Posts Tagged ‘sidelever’

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle

The Cometas Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Before I start, here’s a reminder that the Roanoke Airgun Expo will be held on Friday and Saturday, October 19 and 20. If you can come, try to arrive on Friday (noon to 7 p.m.), because that’s when the best deals are found — though there can be some good local walk-ins on Saturday. They say the show goes 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, but don’t believe it. By 1:30 the place starts clearing out fast.

The location is in the Roanoke Moose Lodge #284 at 3233 Catawba Valley Drive in Salem, VA, but don’t expect to find it with Map Quest. Just drive up Catawba Valley Drive (which is on Map Quest) several miles until you see the Moose Lodge on a hill on your right.

Mac and I will have a couple tables there. Mac’s bringing a couple 10-meter guns, and I’m bringing that cased FWB 124 I wrote about. Other dealers like Larry Hannusch will be there, and you never know what you will find at this show. Several of our regular blog readers such Fred from the PRoNJ and RidgeRunner will also be there. If you’re a blog reader, please stop by my table and say hi. Okay, let’s get to today’s report.

Today, I’ll show you the results of shooting the Cometa Lynx precharged air rifle at 50 yards. This is the real acid test for any air rifle — precharged or otherwise. They may hold together well out to 35 and even to 40 yards, but I’ve found from long experience that 50 yards separates the good ones from the great ones. And it exposes the ones that can’t keep up.

And here’s an important reminder for newer readers. I shoot 10-shot groups unless there’s a good reason not to. I always tell you if I’m shooting less than 10 shots. Five-shot groups simply do not test a rifle’s accuracy. What they test are the laws of chance, a shooter’s hopes and a bunch of other things that aren’t important, but 10-shot groups prove the real accuracy of the airgun.

My groups will always be larger than those you see elsewhere. Ten shots will group larger than 5 shots in so many cases that it isn’t worth thinking about. Whenever I go back and read these reports to find out the accuracy of an airgun I’ve tested, I’m so glad when I tested it with 10 shots and disappointed if I tested it with less. I hate the additional work it entails, because every one of those shots has to be perfect, but the result is well worth the effort.

News from AirForce
The day before I went to the range last week to test this rifle, I got a call from John McCaslin of AirForce. He told me they’ve been testing all the Lynx rifles and they found that dialing the power back to 20 foot-pounds produced better results for them. You’ll recall from Part 2 that our Lynx is putting out pellets at close to or just over 30 foot-pounds. So, based on that information, I went to the range with the power dialed back to about 20 foot-pounds.

I did that over the chronograph the day before going to the range. There were two pellets that John told me were giving him good results — the 15.9-grain JSB Exact pellet that had not done so well for me at 25 yards and the 18.1-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy that was the best pellet in my 25-yard test.

John told me to adjust the velocity until the 15.9-grain JSB was going about 750 f.p.s., so that’s what I did. It took 2 complete turns of the power adjustment screw to get it to that velocity, where it produces 19.86 foot-pounds, and I nailed that average.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle power adjustment
The Allen screw atop the rear of the receiver (in the upper right corner of the photo) is loosened so the power adjustment screw can be turned. I had to remove the scope to loosen the top screw, so I left it loose for adjustments at the range. The position of the Allen wrench leg tells you where the adjustment has been moved relative to where you began.

To adjust the power, loosen the locking screw atop the rear of the receiver, so the power adjustment screw will turn. I had to remove the scope to get at this screw; but if I owned this Lynx, I’d cut the short leg off an Allen wrench for this job. Then the scope could remain in place.

Since I was going to the 50-yard range and the 4.5-14×42 Hawke Tactical Sidewinder scope was available, I installed it at this time. It’s the clearest scope I have, and I wanted to give the Lynx every opportunity to shine.

Beautiful day!
I get to the range very early to avoid the wind that always picks up in this part of the country. Unfortunately, on this perfectly calm day, there was another shooter already there and he was one of those super-gregarious types who likes to tell you his life’s story in 30 minutes or more (per anecdote!), so I had to be a little rude. If I’m not done shooting by 9 a.m., I’m out of time because the breeze almost always kicks up. I also had the Rogue to test on this day, but I tested the Lynx first because the Rogue’s bullets are heavy enough to buck a little breeze.

The first pellet I tested was the 15.9-grain JSB. Unfortunately, the test rifle still did not like it, even at 20 foot pounds, so I stopped the group after just 6 shots. The group was already at 1.871 inches, and I didn’t see any future in it. As I said, I was burning sunlight fast and trying to pull away from Gabby the Gunman on the next bench, so I shifted to the 18.1-grain pellets next. We were the only two shooters at the entire range complex and, with a dozen benches on the 50/100-yard line, he had to sit right next to me and shoot his short-barreled Remington 600 in .308! The blast reminded me of tank gunnery!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 15.9-grain-target
Even at 20 foot-pounds, the test Lynx still does not like JSB 15.9-grain pellet. I shot only 6 times at 50 yards.

