.p.s., an increase of 28 f.p.s. over CO2.

Notice that the gun performs similarly, regardless of what pellet was tested. The curve starts out slow, builds to the maximum quickly and then drops back to the starting point just as quickly. The three pellets gave a total shot count of 15, 16 and 16, respectively.

What comes next?
I can’t test the pistol for accuracy as it is right now because the front sight has no clearance to be re-installed. And the plastic 2240 receiver does not have a scope base on the receiver. Decision time.

I could get a steel breech for the 2240 from Pyramyd Air. While it will not accept the 2240 rear sight, it does have 11mm dovetails for a scope. That’ll work with the barrel that’s on the gun right now; but if I get a longer barrel, I’ll get a little more velocity from this same setup. So, I ordered a 14.5-inch barrel from an eBay vendor.

There are a number of different ways this can go with these parts, so I will wait to see what seems best once I have them.

Crosman 2240 conversion to air: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

R.A.I. Adjustable AR Adapter for Crosman 2240 pistols: Part 1
R.A.I. Adjustable AR Adapter for Crosman 2240 pistols: Part 2

This report covers:

• What this is
• Thanks to Rick Eutsler
• Step-by-step instructions
• How hard is it?

Today, I’m starting a fresh and different look at the Crosman 2240 air pistol. You may have noticed that I linked to the R.A.I. adjustable shoulder stock adapter at the beginning of the report. That’s because my plan is to convert the 2240 to operate on high-pressure air and test it again as a small PCP carbine. And, I might add, not only is it small, it’s also affordable if done in stages.

WARNING: This conversion changes the operation of the pistol to use air at up to three times the pressure it was designed for. The parts that are installed are strong, but there are other parts in the gun that aren’t changed and could fail when subjected to the higher pressures. Pyramyd Air advises anyone making such a conversion to exercise extreme caution.

What this is
What we are looking at today is a device that is so simple, yet apparently effective that many will slap their foreheads and wonder why they didn’t think of it themselves. It’s a drop-in device that changes the operation of a 2240 pistol from CO2 to air. It appears very simple, but there’s some disassembly and parts-swapping involved, so that’s what I’m going to show you today.

What’s happening is that you’re dropping a high-pressure air cartridge into the space where a CO2 cartridge would normally go. And if that was all there was to it, we would be done. Just remove the CO2 cap, remove the empty cartridge, slide the unit in and screw it tight against the face seal. But there’s the rub. The face seal in a 2240 is not designed for high-pressure air. So, we have to substitute a different face seal, and that’s where the disassembly comes in.

Thanks to Rick Eutsler
This conversion was suggested to me by Rick Eutsler, who appears with me on American Airgunner. He thinks a lot of it and wondered if I’d tried it, yet. No, I hadn’t. So he sent me a device. The device is made and sold by PowerMax-HiPAC.com. This one I am testing sells for $65, according to their website, but there are many other configurations and accessories available. I’ll focus on just this one for now, and we’ll see where it takes us.

Before starting the conversion, I removed the CO2 cartridge. Then, I removed the UTG 6-Position Mil-Spec Stock Assembly and the R.A.I. adapter that connects it to the pistol. The gun was now in its factory configuration, and the conversion could begin.

 Crosman 2240 air pistol stock removed
The R.A.I. adapter and UTG adjustable stock were removed from the 2240.

Crosman 2240 air pistol air tank
The air tank (bottom) goes into the 2240, replacing the CO2 cartridge and end cap. The tank is threaded just like the end cap. The face seal inside the gun must also be changed, so disassembly is necessary.

What follows is a step-by-step disassembly and replacement of the face seal. The work is easy, but some of the parts are small — and you have to exercise caution to keep from losing them. Note that I did my work on a dark wool blanket. The wool keeps parts from moving, and the dark color allows me to use flash photography without the dark parts appearing black. If a white background were used, that’s what would happen.

Step 1. Remove front sight
The front sight is knocked off with a wood block and rubber hammer. The sight isn’t attached by fasteners, so it comes off with a light tap.

