Posts Tagged ‘single-shot’

Our own Christmas story

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Merry Christmas, everyone! I hope this day finds you in good spirits, no matter where you are or what you are doing.

I have a special report just for this special day. It involves a BB gun, Daisy’s Avanti Champion 499 — also known as the world’s most accurate BB gun.

Daisy Avanti Champion 499
Daisy’s Avanti Champion 499 is the world’s most accurate BB gun.

About a month ago, my buddy Otho was visiting my house, and I pulled out my 499 to show him. I’d told him about it while we were at the rifle range the week before and he was fascinated, though he later admitted that he didn’t believe me when I told him how accurate it is. So, I took this opportunity not just to show him the gun, but to let him shoot it.

We made a quick BB gun range in my garage using the UTG BB and pellet trap with some 5-meter BB gun targets taped to the cardboard target backer on the front of the trap. I showed Otho how to raise the bottom front of the trap so that all the BBs that entered would stay inside because they roll to the back after they stop moving. And the ballistic curtains will take most of the energy out of each BB on the first pass through the trap.

Daisy Avanti Champion 499 UTG Accushot trap
The UTG BB trap is the only BB trap available with replaceable ballistic curtains.

A muzzleloader!
Otho was captivated by the fact that the 499 is a muzzleloading single-shot. While it looks a lot like a Red Ryder, it couldn’t be more different! The gun is loaded by dropping one BB down the muzzle, which is shaped like a funnel. The BB rolls down the precision tubing that serves as the barrel, and it takes from 2 to 5 seconds to be captured by a magnet at the bottom. A faint click announces this. The magnet allows the shooter to hold the gun in any orientation without fear of the BB rolling out.

Daisy Avanti Champion 499 muzzleloading
Load just 1 BB at a time by dropping it into the funnel-shaped muzzle and listening to it slowly roll down the barrel until it clicks against the magnet.

I told Otho to listen to the BB roll down and be captured by the magnet. That’s the only way to be sure the gun’s been loaded properly. He was fascinated by this and quickly learned to do it every time. His background in machining gave him an appreciation of just how uniform that barrel and BB had to be to make the short trip last so long!

Precision ground shot
Accompanying the 499 is a special BB that’s as precise as the gun. It used to have the model number 515, but today it’s just labeled Avanti Precision Ground Shot. It’s sold in small packs of 1050 and costs considerably more than standard BBs, but it makes a difference in the 499. You can shoot regular BBs in the 499, but they’re smaller and they roll down the barrel faster. During loading, you will see the roll time down the barrel decrease to as little as a half-second for Crosman Copperhead BBs to 1.5 seconds for Daisy Premium-grade zinc-plated BBs. Accuracy results will reflect the roll time, as that’s the best indication of the size and uniformity of each steel sphere.

Daisy Avanti Champion 499 Precision Ground Shot
Daisy’s Avanti Precision Ground Shot is the only ammo to use in the 499. It’s far superior to regular BBs.

Sights
Daisy used to sell this gun with a cheaper rear peep sight that was difficult to adjust with precision. The sight that now comes standard on the gun was an option at that time. Finally they decided to just include the better sight and raise the price a little to cover it. While this sight is made largely of plastic, it’s still capable of precision adjustments. To eliminate slop in the mechanism, turn it several clicks in the direction opposite of where you wish to adjust; then, when you return, the slop will be taken out of the parts and the adjustment will be right on.

The front sight accepts inserts. Most shooters select the same one — an aperture that encircles the bull at 5 meters.

Proof of the pudding
A real shooter knows that the only thing that matters is what the gun does downrange. Fancy wood and deep bluing don’t mean a thing if the gun can’t shoot. So, naturally, Otho had to try his hand. The target was set as close to the regulation 5 meters from the firing line as it’s possible to get in my garage. We were probably at 15 feet, instead of 16 feet 5 inches, but it didn’t matter because we weren’t shooting for record. His first 5 shots produced a group smaller than any he had ever shot with a BB gun, but it did much more that just that. It awakened his rifleman’s spirit! Here was a gun that could shoot better than he could — guaranteed!

