Let’s build a multi-pump!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • B.B. is on board
  • Benjamin Marauder
  • Weight and fit
  • Trigger
  • Number of shots
  • Repeater?
  • Quiet?
  • Power
  • Where is the pump tube?
  • Sights
  • Keep those power adjustments?
  • No, to a parts kit
  • Don’t even THINK it!
  • So what?
  • Crosman knows, too

I am not writing an historical report today, because something has crept into our discussions that needs to be addressed. I will make up for this by publishing an extra historical report next Tuesday, along with the Monday and Friday reports.

This will be a good report for airgun companies to read, because it comes straight from the grassroots users of your airguns. They are asking for a specific multi-pump pneumatic.

B.B. is on board

This discussion has been going on for many months — maybe even longer than a year. American airgunners say they would like a high-quality multi-pump pneumatic, and today we are going to look at all that might mean. I’ve just watched this from the sidelines until now, but I do have things to contribute, so today I’m going to start the dialog in ernest.

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Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • Max power
  • Air use?
  • H&N Sniper Magnum
  • Crosman Premier 10.5 grains
  • Baracuda Match again
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the Hatsan Gladius long at 50 yards. I’m taking some time with this rifle for a couple important reasons. First — I think it deserves the extra attention because of the features it offers. And second — because the Gladius is so similar to other Hatsan PCP platforms, readers can use the report for many different models.

Hatsan Gladius Tom at bench
The Hatsan Gladius rifle was easy to shoot from 50 yards.

H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads

The day was perfect. No breeze to disturb the flight of the .177 caliber pellets. I loaded the rifle with 10 H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads and started the test. I left the power setting on 3, where it was at the end of the 25-yard test. I wanted to see how much difference there would be at 50 yards, and I was surprised.

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Characteristics of a classic airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Airguns are easy to use
  • Airguns are quiet
  • Airguns cock easily
  • Airguns are accurate
  • Airguns have good sights
  • What about plastic?
  • Triggers
  • What have I missed?
  • Why is this in the history section?

I celebrate my victories quietly. One of them has been to expose the elements of classic airgun design, so people who need to know can understand what it takes to make something timeless and enduring. We all know that the airgun manufacturers are silent readers of this blog and its comments. Today I am dedicating this report to them — a compilation of design aspects that will ensure a classic airgun. I’ll tell you why at the end of the report.

Airguns are easy to use

Yes, there are people who only shoot airguns. Before I wrote this blog I had no idea there were so many of them, but there are. They are a sizable element of the shooting population and designers need to be aware of them. But their numbers are overwhelmed by the number of firearms shooters who also shoot airguns from time to time. And why do they do it? Because airguns are easy to shoot. I can pick up a Diana 27 and snap off 5 shots at targets of opportunity before you can pack your AR-15 with bipod and sniper scope into that oversized black tactical bag! And we both know the rifle isn’t all you need to go to the range. You load the car with stuff, while I carry my 6-pound breakbarrel in one hand, and a tin of pellets in my pocket.

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Hammerli trainer: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Famous last words
  • A month of frustration
  • Found on the floor!
  • One ball or two?
  • Stacking BBs
  • August to the rescue!
  • Bearing found!
  • Assembly instructions
  • Performance
  • Velocity — Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Daisy Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Fixed again!
  • Trigger pull

Famous last words

With the help of a link from reader August, I finally figured how to correctly assemble the Hammerli trainer for the Swiss K31 Schmidt Rubin straight-pull rifle. Taking it apart was no problem whatsoever, and you read about that in Part 3. Once the powerplant was apart I was able to push the jammed BBs and lead particles out of the bore. Then I cleaned the powerplant, straightened the air tube and soaked the piston seal in oil for a couple days. Then I thought I would assemble it and continue the test. In fact my last statement in part 3 was, “After that (assembly) I fully expect it to function as it is supposed to.”

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2016 SHOT Show: Day 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Shot Show Media Day
Shot Show Day 2
Shot Show Day 3

This report covers:

  • Best SHOT ever!
  • Crosman
  • Maximus
  • AirForce
  • Hatsan
  • Hercules
  • Hatsan regulator

Before we begin, I have a sad announcement. Ron Sauls, whom many readers knew and dealt with at Bryan and Associates, passed away yesterday. Ron will be remembered fondly by the airgun community for all he did to further our hobby.

Best SHOT ever!

Holy cow! I’ve covered SHOT Shows for the past 20 years, but this one tops them all. My day was so fantastic that I will only be able to give you an overview of it. I will return several times and give you more of what’s happening. Today, just the major things I saw on day one, and not all of those!

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Hammerli Trainer: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • European military trainers
  • K31
  • Trainer
  • Caliber
  • A major purchase!
  • Where we stand

I’m out at Media Day at the Range today. So tomorrow I’ll start showing you new stuff from the SHOT Show.

About three weeks ago I was cruising the auction website Gun Broker, looking at the listings of one of my favorite dealers. This guy sells oddball and eclectic firearms and, from time to time, airguns. I saw a Hammerli Trainer that was made for the bolt action K31 Schmidt Rubin rifle Switzerland used. I thought I recognized this trainer from Smith’s Standard Encyclopedia of Gas, Air and Spring Guns of the World, and, sure enough, I found it on pages 159-164.

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Air Arms S410 TDR precharged pneumatic pellet rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Arms TDR rifle
Both side of the Air Arms S410 TDR.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The G6 pump has a luminous dial!
  • Many things to test
  • The point of the test
  • Third group
  • Analysis of the first series
  • High power
  • Air Arms dome
  • End of the test

Today we take the Air Arms S410 TDR Classic to the range. If you recall, I got good stable velocity with the power selector set on medium power, so I left it set that way for this test.

The G6 pump has a luminous dial!

You may also recall that I am filling the TRD with an Air Venturi G6 hand pump. I do that because the TDR has an Air Arms proprietary fill adaptor that nothing else fits, so I attached it to the G6 for this test. The velocity test suggested there may be as many as 30 good shots from a fill to 2900 psi, and filling the rifle to that pressure isn’t hard to do. But the morning I was at the range I discovered something curious. The G6 pump I’m using has a dial that glows in the dark!

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