Crosman 2240 air pistol front sight off
A wood block was placed against the rear base of the front sight and tapped with a rubber hammer to remove the sight.

Step 2. Remove barrel band
The barrel band is held by Allen screws, top and bottom. Loosen both, and the band slides off the gun.

Crosman 2240 air pistol barrel band off
Loosen the screws of the barrel band and slide it off.

Step 3. Remove rear sight
The rear sight is held by a single screw that’s one of two holding the end cap to the action. Take it off, and the end cap is almost ready to come off the gun.

Crosman 2240 air pistol rear sight off
Remove the rear sight by removing one screw.

Step 4. Remove grips (optional)
The grips come off next. This step isn’t necessary; but if you want to see all the working parts inside the grip, you can do it.

Crosman 2240 air pistol remove grips
Each grip panel is held on by a single screw. There isn’t a lot to see.

Step 5. Remove end cap
Remove the rear grip frame screw, and the end cap will come off the gun. There’s a powerful spring pushing against the cap, so contain it as you remove this screw or the end cap will go flying.

Crosman 2240 air pistol remove end cap
When the rear grip frame screw is removed, the end cap and mainspring are free. Contain the end cap or it’ll go flying.

Step 6. Remove grip frame
Now the front grip frame screw is removed, and you can separate the frame from the action tube. Be very careful in this step not to lose the tiny spring and ball detent for the safety — it rests in the left side of the grip frame.

Crosman 2240 air pistol remove grip frame
Remove the front grip frame screw and lower the frame from the action tube. Be careful not to lose the safety spring and ball detent that are in the grip frame.

Crosman 2240 air pistol safety spring and detent
The safety spring and detent ball are very small. They are not under tension when the grip frame comes off; but if you turn the frame upside-down, they’ll fall out.

Step 7. Remove receiver from tube
At this point, just a single screw holds the receiver and barrel to the action tube. That screw is located in the pellet trough and is very small (I believe it’s an .050, but it may be larger). Unscrew this screw, and the receiver and barrel can be separated from the tube.

Crosman 2240 air pistol remove action screw
Remove this screw, and the action and barrel lift off the tube.

At this point, you can remove the barrel from the action. It isn’t required; but if you do, you’ll see where the transfer port fits in the bottom of the barrel.

Crosman 2240 air pistol barrel
If you slide the barrel from the receiver, you can see the machined spot where the transfer port fits.

Step 7. Remove gas transfer port
After the barrel is off the tube, the steel transfer port will be exposed. It usually stays with the tube, but nothing holds it except the seal in the valve. This small part is how the compressed gas (or air, when we convert the pistol) moves from the valve into the barrel to push the pellet. So, it’s very important.

Crosman 2240 air pistol transfer port
The steel transfer port usually stays with the tube when the barrel’s removed. If not, don’t lose it.

The transfer port has two lengths to it — a long side and a short side. The short side fits into the seal in the valve that’s still in the tube, while the long side goes into the underside of the barrel.

Crosman 2240 air pistol transfer port detail
The short side of the transfer port goes into the tube and into the seal in the valve. The long side goes in the bottom of the barrel.

Crosman 2240 air pistol transfer port seal
The transfer port seal is shown here. You see the brass valve body under it.

Step 8. Remove striker
Next, remove the striker — or what many call the hammer. It’s held in place by a small pin that must be lifted out, then the striker will come out the rear of the tube. This pin connects the bolt to the striker and is how the gun is cocked.

Crosman 2240 air pistol striker pin
To remove the striker, first remove the striker pin. There’s an enlarged hole at the rear of the cocking slot through which the pin is lifted out.

Crosman 2240 air pistol striker out
Once the striker pin is out, the striker slides out the rear of the tube.

Step 9. Remove valve screw and valve body
Remove the screw holding the valve body in the tube. When it’s out, the valve will slide out the rear of the tube. I pressed it lightly with the barrel to start it, but some valves may take a little coaxing depending on how long they’ve been in the gun — but it isn’t difficult to remove this part.