His eyelids dropped into a squint that broadcast concentration. His next 5 shots all landed in the same place and were all on the bullseye. The room now grew quiet as his concentration ratcheted up another notch.

Another 5 shots went downrange, and this time he was really trying. The smaller hole in this target reflected the attempt! The gun is apparently a perfect gauge of the effort that’s put into it! The heavens opened and a shaft of divinely-inspired sunlight bathed the shooter in glory. Otho was hooked! He now understood what I had been trying to tell him. The Daisy Avanti Champion 499 is the world’s most accurate BB gun! It is the gun that every real shooter hopes to find one day — one that can out-shoot him and will never be finicky. Do your best and the gun reflects it on target — pure and simple.

Daisy Avanti Champion 499 target
This is what the 499 can do at 5 meters. Ten shots in this group!

A Christmas story
This is where Otho had his epiphany. He went home and immediately ordered a Daisy Avanti Champion 499 for himself. On my recommendation, he also ordered several packs of Precision Ground Shot, plus I gave him a pack to get started since Pyramyd Air was temporarily backordered when he placed his order. He also bought 5-meter paper targets and a UTG target trap. In short, he purchased a complete shooting kit that had everything he needed to get started.

Three days later he called to tell me his gun had arrived, and he was already shooting the BBs I had given him. The day after that he called to tell me that he had ordered 3 additional shooting kits as Christmas gifts for his son, son-in-law and another friend. A week later he told me that he had taken his gun to his country home, where he stayed indoors and shot targets all day while his friends and family sat out in cold wet high seats, awaiting the deer that never showed.

Then, on December 23, Otho called me one more time to tell me he was purchasing one more gift set for another friend who hadn’t shown any interest until the day before. His gift will arrive late, but it will be just as appreciated, I’m sure.

Otho never told me, but I am reasonably sure that he takes his new BB gun to bed with him every night, drifting off to sleep while shooting ducks on the wing and getting off spectacular hipshots. I think this little Daisy might be the greatest Christmas gift he will ever get or give, and it is our own version of A Christmas Story. Merry Christmas!

Testing a Diana model 23 breakbarrel rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3



Diana 23
Not as pretty as I would like. This Diana 23 has led a hard life. I’ll refinish it.

Today, we’ll return to an oldie we haven’t looked at in close to 2 months — the Diana 23. You may remember this is a rifle I bought for very little from an online auction — and when it arrived, I found it was better than expected. The finish is gone, but I plan to refinish it. And Larry Hannusch generously donated a brand-new old-stock Diana 23 barrel for the project, so I’m farther along than might be expected.

Last time, we tested the rifle at 10 meters and found that it showed decent accuracy for such a low-powered air rifle. Today, I’m pushing that out to 25 yards with 2 of the best pellets from the last test, plus a new one I’ve thrown into the mix. The goal is to see if this little vintage springer is accurate enough for general plinking duty out to 75 feet.

Days like this are always relaxing for 2 reasons. The first is that I’m testing something that’s no longer available, so there are no company reputations on the line. I enjoy testing airguns, but it’s disturbing to read all the sniping negative comments we receive when things don’t go exactly perfect. It makes me feel like I have failed the gun somehow, and that’s nerve-wracking.

The second reason a day like today is a pleasure is that the gun, itself, is such a little sweetie. The Diana 23 is lightweight and easy to cock. The trigger is certainly not world-class, but it releases with a reasonable pull; and, if the gun is also accurate with open sights, all the better.

The hold
I find when I shoot light low-powered airguns like the 23, the artillery hold isn’t so important. I grasp the rifle tighter than a real artillery hold, though not as tight as I would hold a recoling centerfire. Maybe something more like a rimfire hold. The rifle seems to respond okay to this treatment.