While it sounds like I’m rushing, I’m actually taking a lot of time with each shot. I’m just moving as fast as possible for everything besides shooting. But with 10-shot groups, it’s vital that no shot can be called a flyer. Because if it can, you have to shoot the group over again.

The 18.1-grain pellet was much better at 50 yards, though the final shot did open the group quite a bit. But it was a perfect shot on my end — that was just where the pellet went. Ten shots went into a group measuring 1.756 inches, but 9 of them went into 1.005 inches. And this was on low power, with this pellet going about 710 f.p.s. The breeze was just beginning to kick up, so I adjusted back to high power and shot another group.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 18.1-grain-group-low-power
Ten 18.1-grain JSB Exacts made this 1.756-inch group at 50 yards. Nine went into just more than one inch.

You might wonder how I adjusted power at the range. I didn’t have to use a chronograph, because the day before I’d discovered that the Lynx will return to a certain power level based on how far the screw is turned. All you have to do is watch the short end of the Allen wrench and use it as an indicator. I knew that two complete turns of the screw would put me back where I wanted to be, so it was that simple.

On high power, 10 shots went into 1.47 inches, but 9 of them went into 1.108 inches and 8 made a group that measures just 0.928 inches between centers. See what I mean about 10-shot groups? I shot only a couple of them, and yet I got data as good as a handful of 5-shots groups. Because with a 5-shot group, you never know….

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 18.1-grain group-high-power
The high-power setting was better. Ten 18.1-grain JSB Exacts made this 1.47-inch group at 50 yards. Nine went into 1.108 inches and 8 made a 0.928-inch group.

The breeze was starting to pick up, and I needed to get on with the Rogue test, so there was time for just one more pellet — the big 25.4-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster. It had shown promise at 25 yards, so I wondered how it would translate to 50 yards. The gun was still at 30 foot-pounds, so the power should be fine. Even at this level, this heavy pellet only goes 741 f.p.s. But this one did not want to group at 50 yards! The pellets were shooting such a large open group that I didn’t even bother completing it. And I can’t show it to you because several shots were off the target paper (but still visible on the paper backer I always use).

So my test shows that the Lynx seems to group 10 good pellets into just over one inch at 50 yards. That’s good, but it has a lot of competition at the same price or better.

Final observation
The Lynx has a regulator, so it gets more shots than unregulated guns shooting at the same power. When it’s on the reg, those shots are very consistent. It has both a magazine and a single-shot adapter, so you can be satisfied either way.

Although several readers did not like the appearance of the wood stock, I like it. The work seems on par with any other high-end PCP stock. I also liked the standard Foster quick-disconnect fill fitting. And the shroud certainly works well, as the rifle never hints at the power it produces — it sounds like a .22-caliber Diana 27 springer running at 475 f.p.s.

I expect the accuracy will be the biggest sticking point for most people. With the Talon SS, Condor and Marauder on the market — all of which can produce smaller groups at 50 yards under perfect conditions — a fellow would really have to love the Lynx. He might like it because, unlike the AirForce rifles, it has a wood stock, or unlike the Marauder, the stock is slim and trim. Either way, now you know the whole story.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle

The Cometas Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Part 1
Part 2

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle for the first time. This test will be at 25 yards and will give me the opportunity to adjust the scope and to find one or two accurate pellets for this rifle. I also plan to shoot the Lynx at 50 yards, so today is preparation for that.

I used the single-shot adapter for all shooting in this test. I’ve used the magazine for this rifle and it works fine; but when I’m doing accuracy tests, I like to shoot them one at a time, if possible.

The test was 10 shots, rested, at 25 yards, unless otherwise stated. The first pellet I tried was the 15.9-grain JSB Exact pellet. I’d thought this might be the most accurate pellet in this rifle, as it often is in PCPs of this power. But this time was different, for 10 pellets made a group that measures 0.795 inches between centers! That’s not a good group for a PCP at 25 yards. It’s more of a magnum-springer group.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB Exact target
Ten 15.9-grain JSB Exacts made this group that measures 0.795 inches between centers.

That target surprised me, for I thought this pellet would be a slam-dunk, and it clearly wasn’t. That caused me to slow down and think about the test a little more.

The next pellet I tried was the Beeman Kodiak. I had played with Kodiaks earlier in this rifle, and they seemed to do well. This time, though, they didn’t group at all. I stopped shooting after 5 shots, and that very vertical group measures 0.879 inches between centers. I did notice that the pellets fit very tight in the breech, so that may be the problem.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle Beeman Kodiak target
Just 5 Beeman Kodiak pellets went into this 0.879-inch group at 25 yards. Not a pellet for this rifle!

At this point, there was nothing to lose, so I tried the Predator Polymag pellet. It has never performed well for me in the past, but I thought this time might be different. Alas, that wasn’t the case. I lost the count and shot 6 Predators into a 0.731-inch group. That’s too bad, because if you can hit with this pellet it does perform. But with accuracy like the Lynx is giving, you’re taking too big a risk when shooting at any distance.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle Predator Polymag target
Six Predator Polymags made this 0.731-inch group. Another pellet the Lynx doesn’t care for.