Crosman 2240 air pistol valve screw
Remove the one valve screw.

Crosman 2240 air pistol valve body
The valve body slides out the rear of the tube.

Step 10. Exchange the face seals
Now we come to the place where the face seals are exchanged. The light-colored seal is for CO2 cartridges and is too soft for the air pressure we’ll be using. It must be pried out of the end of the valve, and the black seal that’s supplied with the air conversion kit should be installed in its place. Getting the new seal in is much like buttoning a shirt collar with small buttons. The new black seal will also work with CO2; so if you want to convert back, you can skip this teardown and just remove the air tank.

Crosman 2240 air pistol valve face seal
Here’s how the face seal looks before you pry it from the valve body.

Crosman 2240 air pistol valve 2 face seals
Here’s the factory face seal (lighter one on left) and the new seal to be installed. Notice that continual use has made a groove in the factory face seal.

How hard is it?
It took me a total of 20 minutes to disassemble the pistol, and that includes taking the pictures seen here. It isn’t hard, but there are places where caution should be exercised.

Assembly is the reverse of disassembly, and there are no special tips. Just make certain that the bolt will engage the striker pin when you assemble the action, and make sure all the seals are properly seated.

That’s it for now. Next time, I’ll put air into the pistol and chronograph the results.

R.A.I. Adjustable AR Adapter for Crosman 2240 pistols: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

stock extended
The UTG stock is attached to the Croswman 2240 with the adapter and extended as far as it will go.

This report addresses:

• Crosman 2240 pistol is accurate!
• Sight-in reveals a tip!
• Accuracy testing
• Summary

Today, I get to shoot the Crosman 2240 air pistol as a carbine. Thanks to the adapter from R. Arms Innovations and the adjustable UTG 6-position Mil Spec AR stock, my 2240 is now a handy carbine. Allow me to explain why that’s such a good thing.

2240 is accurate!
Many years ago, when I knew much more than I do now, I wrote an article for Shotgun News about some vintage air pistols — specifically the Crosman Mark I Target pistol and the Smith & Wesson 78G. Both vintage air pistols have superb handling and light, crisp triggers, not to mention their fine adjustable sights. I was writing about how the golden age of target air pistols had ended 30 years earlier, and I included a Crosman 2240 pistol in the article, just for comparison. You know — so people could see how far things had slipped over time. Imagine my chagrin to see the 2240 turn in the best results of the test, despite having a much cruder trigger and sights that were as simple as a door latch. I wrote the article that way, admitting my surprise that the current gun bested the two golden oldies, despite lacking all of their sophistication.

Sometimes, I think of myself as the Charlie Chaplin of writers. I’m always doing things my readers know will explode in my face, and I guess it’s funny to watch — or, in this case, read. Anyhow, the Crosman 2240 rubbed my nose in it real good that time!

We now have a chance to let the 2240 sprint like the thoroughbred that it is. The peep sight that comes on the pistol could not be used when it was a pistol; but with this adjustable stock attached, it can now come into play.

One more thing I learned in today’s test. I thought I had the stock adjusted perfectly when we began. It was set up for the Benjamin Marauder pistol that has a scope mounted on it, and what I didn’t consider when switching over to the 2240 was how far my eye would be from the peep hole. Fortunately, the UTG stock adjusted one more click in, and then the peep sight was in the right place. That’s why an adjustable shoulder stock is better than a stock of fixed length when you’re trying different air pistols like I am.

Sight-in
One reason you read this blog is the occasional tip you get. Well, today’s the day! The 2240 uses a standard rear sight that has a peephole on the same plate as the notch. Simply flip the plate over (you have to take it off the sight to do this), and the peep is available. It isn’t a precision target aperture, but neither is the peep sight on a Garand, M1 Carbine or M16, for that matter.

crosman 2240 rear sight
The rear sight has both a notch and a peep hole. They adjust in both directions, but the adjustments are somewhat crude. Loosen the screw and slide the plate up and down for elevation. For windage, the entire sight slides a little side-to-side.