JSB Exact RS
The first pellet I tried was the JSB Exact RS dome. They did well in the 10-meter test that I read before starting this one. I noted that deep-seated pellets did best in that test, so all pellets in this test were seated with the Air Venturi Pellet Pen and Pellet Seater. The RS pellets fit the bore very well and were not tight going into the breech as they were seated. They hit the target high and just a little to the right when I held the tip of the front sight on the 6 o’clock spot of the black bull. I used the standard 10-meter pistol target because it appears large enough for open sights all the way out to 50 yards.

The group I got measures 1.16 inches between the 2 furthest centers. I’m quite satisfied with that group, except for the centering. The way the 23′s sights are made, I’ll have to drift either the front or rear sight in their dovetails to correct where the pellets land; and since I’m going to change the barrel, I decided to wait and see where the new one shoots.

Diana 23 JSB RS group 25 yards
Ten JSB RS pellets made this 1.16-inch group at 25 yards. It’s a little large; but for such a small rifle — and with open sights, I’m satisfied.

Air Arms Falcon
The second pellet I tried was the Air Arms Falcon that blog reader Kevin Lentz likes so much. They’re made by JSB and weigh the same as the RS pellets, so the temptation is to think they’re RS pellets under a different name. But I don’t think that’s the case. The late Bill Saunders of Air Arms told me that Air Arms owns the dies for all their pellets; and even though JSB makes them, they’re not simply rebranded pellets. If anything, Falcons fit the bore a little looser than RS pellets.

At any rate, Falcons didn’t do as well as RS pellets in the Diana 23. Ten of them made a group that measures 1.568 inches between centers. This group appears not to have 10 shots in it, but several pellets must have gone through the same hole at the top of the group because I counted each shot carefully.

Diana 23 Air Arms Falcon group 25 yards
Ten Air Arms Falcon pellets made this 1.568-inch group at 25 yards. This is larger than I would like. I think I’ll stick to the RS pellets for this rifle.

RWS Hobby
The final pellet I tried was the RWS Hobby wadcutter. They fit the bore very snug and popped in when seated. Though they were at the outside limit of distance for accuracy (wadcutters start to spread apart after 25 yards), they performed very well — delivering the smallest group of this test. Ten pellets went into 1.014 inches at 25 yards. With that kind of accuracy, I would stick with the Hobbys that are less expensive than the other premium pellets anyway. Sure, the accuracy falls off as the distance increases, but how much farther do I expect to shoot this rifle? Not much!

Diana 23 RWS Hobby group 25 yards
Ten RWS Hobby pellets went into 1.014 inches at 25 yards. This is great accuracy for such a small rifle and open sights.

That’s all I’m going to test for now. Next comes the refinish and then whatever I do as I put the rifle back together. It’s a fun little gun. I wish there were more like it!

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Umarex Fusion rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today, we’ll test the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle at 25 yards. And today was also supposed to be the day I tested how long you have to wait to remove the CO2 cap after exhausting the gas. That’s not going to happn, though; because when I took off the CO2 cap to install 2 fresh CO2 cartridges, I noticed the o-ring was damaged pretty bad. So bad, in fact, that it might not work any longer. I switched it for a common black Buna o-ring of the same size and then charged the gun. At the end of this report, I’ll tell you how that works.

Umarex Fusion rifle damaged o-ring
The original o-ring had these two damaged spots. I thought it might leak, so I replaced it.

JSB Exact RS
When I tested the rifle at 10 meters, the best pellet was the JSB Exact RS dome, so that was the first pellet I tested this time. As I predicted after shimming the rear scope ring, the rifle was hitting too high at 25 yards. I had to drop it about 2-1/2 inches and move it to the right about three-quarters of an inch.

The first 10-shot group I fired measures 0.523 inches between centers. It’s nice and round, also. Remember, I’m using the 4x scope that came with the rifle, so the bullseyes looked pretty small at 25 yards. Also keep in mind that this shooting was done indoors, so wind is not a factor.

Umarex Fusion rifle JSB Exact RS group 1
These 10 JSB Exact RS pellets made a 0.523-inch group at 25 yards.

The first group looked so good through my spotting scope that I shot a second one with the same RS pellets. This time, 9 of the pellets went into 0.455-inches, but one shot opened the group to 0.688 inches. That wild shot was not a called flier; it just went astray.