I switched to that old-time favorite, the Crosman Premier. These are usually good in PCPs. But in the Lynx, just 5 of them gave a horizontal group that measures 0.781 inches between centers. Another non-starter! And those who like to analyze things might consider how the rifle can string Kodiaks vertically and Premiers horizontally.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle Crosman Premier target
Five Crosman Premiers went into this very linear group that measures 0.781 inches between centers.

Finally, the pellets were found!
I was very concerned at this point. The rifle wasn’t liking any of the pellets I usually select for accuracy. But there were a couple good choices remaining. The first of these was the 25.4-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster, a new domed pellet that delivers a huge punch in a precharged rifle. This was the first time I think I’ve tried this pellet in a test, though the tin was already open when I started. And they grouped well in the Lynx, too! Ten made a tight group that measures 0.492 inches, and that’s with a single straggler! Nine went into 0.464 inches!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB Jumbo Monster target
The JSB Exact Jumbo Monster shot well in the Lynx. Ten shots gave a very round group that measures 0.492 inches. This looked promising!

The next pellet I tried was the JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy — an 18.1-grain dome that some readers really admire! I haven’t gotten the best results from this pellet in the past, but this time I did. Ten went into a group measuring 0.362 inches. It was the best group of the session, and the one I will shoot first at 50 yards!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB Jumbo Heavy target
The JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy shot best. Ten shots gave a very round group that measures 0.362 inches. This is the pellet of choice for this Lynx.

So far
I learned a lot from this test. First, I learned that accuracy isn’t always a given. You have to try other pellets to find what works. And when you find it, the difference in accuracy can be startling.

Next, I learned that how the pellets feed into the breech may have a lot to do with the ultimate accuracy. I was certainly able to feel when the Kodiaks weren’t working.

Next stop is the 50-yard outdoor range, where the Lynx will be up against the odds. Ten shots at 50 yards is a pretty good acid test of accuracy for any airgun.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Announcement: Gary Lee is this week’s winner of Pyramyd Air’s Big Shot of the Week on their airgun facebook page. He’ll receive a $50 Pyramyd Air gift card. Congratulations!

Pyramyd Air Big Shot of the Week facebook winner

Gary Lee submitted this week’s winning photo for BSOTW.

Part 1
Part 2

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle right
The IZH 60 now comes with target sights.

It’s accuracy day for the IZH 60 Target Pro and this is the big test that everyone has been waiting for. And there are a couple of things that have to be cleared up, too. So let’s get started.

Cosmoline in the bore
Blog reader chasblock mentioned finding Cosmoline in the bore of his rifle and asked if I would take a look at the test gun’s bore. I don’t think he really meant Cosmoline, which is a range of military long-term metal storage lubricants. He probably just meant excess grease or oil. At any rate, I ran a patch through the bore, and it came out dry. There was some anti-oxidant compound on it, but no oil or grease. So, that’s one down.

Front sight element not centered
Then, we had a discussion about the front sight element not being centered in the globe and wondered if that wouldn’t that throw you off. Or at least wouldn’t it be annoying? Well, I shot 82 shots in this test and the front sight position was a non-issue for me. Once I had the black 10-meter bull centered in the front aperture, I forgot about everything else. But I’m posting a photo of a Winchester model 94 front sight so you can see that this is a very common phenomenon, and it isn’t troublesome in the slightest.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle front sight
The IZH 60 front sight element is a little higher than the center of the globe. When you’re sighting, it’s not a distraction.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle Winchester 94 front sight
This Winchester 94 front sight is even higher in its globe and people hunt with it. Many open-sighted rifles with globes are like this.

Rear sight doesn’t adjust low enough
Another issue that was raised is that the rear sight doesn’t adjust low enough to get on target at 10 meters. I didn’t find this to be a problem, as you will see. I also found the rear sight to adjust very positively in all directions without any backlash. So, that’s now laid to rest.

Accuracy
I was told by the folks at Pyramyd Air that the IZH 60 Target Pro can put 10 pellets into a quarter-inch at 10 meters. The gun they sent to me to test had a 5-shot group of H&N Baracudas with it. It was fired into a Shoot-N-C paster, so measuring is difficult, but as near as I can tell, it measures 0.268 inches between centers, so even these 5 shots grouped larger than a quarter-inch, though not by much. But we expect a 10-shot group to be 40 percent larger when the same pellet is used.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle test groupt
The 5-shot test group measures 0.268 inches between centers, as close as I can measure it. It was shot with H&N Baracudas. The shot outside the black is a sighter and not part of the group.

The rifle was shot from a rested position at 10 meters. The targets were standard 10-meter rifle targets, and they fit well inside the front aperture. It was very easy to hold on target with this rifle. I laid the stock on the back of my hand that was resting on a sandbag.

The trigger-pull is single-stage and vague as to the let-off point, but it’s light enough to work very well in this rested position. The rifle is very light, but it didn’t seem to move around as much as I’d feared it would.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle pellets
This was a thorough test!