You adjust elevation by sliding the peephole up and down — always moving in the direction you want the shot to move. There is also some sideways adjustment by sliding the whole rear sight side-to-side, but it’s not much. On my gun, it didn’t go far enough. This is where the tip comes in!

If you can’t move the rear sight, maybe you can move the front, but on the 2240 the front sight is fixed. Ahh…but the barrel isn’t fixed! So, you move the barrel instead of the front sight. Two Allen screws on the forward barrel band (one on top, the other on the bottom) are loosened, and the barrel is pushed from side to side. But there’s a catch.

Crosman 2240  barrel band
Allen screws at the top and bottom of the barrel band are loosened, and the barrel’s pushed in the direction you want the pellet to move.

While you always move a front sight in the opposite direction you want the pellet to go, when it’s the entire barrel that’s moving, that gets reversed. Move the muzzle in the direction you want the pellet to move.

It took me 6 shots to get in the bull at 12 feet, then the sights (and the barrel band) were locked down. I moved back to 10 meters and started shooting. A confirmation shot was close to the center of the bull, so the sight-in went perfectly.

Accuracy testing
The first pellet I tried was the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier. As I was shooting the group, I could see that all the pellets were hitting inside the small bullseye. But after shot 6, the hole they were making became large enough to see from 10 meters. I know that 0.84 inches for 10 shots at 10 meters doesn’t sound very good, but it looks better when you see the hole!

Crosman 2240  Premier group
Ten Premiers went into this 0.84-inch group at 10 meters. The number is large, but the group looks good.

Next, I tried some RWS Hobbys. They usually do well in guns like the 2240; and on this day, they didn’t disappoint. The first 8 went into a group that measures 0.462 inches between centers, but then the gas pressure started to drop. I could hear it happening, but I continued shooting. Shots 9 and 10 dropped below the main group, opening it to 1.043 inches. If only I’d stopped when my gut instincts told me!

Crosman 2240 Hobby group
Eight Hobbys went into the main group that measures 0.462 inches. The final 2 pellets dropped below and opened the group to 1.043 inches.

This group made me mad because I knew that my 2240 uses CO2 pretty fast. In fact, I debated shooting the second 10-shot group because sight-in and confirmation had already used up 7 shots. I knew my gun had 25 shots on full power. I guess I just tried to scrape by, and this is what happened.

So, I changed the CO2 cartridge and started again. This time, I shot JSB Exact RS pellets, that I expected to do the best of all. And I think they did. Nine of 10 shots went into 0.497 inches, and one shot strayed to the left, opening the group to 0.698 inches. I don’t actually know which of the 10 shots is off to the left because I never called it.

Crosman 2240 JSB RS group
Nine JSB Exact RS pellets went into 0.497 inches, and that one on the left opened it to 0.698 inches. It’s still the best group of this test!

Summary
The R.A.I. adapter and UTG 6-position adjustable stock were made for the Crosman 2240. I love this little air pistol, and these accessories turn it into a handy carbine. The sights are crude; but as these groups demonstrate, you don’t need target sights to do a good job.

No, I’m not going to shoot this gun at 25 yards. Sure it can do it; and yes, the groups will all be larger. With a gun like this, 10 meters seems like a comfortable distance to me.

If you enjoy the 2240, and I know there are many who do, perhaps this adapter and stock are something you should consider. If you own several Crosman air pistols and have other family members who like to shoot, I think this adapter and stock are almost required.

R.A.I. Adjustable AR Adapter for Crosman 2240 pistols: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

This report addresses:

• Missing Part 3 of the adapter report on the Marauder pistol.
• Description of the 2240 adapter.
• Mounting the 2240 adapter.
• Adapter mounted — now what?
• How difficult is the adapter to install?