Umarex Fusion rifle JSB Exact RS group 2

This second group of JSB Exact RS pellets measures 0.688 inches between centers.

H&N Baracuda Match
The second-best pellet at 10 meters was the H&N Baracuda Match, so that was the next pellet I tried. Ten landed in a 0.625-inch group that’s open but fairly round at the same time. Looking through the scope, this group didn’t look very promising; but I see upon inspection that it isn’t much worse than the first 2 groups.

Umarex Fusion rifle HN Baracuda group
Ten H&N Baracuda Match pellets went into 0.625 inches at 25 yards.

Air Arms Falcon
The final pellet of the day was the Air Arms Falcon dome, which is made by JSB. Sometimes, this pellet surprises me with stellar accuracy. This time, 10 pellets made a group that measured 0.56 inches between centers. It’s very close to the first group of JSB Exact RS pellets, which turned out to be the best group of the day.

Umarex Fusion rifle Falcon group 2
Ten Air Arms Falcon pellets went into 0.56 inches. It was the second-best group of the day.

The new o-ring
The new o-ring worked, but there was some leakage when I pierced the cartridges. The gas exhaust screw wasn’t the culprit this time — it was the o-ring that leaked. I suspect I selected a ring that is too thin for the job. When I removed the cap, I saw that this ring had also absorbed the gas and swollen quite large. I took a picture of it 5 minutes after taking it out of the gun and again after 45 minutes, so you can see the dramatic difference as the o-ring outgasses and shrinks back to normal.

Umares Fusion rifle new o-ring after 5 minutes
The o-ring after 5 minutes out of the gun. It’s still swollen with absorbed CO2.

Umares Fusion rifle new o-ring after 45 minutes
The o-ring after 45 minutes out of the gun.

Final evaluation
There’s a lot to like about the Fusion air rifle. It certainly is accurate, and it fully delivers on the promise of quiet operation. There aren’t many other air rifles in this price range that can compete. Even the scope that comes with the rifle seems to be up to the task.

While today’s groups are not stunning, they’re all good.  It’s interesting to note they’re all under three-quarters of an inch and some approach a half inch.

I do think the o-ring that comes with the rifle needs to be changed to something that doesn’t swell. And it would be nice if the trigger was more adjustable. But those are small points. If you’re looking for a fun plinker that’s both quiet and accurate, put this one on your list!

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Umarex Fusion rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today is the first accuracy test of the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle. It comes one part late because we spent time looking at the CO2 cap, the adjustable trigger and the power adjuster in Part 3. The power adjuster is straightforward — twist the screw in and increase the striker spring tension to increase power. The trigger, we learned, is adjustable, but the safety slider prevents a very wide range of adjustability. You can modify it if you choose, but I don’t recommend it; and it will void any warranty on the gun. Blog reader mikeiniowa explained how it’s done, but he said to use caution — and I don’t intend doing it to the test gun.

You should now understand how the CO2 cap works, but there’s one additional thing that I think needs to be stressed. The gas exhaust screw on the cap is to use after the CO2 has been depleted. Screw it in and exhaust the remaining pressure. But that isn’t the end because the cap still cannot be taken off safely, as a reader mentioned yesterday. The o-ring that absorbs gas has to be given a lot of time to exhaust that gas and shrink back down to normal size before you attempt to remove the cap. If you try to remove the cap too soon after exhausting the gas, the o-ring will still be swollen and tightly wedged in place. You could tear it if you use too much force on the cap. So, let an hour or two pass before you try to remove the cap; and leave the exhaust screw screwed in, so the remaining gas that leaves the o-ring can get out of the gun. Anyone who has ever owned a Schimel CO2 pistol knows what I am talking about because they had the same problem.

Mounting the scope
The Fusion comes with a 4X32 scope and rings that must be mounted on the gun. The rings are made to clear the rounded receiver top, so don’t think just any rings will work. I want to show you what one of the rings looks like after installation, so you don’t go nuts thinking it’s not on the gun squarely.