H&N Baracudas
The first target I shot was with the H&N Baracudas. It took me several shots to get on target because the sight adjustments work backwards of U.S. adjustments. Turn the windage knob in (to the left) to move the pellet to the right, and so on.

The first group of 10 Baracudas measures 0.546 inches between centers. It was larger than expected, but not too bad for the first group.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle Baracuda Target1
Ten H&N Baracudas made this 0.546-inch group.

As you can see from the pellets I had chosen to use, I expected to shoot a lot in this test, so I thought I would speed things up by firing 5 shots and then seeing if it was worth firing 5 more. The next pellet up was the RWS Hobby that sometimes surprises us with great accuracy. This wasn’t one of those times, however, because the first 5 pellets made a group that measures 0.482 inches between centers. No sense finishing that one!

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle RWS Hobby target

Five RWS Hobbys made this 0.482-inch group. No sense finishing it.

Next, I tried the RWS R10 Match Pistol pellet that I thought might be the most accurate in this rifle. It wasn’t, as 5 made a group measuring 0.452 inches. Once more, no sense going on. So I stopped at 5 and moved on.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle RWS R10 Pistol target

Five RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets made this 0.452-inch group. No sense finishing it, either.

Then, I tried the H&N Match Pistol pellet. Something was different with this pellet, because the rifle recoiled noticeably less. It was easy to feel, and I could follow-through much better because the sights remained on target after the shot. The feeling was so good that I didn’t check the target after 5, but went all the way to 10 shots before looking. The 10-shot group measures 0.391 inches between centers and was the tightest group (10 shots!) to this point in the test! It’s not a quarter-inch, but it’s a very good group, nonetheless.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle HN Pistol Match target

Ten H&N Pistol Match pellets made this 0.391-inch group. This pellet felt like it made the rifle recoil a lot less, so I finished the group without checking.

Next, I tried the JSB Exact RS pellet that often surprises us. This is a domed pellet, so it can’t be used in a formal match (impossible to score), but most shooters won’t care about that. Ten pellets made a group measuring 0.284 inches between centers. It’s a nice, round group, and it’s the best 10-shot group the test rifle shot all day!

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle JSB Exact RS target1
Ten JSB Exact RS pellets made this 0.284-inch group. This pellet also felt like it made the rifle recoil a lot less, so once again I finished the group without checking. This is the best 10-shot group of the test.

This pellet shoots so well that I shot a second group with it. That one didn’t turn out as good, at 0.502 inches between centers. Perhaps I was tiring out?

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle JSB Exact RS target2
Another 10 Exact RS pellets were not so good, at 0.502 inches between centers.

I then turned to H&N Finale Match pistol pellets, which I thought would be better than the Match Pistol pellets. Alas, that wasn’t the case. Ten of them made a huge 0.675 inch group, which turned out to be the second largest of the entire test..

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle Finale Match Pistol target
Ten H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets made the second worst group of the test, a whopping 0.675 inches between centers.

Then I tried five RWS Superdomes, but when I looked at the group they made I stopped. It measures 0.646 inches between centers, so no point in continuing.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle RWS Superdome target
Five RWS Superdome pellets made this 0.646-inch group.

By this point in the test, I knew how the rifle shot. I was also very accustomed to the trigger. So, I thought I’d try another group of Baracudas — just to see if I could improve things from the first time. Ten went into a group measuring 0.702 inches, which was larger than the first group.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle HN Baracuda target2
Ten H&N Baracudas made this final 0.702-inch group — the largest in the test.

By this point I knew I was tired. But was that the cause of the group sizes? Was I no longer able to lay them all in the same hole? To see, I grabbed my FWB 300S, which is the most accurate 10-meter rifle I own. I put 10 RWS R10 pistol pellets into a last group that measured 0.135 inches. That’s for 10 shots. So it wasn’t me!

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle FWB 300S target
Yeah — it’s not me! Ten RWS R10s went into 0.135 inches.

Final impression
The IZH 60 shot about as well as I remembered. It certainly cannot group 10 shots in a quarter-inch at 10 meters in anything other than a chance encounter. So, there’s a hat to be eaten!

On the other hand, for what it costs, the rifle is reasonably accurate and the target sights make it even easier to shoot well. I don’t think it can out-shoot a Bronco, but it’s certainly worth considering for informal target shooting.

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle right
The IZH 60 Target Pro now comes with target sights.

Today is velocity day for the IZH 60 Target Pro. Before we begin, there’s a surprise correction I need to make to Part 1. When I measured the length of pull, I didn’t mention that the adjustable stock can be lengthened an additional inch by relocating the anchor point of the adjustment screw.

Increased length of pull
Mac reads the blog sometimes, but he doesn’t comment very often but he loves the IZH 60/61 family of rifles. After reading Part 1, he called and reminded me of something I’d forgotten. If you pull the butt stock off its post, you’ll see a second spot for the screw anchor on the butt stock post. All you have to do is move the anchor from the first slot to the second, and you’ll add just over an inch to the length of pull on your rifle. I had reported a LOP range of 12 inches to 13.25 inches in Part 1. Now, I’ll revise that to a maximum of 14.5 inches. (Edith will amend the owner’s manual to show this info.)