If you’ve been waiting for Part 3 of the report on the R.A.I. AR Adjustable Stock Adapter used on the Benjamin Marauder pistol, you’ve been waiting a long time. I tested the pistol at 50 yards for a Part 3 report, but the results I got were unsatisfactory. I didn’t think they represented what the pistol can do, so I didn’t report them — and now a lot of time has passed.

I still plan on writing that report when I get a good day at the range, but today I have something different to show you. R.A.I. stands for R. Arms Innovations, an Illinois-based company that makes adapters to connect adjustable AR stocks to various Crosman pistols and turning them into carbines.

Dave Rensing, the owner of R. Arms Innovations, got started by making an adapter so his young son and daughter could shoulder his Benjamin Marauder pistol. When he discovered that the adjustable AR stock makes it possible for the pistol to fit both young people and adults, alike, he knew he was onto something.

Crosman already makes a stock that converts many of their pistols into carbines. But the stock they make has a fixed length of pull. Either it fits or it doesn’t.

The innovative way Dave designed his adapter allows it to be adjusted for a variety of cast-off and cast-on (butt slanted toward the body or away from it) positions, cant angles plus a wide range of comb heights. In other words — a stock that can be easily adapted to fit most people.

This is all just old news for those who read the first 2 tests of the R.A.I. adapter and the Benjamin Marauder pistol. But, today, we’re looking at a different adapter — one that works with the popular Crosman 2240 CO2 pistol. This adapter will be more popular than the Marauder pistol adapter because there are many times more shooters who shoot and modify the inexpensive 2240 family of air pistols.

2240 adapter
The 2240 adapter is very similar to the Marauder adapter, except for the way it interfaces with the pistol. The Marauder has a threaded hole where the power is adjusted. The adapter can bolt directly to that. The 2240 doesn’t have a hole, and the 2240 end cap is flush with the pistol. The adapter for the 2240 had to include a new end cap into which the adapter can be bolted.

RAI adapter bolt
The Marauder pistol has a threaded hole in its end cap to accept the R.A.I. adapter bolt. The 2240 pistol end cap doesn’t have that threaded hole.

Mounting the adapter
To install this new end cap, the pistol’s end cap must first be removed. The rear sight screw and a screw at the top rear of the grip frame hold the 2240 end cap in place. You only need to remove these 2 screws and then the factory cap comes out of the pistol. Next, attach the new cap that comes in the R.A.I. kit. It has a threaded hole that you’ll need. The adapter will then attach to the gun like it should.

Crosman 2240 end cap
Crosman 2240 end cap (right) has been removed and the R.A.I. adapter end cap (left) is ready to be installed. Only two screws are removed for this. The R.A.I. end cap has the threaded hole that accepts the adapter bolt.

Once the adapter is attached, you can screw the buffer tube of any AR extendable stock to the other end of the adapter. I used the UTG 6-position Mil-Spec AR stock on the Marauder pistol, and I note that R.A.I. offers the same stock with some of their kits. Obviously, this is a high-quality stock at a good price.

RAI adapter mounted up
The R.A.I. adapter is mounted and swung up as high as it will go.

RAI adapter mounted down
The R.A.I. adapter is swung down as low as it will go. This lowers the butt considerably. And the adapter can be locked in position at any point around a complete circle.

stock extended
The UTG stock is attached to the adapter and extended as far as it will go.

Stock collapsed
The UTG stock is collapsed as far as it will go.

Now what?
Once the adapter is mounted and the stock is attached, what can you do? This is where Crosman 2240 owners can go nuts because the possibilities are virtually endless. You can use the gun just as it is, like I’m showing here. Crosman puts a peep sight on the 2240; but until you have a shoulder stock, you can’t use it. With the stock attached, I can switch the rear sight to the peep and use it.

But most 2240 owners will probably want to switch to a steel breech. It adds strength to the gun, plus there’s an 11mm dovetail rail on top for mounting scope rings. And that extra strength can be used to hold an 18-inch barrel! Now, you have a carbine that the stock is ideally suited for! Crosman sells all these parts very reasonably.