Umarex Fusion rifle scope ring
The Fusion receiver is rounded on top, so the bottom of the scope ring must be profiled to clear the hump. The rings that come with the gun are correctly shaped for this. Don’t let the cockeyed jaw piece fool you — this ring is on the rifle straight and tight!

The scope caps have 2 screws each, which is perfect for this gun. There’s no recoil, so 2 screws hold the scope tight enough for good accuracy.

Once the scope was mounted, I sighted-in at 10 meters. All of today’s shooting will be from 10 meters for reasons I will explain as we go. I’m telling you that because the groups will be smaller than if they were shot at 25 yards. I do plan on testing the Fusion at 25 yards, too, but first I have to establish what it can do closer.

One additional thing about the sight-in. All the pellets struck the target low at 10 meters. I accepted that for the whole test, and I had to adjust the scope up very high to even get that. You know how nervous that makes me! So, at the end of this test I’ll shim the rear scope ring and try one more group with the best pellet. The groups you’ll be seeing are either low on the bull or just beneath it.

JSB Exact RS
The first group was shot with the JSB Exact RS pellet. As I shot, I could see all the pellets going into the same place; although with the 4x scope, it wasn’t easy to see exactly how good it was until I went downrange. It turned out that 10 pellets made a 0.286-inch group, measured between centers. And this group is very round, which is a good sign that everything is right with the rifle.

Umarex Fusion rifle JSB Exact group
Ten JSB Exact RS pellets made this 0.286-inch group at 10 meters. Remember — this is only 10 meters, so the groups are going to be smaller. But this is a great group!

I observed several things while shooting the first group. The first is the trigger, while having a very long second stage pull that you can feel, is very controllable. Next, I did find the rifle just a bit fiddly to load. Once I got the hang of it, however, I was able to load pretty fast. But the pellets tend to flip around in the trough — especially the domes!

And, finally, I noted how very quiet the Fusion is! Our female cat, who usually walks around the house complaining every time I shoot, found it hard to hear what I was doing unless she was in the room with me. Even then, the noise didn’t seem to bother her, though Edith did say she walked into her office to complain once. Other than that, she was quiet. I think any apartment-dweller could shoot this rifle indoors without bothering the neighbors.

H&N Baracuda Match
Next, it was time to test the H&N Baracuda Match pellets. They landed higher on the target than the RS pellets but were still below the point of aim. This group measured 0.345 inches and was just as round as the RS group.

Umarex Fusion rifle HN Baracuda group
Ten H&N Baracuda Match pellets made this 0.345-inch group at 10 meters. Once again, the group is round and quite small.

Crosman SSP hollowpoint
Then I tried the lightweight lead-free Crosman SSP hollowpoint. I didn’t expect much from these pellets, but I tried them because I’d used them in the velocity test. They produced a 10-shot group that measures 1.66 inches between centers. Obviously, I’m not going to shoot this pellet at 25 yards and risk hitting the walls of my house or the furniture! This is why I started shooting at 10 meters.

Umarex Fusion rifle Grosman SSP hollowpoint group
Ten Crosman SSP hollowpoint lead-free pellets went into 1.66 inches at 10 meters. Several seem to have gone through while tumbling. Not the pellet for the Fusion!

RWS Hobby
The last pellet I tested was the RWS Hobby wadcutter. Ten went into 0.59 inches at 10 meters. But the first pellet went to the left of the next 9, so I think this might be one of those times when conditioning the bore was required for best results. Not that I believe in that theory, mind you, but this time it really looked like that’s what was happening. The 9 pellets went into 0.36 inches — a much better showing! The Hobby is the third best pellet in the test, but I think the group of 9 is more representative of what it can do.

Umarex Fusion rifle RWS Hobby group
Ten RWS Hobbys went into 0.59 inches, but the last 9 went into a much tighter 0.36 inches.

The JSB Exact RS and the H&N Baracuda Match are the 2 pellets I’ll test at 25 yards. I would include the Hobbys, but 25 yards is right where wadcutters start to spread out, so I’ll just go with the 2 domes. However, there’s still one more thing to try today.