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle stock adjustment screw anchor
By moving the screw anchor from one slot to the other, the length of pull can be increased by more than an inch!

The importance of follow-through
We discussed the fact that this powerplant is not capable of producing a lot of velocity. There was a comment on Part 1 that low velocity makes you need to follow through all the more, but I want to address that. Low velocity is not why you must follow through when shooting a spring-piston airgun. Even a 1,300 f.p.s. springer requires follow-through because it has the same problem as the IZH 60. In a springer, the pellet does not begin moving until the piston has almost come to a complete stop. The gun is already vibrating and moving in recoil before the pellet starts its journey down the barrel. But if it takes an IZH 60 to drive that fact home, all the better, because the proper follow-through can do nothing but make you a better shot.

Velocity
As I explained in Part 1, Pyramyd Air sent this rifle to me for this test. They were very confident this rifle would shoot accurately, and they even sent a tin of what they feel are the best pellets. Guess what they are? H&N Baracuda pellets! The website says these are supposed to weigh 10.65 grains, but I weighed the ones sent by Pyramyd Air, and they weighed 10.4 grains. H&N Baracuda pellet weights have changed a lot over the past few years, and I would always recommend actually weighing them rather than accepting the description, because the weights seem to change a lot.

These pellets averaged 382 f.p.s. in the test rifle. The range of velocity went from 371 to 389 f.p.s. At the average velocity, they generate 3.37 foot-pounds of muzzle energy. They will be the first pellets I test for accuracy; but since they’re domed pellets, they cannot be used in a formal target match due to the difficulty of scoring the holes. I’ll also test some wadcutter pellets — both target and general sporting types.

The second pellet I tested was a target wadcutter — the H&N Match Pistol pellet. This 7.56-grain wadcutter is a good general target pellet that costs less than H&N’s Finale Match pellet line. As a pistol pellet, it weighs less than 8 grains, making it appropriate to the IZH 60 powerplant.

This pellet averaged 485 f.p.s. and ranged from 481 to 490 f.p.s. At the average velocity, they generated 3.95 foot-pounds at the muzzle. This is the velocity I expected from this rifle.

Next I tried the H&N Baracuda Green — the lead-free pellet that’s performed so well in a number of lower-powered airguns. This time, though, the performance wasn’t as good. The average velocity was 425 f.p.s., despite the fact that the pellet weighs just 6.48 grains. It must be the harder alloy that causes excessive friction with the rifling, because the range for this pellet was from a low of 367 f.p.s. to a high of 489! At the average velocity, the muzzle energy was 2.60 foot-pounds. Even at just 10 meters, a velocity variation this large will cause the group to grow, so I don’t think I’ll test this one for accuracy.

The last pellet I tested was the RWS R-10 Match Pistol pellet. At just 7 grains, this pellet was the lightest of the lead pellets used in this test. It averaged 525 f.p.s. with a range from 507 to 534 f.p.s. The low shot was an exception and loaded very hard. The next-slowest pellet went 516 f.p.s. At the average velocity, this pellet produced 4.29 foot-pounds of energy.

Overall the rifle performed better than I expected. There’s some buzzing in the firing cycle, but it’s not objectionable — probably because of the low power of the rifle. A “beer-can” tune would probably do wonders for it.

The trigger is light enough, if not very positive. It breaks at 1 lb., 7 oz. consistently. I did try adjusting it, but it was set as light as it would go when I received the rifle, so there was no improvement.

One final thought. I went through the box the rifle came in and found a target that proves this rifle can shoot a tight group at 10 meters. It’s shot on a Shoot-N-C target, so measurement is impossible because of the paint flaking off, but it does look like a quarter-inch group. However, it’s only 5 shots and the standard is 10, so that hat is still on the line!

IZH 60 Target Pro air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier


The IZH 60 now comes with target sights.

This report has a lot riding on it. First, I was specifically asked to do this by Pyramyd Air after I made some remarks about the new IZH rifles with their plastic receivers. I tested both the IZH 60 and the IZH 61 a couple years back and found they did not have the same accuracy as they did a decade ago when the receivers were made of metal. I found the plastic clips for the IZH 61 did not seem to index as well as the older metal clips.

But Pyramyd Air has brought out the IZH 60 Target Pro and the IZH 61 Target Pro air rifles as viable substitutes for lower-end target rifles. I was challenged to test one my usual way; and if the rifle I tested can’t keep 10 rounds in a quarter-inch at 10 meters, well — somebody is going to eat his hat!

Now, I enjoy a slice of hat every so often, nicely broiled with garlic and onions, but I won’t throw this test just to see someone else eat one. Because the second thing that’s hanging on the outcome is a lot of purchase decisions. There’s something about these Russian sidelever springers that attracts people; and when target sights are added, it gets serious!

Back when I wrote the Airgun Revue publications, a lot of airgunners in my area were buying these guns as fast as they could. My buddy, Mac, bought at least 23 of them. Every time he got one, he would show it to someone who would then buy it from him — forcing him to buy another.