How hard is it to install?
I don’t like things that are difficult, so I worry when there are parts to be disassembled. But here is what it took to install this adapter. It took a total of 10 minutes for me to disassemble the 2240 and install the adapter and stock. That includes the time spent taking the pictures. It isn’t difficult at all!

In the next report, I get to do something I’ve wanted to do for years. I get to shoot this 2240 using the peep sight!

R.A.I. adjustable AR stock adapter: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Today, I’ll begin testing the R.A.I. AR adjustable stock adapter from rarmsinnovations.com with the UTG Pro 6-position adjustable stock attached to the Benjamin Marauder pistol.

Length of pull
Before we begin, I want to say a word about the length of pull you get with this adapter. I gave the range of lengths in Part 1 as 14-1/8 inches to 17-1/8 inches, and that turned off many readers. In terms of conventional stocks, that pull range is very long! But Dave Rensing, who invented this adapter, made it for his 8-year-old son and his 7-year-old daughter. The son uses it conventionally, but the daughter collapses the stock past the first detent so it’s even shorter. Fully collapsed, the pull length measures exactly 14 inches but feels like 11 inches.

The AR adjustable stock is not very ergonomic. It stretches and contracts okay, but it doesn’t move in the other directions. It’s a one-size fits none kind of deal — at least from a rifle marksmanship standpoint. While it works very well for fast maneuvering and climbing in and out of tight places, your body has to adapt a lot to make it work.

On the other hand, when the R.A.I. adapter is added to it, the stock becomes almost universal! You can adjust the positions of the comb and the angles of the buttstock through a wide range of attitudes and make it fit almost anyone — young or old. I found when shooting from the bench that even the 15-1/8-inch pull I had initially set up was too short. I had to move the stock back until the pull was 15-7/8-inches before it felt natural again. However, in the offhand position, the 15-1/8-inch pull is the right one. That demonstrates why the adjustable stock works so well on this pistol! You can adjust it to whatever you need in the blink of an eye.

I discovered why this is. The AR adjustable stock has no width. The narrow tube is where your cheek rests, so your eye is closer to the centerline of the pistol than it would be with a conventional stock. The stock also does not drop at the butt, so your head thrusts forward farther than it might with a conventional stock. Instead of sticking up to rest on the cheekpiece, your head tilts forward, along the straight tube. Hence, 14 inches feels more like 11 inches. The Marauder’s pistol grip and close trigger enhance this feeling.

Benjamin Marauder Pistol Tom holding offhand
Here I’m holding the carbine offhand. The pull seen here is 15-1/8 inches, and yet the rifle feels perfect. You can see that my head has gone forward on the stock because it’s so straight.

Scope and mounts
I wanted to test the pistol with a really good scope; and the last time I tested the Marauder  I used a CenterPoint 3-12X44 compact scope. Leapers was making CenterPoint scopes back then, so this time I attached a UTG 3-12X44 compact scope. My scope is older than the one I linked to, but the optics and overall size are the same. Not only does this scope fit the carbine very well, it gives a crystal clear sight picture that makes aiming so easy.

I needed to get the scope high off the receiver because the Marauder pistol has a circular 8-shot magazine that sticks up above the receiver top. You can see it in the above photo. Also, the stock’s straight line puts my head higher than it would normally be. So, high scope rings are in order. I selected a pair of BKL 30mm high rings that have a single-screw top strap. The Marauder pistol doesn’t recoil, so these rings can be made thinner and still be strong enough to hold this scope. Once they were mounted, I noted they brought the scope’s exit pupil directly to my eye, making them the perfect height.

Testing the Marauder carbine
I tested this Marauder pistol extensively, back in 2010/2011. I already knew the right fill pressure (2,900 psi), the best pellet (.22-caliber Beeman Kodiak) and the effective number of shots per fill (32). Since it has an 8-shot magazine, I shot 8-shot groups instead of 10.