I removed the scope and put one plastic shim on the bottom of the rear ring under the scope tube, then installed the scope again. I went back to 10 meters without any sight-in shots and shot one more group with JSB Exact RS pellets. The group moved up over 1-1/4 inches and over to the left by a half-inch. This is where I will begin shooting at 25 yards, knowing that I’ll probably need to decrease the elevation to get back on target. Isn’t that interesting, that the point of impact moved up so much with a single shim? The shim measured 0.013 inches, by the way.

Umarex Fusion rifle JSB Exact group after shimming
Ten JSB Exact RS pellets went into 0.244 inches at 10 meters. It’s the best group of the day! This group was fired after a 0.013-inch shim was placed between the scope and the rear ring. The scope was then simply remounted and no sight-in was done. This group is about 1.30 inches higher than the first group. It also appears to be smaller, but the dark paper hides the true size of the pellets.

Impressions so far
The Fusion is a winner! I like everything about it. It has taken some time to understand; but now that we’ve been through the design and know what to expect, you show me another air rifle that costs $170 and shoots like this one. We’re talking groups very similar to what vintage 10-meter target rifles can produce.

No — it’s not a good rifle for hunting; and, no, I don’t think it can be modified to become one. If that’s what you want, get a Discovery. Leave the Fusion as it is — a nice, quiet, accurate rifle.

25-yard testing yet to come.

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Umarex Fusion rifle

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Part 3 of most reports is the day we test accuracy. Sometimes, we test accuracy more than one time; but Part 3 is usually when we test it for the first time. But that isn’t going to happen today. Blog reader mikeiniowa told us that the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle rifle has both adjustable power and an adjustable trigger. I said I would look at that in detail when we got to it. Well, today’s the day.

The CO2 cap assembly
Before I get to either of those things, however, I want to talk about the CO2 cap in detail. I promised I would show you how this works, so I’m going to take it apart and show you the internals. I’ll also try to describe why the cap is as complex as it is.

Umarex Fusion rifle CO2 cap assembly
The Fusion CO2 cap disassembled. The parts are described below.

Let’s examine the parts, starting at the right of the above image. That rounded cap is the cover for the gas exhaust screw. It has left-hand threads, so you must remember that because it’s made of plastic and can easily be stripped. Next to that is the threaded metal cap that holds the CO2 cap assembly to the rifle when there’s pressure in the gun. One of our readers noted that this threaded metal cap is separate from the main CO2 cap assembly. It has to be made that way because of the o-ring. When gas is in the gun, the o-ring swells and will not permit the CO2 cap to be removed. If the threaded cover was attached to the main cap assembly, it would be locked in place until the o-ring finally returned to normal size — you couldn’t even turn it. Back in the 1960s, it sometimes took days and even weeks to get the CO2 cap out of some guns because of the way they were designed! The threaded cap retaining ring, as I call it, was created to allow the cap to be removed when the main cap was frozen in place from internal pressure.

Crosman came up with the idea of making this threaded retaining ring separate from the main cap assembly. That allowed the threaded ring to be taken off the gun, and then the main cap assembly could be removed from the gun by wiggling it from side to side. That one change reduced the time to remove the CO2 cap from days to minutes! The Fusion uses the same design to achieve the same result. But if the o-ring didn’t swell in the presence of the gas, this type of design wouldn’t be necessary.

The pressure-relief screw seen above the first 2 parts on the cap pushes against the brass part seen to the left. That opens a way for the gas to escape. The coiled spring holds the brass valve seat shut at all other times. This is why it is important to back off the pressure-relief screw when piercing the CO2 cartridges.

The long part with the orange o-ring around it is the main cap body that all the other parts assemble to. As seen in the picture, it’s a hollow plastic tube. And the part to the extreme left houses the piercing pin. Though the part is plastic, the piercing pin is a metal insert.

Umarex Fusion rifle piercing pin
The piercing pin inside the plastic cap is a metal insert.