One local guy took an IZH 60 and added Anschütz target sights and a custom-made laminated stock to it. He spent less than a hundred dollars for the rifle and then put over $500 into it. People thought he was crazy until he started doing well in local 10-meter target matches. Then they realized that this rifle has the capability to be a lot more than the price seems to indicate. [Note from Edith: I remember this man, as he'd brought his gun to an airgun show. He was accompanied by his wife and their infant. I recall seeing the gun reclining ever so tenderly in the stroller, while his wife had to carry the baby around the show!]

But what about today? Now that the receiver has been changed to plastic, does the gun still shoot? That’s the question this report will answer — and just in time for the holidays for those inclined to add a target rifle to their collections. If this rifle can shoot, then Pyramyd Air has done what it took over $600 to do back in the 1990s, and they’ve done it for less than $200.

Cost and serial number
Both the IZH 60 and 61 basic rifles cost $120. The Target Pro versions like the model 60 I’m testing are both priced at $180. The rifle I’m testing is serial number 126001228.

General description
The IZH 60 is a single-shot sidelever spring-piston air rifle. It has a futuristic stock with an adjustable butt that changes the pull length from 12-inches to 13.25-inches. There are no detents, so the stock can be set anywhere within these limits.


Loosen the thumbscrew under the buttstock and position it where you want.

Loading
The power is low, producing just under 500 f.p.s. So, the rifle cocks easy. That and the light weight of the little rifle make it a good one for smaller children, except for seating the pellet. On the 60, the pellet has to be manually seated by pushing forward on a thin steel bolt handle, while on the 61 the pellet is automatically seated when the cocking handle is returned home. Sometimes, manually seating the pellet takes a lot of effort. Therefore, the 61 makes a better youth target rifle if you don’t want to load every shot for them.


When the sidelever is retracted, the bolt opens automatically, exposing the loading trough. Bolt handle is the thin silver rod under the rear sight thumbscrew.

Sights
While the rifle comes with good adjustable sporting sights, the Target Pro guns have an adjustable target peep rear sight and front sight inserts. Daisy supplies the rear sight, and it is all-metal. It’s a lot better-looking than the plastic Daisy aperture rear sight they used to offer on some of their target rifles.

I tried both adjustments on the rear sight and they feel crisp and seem to be repeatable, without backlash. The older Daisy plastic peep sight had a problem with backlash, but this one seems fine. I will test the sight for adjustability after we know how accurate the rifle is.

The front sight has interchangeable inserts, and three of them are apertures, which are the preferred front sight for precision today. When I unpacked the rifle, the entire front sight assembly was canted several degrees to the right; and I was about to fire off an email to get the hat ready. But I discovered that when the sight is disassembled for insert replacement, you can adjust the assembly wherever you want it. So — crisis averted. I only wish my 1917 American Enfield had the same capability! Its front sight assembly was rotated to the right permanently during an arsenal refinish, and was so disagreeable to look at that I sold the rifle.


Unscrew the muzzle cap and the entire front sight assembly comes off, allowing the inserts to be changed. You can also center the front globe upright and lock it in place.

Barrel
The barrel is what made the IZH 60 and 61 stand apart from most other spring rifles in the same price range. It’s hammer-forged, which is known to give a more consistent bore if done correctly; and the Russians have always been noted for the accuracy of their barrels. But as I said, we shall see by testing. After all, there’s a tasty hat at stake.

Trigger
The rifle’s trigger adjusts for the pull length, which means where the let-off point is. It’s a single-stage trigger that’s very light but also very vague. It’s not a target trigger, but it’s much better than the trigger on a Daisy 953.

My plan
I plan to test the heck out of this rifle. If it’s as good as I’ve been told, I’ll shout it from the bell tower. But if not, there better be a hat ready!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier


The Cometas Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Part 1

Today, we’ll look at the velocity and power of the Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle. Blog reader /Dave has asked if I will please post the price of the gun in the first report because he reads the blog on his telephone, where navigation is difficult. I didn’t do that in part 1…but it lists for $950 at PyramydAir.com.

This will be a learning day, because the Lynx has a regulator. A regulator controls the air pressure and volume that’s available to the firing valve, so each shot gets almost exactly the same volume of air. That has two benefits — one obvious and the other subtle.

The obvious benefit is greater shot-to-shot consistency. On some air rifles, this can be as small as one or two foot-seconds across the entire usable fill, but that usually happens with lower-powered guns. Higher-powered guns may vary more, but they’ll still be relatively close.

While some unregulated guns get 10-shot strings with very close velocities — when you look at the entire fill, they can vary by hundreds of f.p.s. So, the second benefit is that you’ll get the same velocity throughout the entire part of the fill where the regulator is “on.” We saw that most recently when I shot the Talon SS with the Micro-Meter tank.

How the regulator works
The regulator is set to allow only a certain amount of air into the firing chamber. This is done by air pressure. When the firing chamber has the allotted pressure of air, it closes the reg so no more air can flow from the reservoir. As long as the pressure in the reg remains higher than the firing pressure, the gun will shoot very consistently. The firing valve is tuned to operate best on very low air pressure.