Sight-in went quick, and then I backed up to 25 yards and started shooting. The first group of Kodiaks was the second-best of the session, putting 8 into 0.554 inches. Looking back at the tests I did years ago, I wasn’t shooting as well on this day as I did back then. I shot a total of six 8-shot groups, and the largest one was 0.607 inches, while the smallest was 0.504 inches between centers.

Benjamin Marauder Pistol first group
The first group was 8 Kodiaks into 0.554 inches at 25 yards.

Benjamin Marauder Pistol largest group
The worst group of the day was 8 Kodiaks in 0.607 inches at 25 yards.

Benjamin Marauder pistol smallest group
The best group of the day was 0.504-inches for 8 Kodiaks at 25 yards.

While these groups are okay, they aren’t as small as the groups I shot previously. I don’t think it was me or the gun. In this case, I think it was the pellet. I used a different tin of Kodiaks in 2010, and they grouped much tighter in this pistol than these did. The best group back then was 0.405 inches between centers. Maybe they had larger heads, or maybe they were just different in some unquantifiable way.

Other pellets
I tried a number of different pellets in the Marauder pistol, but none of them did very well. JSBs of various weights, which I thought would do well, sprayed all over the place. I know from testing the gun that it wants a fat pellet, and the Kodiak is a good one for that. It’s slow, at an average 584 f.p.s., but even at that it produces about 16 foot-pounds of muzzle energy. That’s pretty good for an air pistol! Certainly enough for some hunting and pest elimination.

The rest of the test
I plan to take this pistol to the 50-yard range, so you’ll see the results of that. But I don’t think that’s quite the right way to test the R.A.I. adapter and adjustable stock. We already know how well the pistol performs. Now, we want the focus to be on the adapter and the stock.

Maybe I can put the gun in the hands of some other shooters and see how well it fits them. Perhaps, that’s the best way to evaluate this item. I don’t know, but I guess we’ll see.

R.A.I. adjustable AR stock adapter: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Wives, I want to warn you — today, I’m going to be The Great Enabler! Last year, I was sent a product to test for Pyramyd Air — an AR stock adapter for certain Crosman pistols by R.A.I. It lets you turn a pistol like the Benjamin Marauder into a carbine by adding an M4 telescoping stock to the back of the gun.

Why?
But why would you want to do that? Well, Dave Rensing, the owner of R. Arms Innovations — rarmsinnovations.com — wanted to do it so his young son could shoot his Marauder pistol. The big pistol is heavy for a youngster, especially when it has a scope mounted; but with an adjustable carbine stock, the youngster can size it to fit and then rest it on any convenient place and shoot it like a rifle. And because the M4 stock adjusts for length of pull, Dave can adjust it for himself in seconds. If 2 or more people can shoot the same airgun, the $400 price tag gets spread around and diluted.

The Marauder pistol does come with a factory shoulder stock that turns it into a carbine, so what does this adapter do that the factory stock doesn’t? It all comes down to adjustability. The R.A.I. adapter allows the adjustment of the stock to a wide range of positions that should fit most shooters. Not only is the pull length adjustable because of the M4 extendable stock, you can also raise and lower the stock line (the amount of comb drop), which affects the height of the butt; and you can have a wide range of cast-off and cast-on stock positions (where the stock angles away from you or toward you). And it doesn’t end there. You can also rotate the angle of the butt from straight up and down to where the toe is slanted in toward you or out, away from you.

The R.A.I. adapter helps make the Marauder pistol (and some others others I’ll mention later) into a small carbine that fits the shooter. And let’s not forget that it attaches to a telescoping M4 stock. What that does will differ with each brand; but for this test, I’m mounting a UTG PRO 6-position mil-spec stock assembly that has 6 different lengths of pull. On my test pistol, the length of pull runs from 14-1/8 inches to 17-1/8 inches. This is a rare occasion where I find the length of pull is adjustable to my liking!