Trigger and power adjustment
Okay, now we understand the CO2 cap, let’s look at the adjustments on the gun. To get to them, the action has to be removed from the stock, and it isn’t as straightforward as it is on some guns. The forearm has one screw at the bottom front. Once it’s out, the trigger unit has come out. That’s where it gets complex. The rear screw fastens a separate piece of plastic at the back of the triggerguard and holds the rifle to the stock. Take it out, and the barreled action is loose in the stock; but 2 more trigger screws have to be removed.

Once the trigger unit was outside the gun, I saw what it is — a unitized trigger that is highly based on the Crosman 160s trigger. It isn’t a copy, but it works the same with most of the same parts. Only the safety slide is different.

Umarex Fusion rifle CO2 cap assemblyCrosman 160 CO2 rifle crossbow trigger nut
From Sir Ralph Payne-Gallwey’s book, “The Crossbow,” (published in 1903) this illustration of a 15th century crossbow nut shows how a great force can be overcome by a smaller one.

Crosman 160 CO2 rifle trigger graphicFrom the Beeman R1 Supermagnum Air Rifle book.

Umarex Fusion rifle trigger
I didn’t have to open the Fusion trigger to see that it’s very similar to the Crosman 160 trigger.

Umarex Fusion rifle trigger sear adjustment
Apologies for the blurry image. Like the Crosman 160 trigger, the sear engagement is adjusted by the small screw at the top. There’s no screw in the hole below that, which is the trigger overtravel adjustment. The large Allen screw at the bottom adjusts the trigger return-spring tension, which is the weight of the pull.

Umarex Fusion rifle trigger sear adjustment from top
The threaded sear adjustment screw is shown at the right (arrow).

I tried adjusting the trigger, but apparently I don’t know the secret, if there is one. I couldn’t take the second-stage creep out of the sear without making it impossible to cock the rifle. I settled for lightening the pull to 3 lbs., 5 oz. But the trigger still had a lot of second-stage creep.

I’m hoping mikeiniowa will tell me that I missed the trigger optimization screw that fixes everything; because each time I adjusted the trigger, I had to assemble the rifle in the stock to test it. I bet there’s more to this trigger than I’ve discovered. And, of course, none of this is in the manual!

The power adjustment is very straightforward. Simply tighten or loosen tension on the striker spring with a screw located at the rear of the receiver.

Umarex Fusion rifle power adjustment
The power adjustment screw and locking nut are located at the rear of the receiver.

Observations
The Fusion has some interesting designs, but I don’t think they were done by an airgunner. Each area shows a lot of attention to detail, but the complexity of the CO2 cap shows the designers were either unaware of the advances that have been made in CO2 gun technology, or for some reason they thought this was the best way to design it.

The trigger shows potential, but I obviously don’t know how to make it sing. I hope somebody will take me to school.

Given the complexity of working on the Fusion, I can see why the instructions for these adjustments were left out of the manual. If you are smart enough to find them, I guess you’re qualified to adjust them!

Accuracy is next!

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Umarex Fusion rifle

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today, we test the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle for velocity and several other things you readers are interested in. You may remember that in the first part I had a problem with the rifle not sealing when I loaded the CO2 cartridges. Blog reader mikeiniowa nailed the problem with the Fusion CO2 cap. The part that contains the piercing pin was partially unscrewed and was, therefore, longer than it should be. It was piercing the cartridges before the o-ring was in position to seal the gun. So, a lot of gas leaked out; and, because the o-ring absorbs CO2 and swells when it does, it also prevented the cap from being screwed down tight.

Fusion CO2 cap
In the top photo, the Fusion cap is unscrewed almost all the way. On the bottom is the cap properly together.

I’m going to show that cap in detail in a later report. It’s made so complex because of the material the o-ring is made from. If a different material had been used, none of the complex parts would be needed…and the cap could be made for less cost.

So, with the cap assembled correctly, I was able to load 2 fresh CO2 cartridges. This time, everything worked as it should, and the velocity test began.