Falling off the reg
When the pressure remaining in the reservoir is not as great as the regulator’s adjusted pressure, the regulator stops working. We use the term “falling off the reg” when this happens. It’s very sudden and can be spotted immediately by a shooter with experience. From that shot on, all shots will diminish in power, though they may still retain enough power to be useful for quite a few more shots.

I’m not just interested in the power of the Lynx, but also the point it falls off the reg, as that determines the maximum number of useful shots you get from a fill. I’m also interested in how closely the onboard pressure gauge correlates with the regulator. In other words: Can I trust the needle on the gauge?

I selected three pellets to test today, because they’re the three I’ll choose for the accuracy test. I may use one or two other pellets later on, but these three will give us a good idea of the Lynx’s performance.

JSB Exact 15.9 grain
The Lynx I’m testing is in .22 caliber, so I selected the JSB Exact 15.9-grain pellet to test first. I did so because this has proven to be the most accurate pellet in the majority of PCPs I’ve tested in .22 caliber. The gun was filled to 3,000 psi and shooting commenced.


The gauge after two shots on a full fill.

The first shot went 923 f.p.s. After that, nothing went faster than 916 f.p.s. with this pellet. That first shot was needed to wake up the reg and the valve. I disregarded it for this test, except that I counted it in the total number 0f shots per fill. It was probably unnecessary to disregard it, as the velocity didn’t change that much; but with other guns I’ve tested, it does. This has become a habit for me.

The first string of 10 shots (discounting the very first shot) averaged 912 f.p.s. The string ranged from a low of 906 f.p.s. to a high of 916 f.p.s., so 10 foot-seconds was the total spread. At the average velocity, this pellet generated 29.37 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

Crosman Premier
Next up were 14.3-grain Crosman Premiers. They averaged 947 f.p.s. and had a spread from 939 to 953 f.p.s. That’s a 14 f.p.s. spread. At the average velocity, these pellets generated 28.48 foot-pounds, or just slightly less than the heavier JSBs. That’s what you would expect in a PCP, as they usually become more efficient with heavier pellets.

I expect Premiers to be accurate in the Lynx, but probably not quite as good as the JSBs. On the other hand, there’s another pellet that may challenge the JSB for the top spot. That pellet is the Beeman Kodiak.

Beeman Kodiak
Beeman Kodiak pellets are made by H&N. They’ve varied in weight over the past several years, so I weighed the pellets from the tin I was using in this test. These pellets averaged 21.1 grains. They averaged 825 f.p.s. in the Lynx with a spread that went from 821 to 829 f.p.s. They varied by only 8 foot-seconds across the entire string. At the average muzzle velocity, they produced 30.9 foot-pounds of energy. This may be the pellet to watch for accuracy.

More air!
After the Kodiak string, the rifle had fired a total of 31 shots since being filled. The needle was still in the green zone, so I ran another 10 JSB Exacts through the chronograph. This time, the average was 908 f.p.s., with a spread from 905 to 913 f.p.s. The rifle was still on the reg after 41 shots.

The needle on the gauge was now down close to the bottom edge of the green sector. But I kept on shooting to see what the total shot count would be before the gun fell off the reg.


The gauge after 41 shots on a fill. There are still some good shots, according to the needle.

The next shots registered as follows.

Shot…..Velocity
42………..913
43………..906
44………..909
45………..908
46………..906
47………..907
48………..907
49………..904 (Gun fell off the reg)
50………..888
51………..883


The gauge, three shots after the gun fell off the reg. The gauge on the test rifle is quite and can be trusted.

The Lynx I’m testing gets about 50 good shots per fill. Those shots are all around the 30 foot-pound range when medium-heavy pellets are used.

Discharge sound
The Lynx is very quiet for its power. This is a rifle that won’t bother most neighbors, unless they are laying in wait for you.

Trigger
The trigger is different because the first-stage pull has a lot of the weight in it. It takes some getting used to the rifle to feel stage two, but once you do it’s very positive. Stage two is totally free from creep, and there isn’t any travel after the release.

The first stage takes 2 lbs., 4 oz., then stage two breaks at 3 lbs., 5 oz. as the adjustment is set from the factory. I fiddled with the two screws that seem to affect the adjustment, but I didn’t get anywhere. One of them simply loosened the push-button safety, while the other introduced a third stage to the pull without affecting anything else. But the trigger is already very nice, so this wasn’t a problem.

Accuracy is next, and I’ve decided to divide it into two parts. First, I’ll sight-in at 25 yards and find the best pellet. Then, I’ll go out to 50 yards and see what this rifle can do. This should be an interesting test.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Announcement: Wesley Santiago is this week’s winner of Pyramyd Air’s Big Shot of the Week on their airgun facebook page. He’ll receive a $50 Pyramyd Air gift card. Congratulations!

Wesley Santiago submitted this week’s winning photo for BSOTW.