The R.A.I adapter
The R.A.I. adapter is made in 3 pieces. Two are machined aluminum, and the third is the bolt that holds everything together, plus attaching it to the gun.

RAI adapter view 1
The R.A.I. adapter consists of these 3 parts.

RAI adapter view 2
This view reveals the essence of the R.A.I. design. That elongated hole, which can be positioned at any angle around a full circle, allows the smaller piece to slide out to the edge of the larger piece.

RAI adapter bolt
The bolt fits through both machined pieces and threads into the hole at the back of the Marauder.

RAI adapter installed
Here, the adapter is installed. The bolt runs through both machined pieces and fastens them to the pistol. The smaller piece fits over the Marauder end cap.

RAI adapter view 1
That elongated hole in the large piece allows the adapter to be rotated up.

RAI adapter rotated down
Here the adapter is shown rotated down. It can be rotated to any position around a full circle!

The stock
Now that you understand how the adapter works, let’s look at the stock that attaches to it. I used a UTG PRO mil-spec stock assembly that has 6 positions for length. The mil-spec designation means the stock tube size conforms to military drawings.

This stock comes from Leapers as a complete package that’s ready to install. The buffer and buffer spring are shipped inside the stock but are not needed for the airgun application. The flange that locks the stock to the AR receiver to prevent it from rotating on the firearm can also be removed.

Leapers AR extendable stock
The Leapers UTG extendable AR stock comes complete and ready for an AR. The buffer, buffer spring and stock flange can be eliminated for this application.

When the stock is screwed into the adapter, the castellated locknut that tightens the stock can be used to lock it in any orientation you want. Regardless of how the adapter is positioned, the stock can be snugged down. This makes the R.A.I. adapter a very adjustable item!

Leapers AR extendable stock locknut
This castellated locknut allows you to lock the stock in any position. The adapter can be rotated however it suits you, and the stock can then be locked to it in any position.

I found this adjustability to be a blessing! As I’ve mentioned more than once, I usually have to adapt to the rifle I’m testing because not many rifles adjust. Most stocks are too short for me, and most combs are too low. I’ve learned to put up with just about anything to get the job done, but it’s rare that I get to shoot a rifle that actually fits me. This R.A.I. adapter may change that with the Marauder pistol.

I’ve now adjusted the stock so the gun comes up fast and feels fine against my shoulder. I won’t know for sure if I have it adjusted right until I shoot the carbine several times — so guess what’s coming?

Leapers extendable stock mounted
With the stock mounted, I find that I can position it exactly as I like it. This might work!

I was surprised to find that the stock’s pull was 15-1/8 inches when I had it adjusted the way I like. I always knew that I liked a longer pull, but this was even longer than I’d suspected.

I also have the comb’s drop set at the maximum; but since this is a straight-line stock, it’s perfect. The cast is set straight for me. And I have the toe of the butt canted into my collarbone. It will require some shooting to establish if this is the best fit for me, but right now it feels good.

What else will it fit?
Besides the Benjamin Marauder this adapter also fits the Crosman Silhouette pistol, the Crosman 1720T PCP Target air pistol, and the Benjamin Marauder Woods Walker. These PCP pistols are all expensive, so the R.A.I. adapter offers a way to expand the utility of each of them across a wide spectrum of shooters.

Is it worth it?
The R.A.I. adapter costs extra, and so does any extendable AR stock you’ll need to purchase with it. The Marauder already comes with a shoulder stock, so is this setup worth the extra expense? It is if you want your carbine to fit a lot of different shooters. If you want to share your carbine with your wife or your children, then this adapter makes that possible, with the gun adjusting to fit everyone. It’s also something to consider if the regular stocks don’t fit too well. I can’t say this one is universal, but it does cover a pretty wide ranges of needs.

What’s next?
This accessory is unlike what I usually test. I’ll be shooting the Marauder pistol to see if I like how the stock makes it shoot for me. That’s a little different than my normal type of test, but I think it should be very interesting and perhaps even informative. Stick around — there’s more to come!

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