The Cometa Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Oh boy! Another new precharged air rifle to test! This one is called the Lynx V10 and is made by the Spanish firm of Cometaand distributed in the U.S. through AirForce International. Instead of offering these guns through AirForce Airguns, the company has elected to create a separate entity called AirForce International that will sell all the products that are not made in the United States. The Cometa line launches this endeavor.

The Lynx V10 has been seen in the U.S. previously but was represented by smaller dealers who sold whatever configuration the company made. AirForce International has requested specific standard specifications for the guns they sell, and they will have other exciting changes to announce in the future.

The rifle I’m testing for you today is the Lynx V10 — a .22-caliber 13-shot sidelever repeating precharged rifle. It takes a conventional 3,000 psi/206 bar fill of air in the 290cc reservoir. Although the reservoir appears to be removable, it can be left in place on the gun and filled through a standard male Foster-type filling in the bottom of the stock.


The reservoir remains in the rifle and is filled through a standard Foster male nipple! Note the onboard pressure gauge.

I’m testing serial number 30638-11, but you won’t be able to buy this one because I’ll have to return it to AirForce International, who supplied it for this test. They sent the rifle mounted with an AirForce 3-9×40 AO scope, so that’s how I’ll test it. I have both the single-shot adapter and a 13-shot magazine, so I’ll test both for you.

According to the AirForce International website, the rifle will deliver velocity from 700 to 1,000 f.p.s., depending on the weight of the pellet. So, I’m expecting power to be in the 30+ foot-pound region.

General description
The rifle I’m testing is mounted in a natural wood finish stock. The test rifle stock has a pleasing grain pattern and appears to be walnut, though the specifications do not list it. Other stock finishes of blue and black are available.

The rifle weighs 9.5 lbs. as tested, with the scope mounted and single-shot adapter installed. The advertised weight of just the rifle alone is 7.8 lbs.

It is 41.3 inches in length and has a pull length of just under 15-1/2 inches. That pull may be too long for many shooters. I find it very comfortable, but I do like a longer pull. The black rubber buttpad adds an inch to the stock. If you need to trim the pull, that’s the place to start.

The stock is completely ambidextrous, and only the sidelever on the right side of the receiver and the fact that the single-shot adapter swings out to the right for loading shows any bias whatsoever. The comb has a very tall and sharp Monte Carlo profile, and the cheekpiece is subtly raised on both sides of the butt. Both sides of the grip and forearm are covered with attractive checkering.


The sidelever cocks the action and the single-shot adapter can then rotate out to the side for loading.

The forearm is quite wide, while the butt is surprisingly narrow in cross-section. The forearm, though, has to house the back part of the air reservoir, so the wide forearm does not add any weight to the gun. The resulting feel of the rifle is that it’s large but not overly heavy — at least so far. The pressure gauge is inset into the left side of the forearm, where it’s easy to read.

The barrel is shrouded and has a bull-barrel look. I’ll report on the sound at firing after I’ve tested it indoors for velocity, and perhaps again after accuracy testing outdoors. The fat shroud should be able to do an effective job. While the test rifle does not contain any baffles, there’s a large collection chamber in front of the true muzzle — not unlike what’s found in the production Talon SS.

Trigger
The trigger is two-stage and adjustable for pull weight. The one on the test rifle seems to be adjusted perfectly. I plan to leave it alone until I shoot the rifle for accuracy, because it’s right where I want it. Stage one has some weight to it, and stage two breaks glass-crisp.

The cost
This is a sophisticated PCP, make no mistake. The reservoir is regulated, and the power is adjustable. I’ll explore the latter after accuracy testing, but the former will come to the forefront when I report the shot count. Many of you have asked about the utility of a regulator — well this rifle has one and now we’ll see how well it works.

So, yes, the Lynx V10 is pricey, but before we close our minds, let’s see what it has to offer. It should be on par with the Air Arms S510 and similar European PCPs.

Cometas are coming!
This Lynx is just the first of a flood of Cometa airguns that are coming from AirForce International. Next week, I’ll begin a report on another exciting new gun. But focusing on the Lynx for now, I plan to chew on this report a little longer than the usual three reports — both because the brand is new to many of you and also because the Lynx has so many performance features that deserve to be fully tested. So, sit back and enjoy the ride!

NEW: Dan Wesson pellet revolvers!
Dan Wesson pellet revolvers

You wanted Dan Wesson revolvers that could shoot pellets, so we ordered them. Six-shot pellet shooters that so closely copy the firearm, you'll be stunned by the realism. An excellent way to hone trigger control and maintain accuracy with your firearm -- without range fees, expensive ammo or leaving your house. Pre-order yours now. Get it. Shoot it. Love it!

Ka-BOOM!
Airburst MegaBoom reactive targets

Airburst MegaBoom bases transform ordinary plastic soda & water bottles into booming targets that deliver up to 150 decibels when punctured. Get the base and charge your own plastic bottles or get the MegaBoom bottles filled with BoomDust that mists like smoke when the bottle is punctured. Low-pressure air pump and blast guard accessories also available. A real blast!

Archives