JSB Exact RS
The first pellet I tried was the 7.3-grain JSB Exact RS. This lightweight dome is a winner in many lower-powered air rifles, and I believe the Fusion will be one of them. The first shots started slow, at 619, 647 and 644 f.p.s. Then, the velocity jumped up to 663 and remained above that number for the remainder of the string. The average, once the velocity was in the curve, was 667 f.p.s.  That means the Fusion’s valve needs to be awakened after installing fresh cartridges.

The low velocity, once the pellet had climbed into the stable spread, was 663 f.p.s., and the high was 673 f.p.s. At the average velocity, the RS pellet produced 7.21 foot-pounds of muzzle energy. Because the Fusion is a gas gun, we can expect the power to increase and decrease with the pellet weight.

I tested the same pellet several hours later, and the first JSB RS out the spout went 686 f.p.s., so the velocity had increased by 20 f.p.s. after 40 shots had been fired and the gun then rested for 3 hours. But that was also the end of the power curve. By shot 50, the velocity of all the pellets started to drop again.

RWS Hobby
The second pellet I tried was the 7-grain RWS Hobby wadcutter. They averaged 669 f.p.s. with a spread from 661 to 681 f.p.s. At the average velocity, this pellet generated 6.96 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. Lighter pellet, less energy.

Crosman SSP hollowpoints
The third pellet I tested was the Crosman SSP hollowpoint. Remember, Umarex lists the velocity of the Fusion at 750 f.p.s. with lead-free pellets (which they call alloy) and 700 f.p.s. with lead pellets. I should have tested the rifle with RWS HyperMAX since those are the ones Umarex imports and distributes, but I didn’t have any on hand. Anyway, the Crosman pellets worked fine. They gave an average 766 f.p.s. velocity, with a low of 757 and a high of 783 f.p.s. At the average velocity, this 4-grain pellet produced 5.21 foot-pounds of muzzle energy, so it’s staying on track for the pellet-weight-to-velocity relationship.

After 50 shots had been fired, the average velocity for this pellet fell to 711 f.p.s. So, the velocity is going down, but the velocity is still useable up to 60 shots.

H&H Baracuda
The last pellet I tried was the 10.6-grain H&N Baracuda Match. In a spring gun, the velocity for this pellet would fall off quite a bit from the numbers for these lightweight pellets, but gas guns and pneumatics are different. Heavy pellets don’t lose nearly as much velocity as they do in spring guns. The average for Baracudas was 612 f.p.s. The range went from 600 to 616 f.p.s. At the average velocity, the Baracuda produced 8.82 foot-pounds, which is significantly higher than any other pellet.

One of our readers mentioned that the total number of good shots he gets is about 70 shots with each set of CO2 cartridges. I was looking for about that number. I noticed the velocity began dropping at shot 50. But there were still 10 more good shots in the gun. From shots 56 through 60, the velocity for the baseline JSB Exact RS pellets was 622, 614, 603, 602, and 584 f.p.s. While there were still more shots to be fired, I felt that accuracy would probably drop off at this point. So, I’ll rate the Fusion I’m testing as a 60-shot gun.

Noise?
And, now, we come to the question on everyone’s mind. Is the Fusion quiet? Umarex not only says that it is, they tout the low sound level heavily in their advertising campaigns. While I don’t have any scientific sound measurement equipment to test with, I can make a fairly good subjective observation of the gun’s report. I compared it to my Diana model 23, which most of you readers know to be a very small, low-powered spring-piston youth model air gun. The Fusion and the Diana 23 are approximately the same loudness. That means that the Fusion is a very quiet air rifle.

Blog reader Matt61 wondered if it would be louder than a ballpoint pen falling on a thick carpet, and I must say that it is. But it isn’t much louder. I think this is a gun you could shoot in an apartment that has thin walls separating you from the neighbors. You should be able to shoot in even small backyards without disturbing the neighborhood.

Trigger
I told you the trigger is 2-stage. Stage 1 is light and relatively short. Stage 2 is also light but long and creepy. The sear releases at around 3 lbs., 12 oz.

What’s left?
Besides the accuracy test, which is expected, I also want to take the gun out of its stock and look for both the power adjuster and the trigger adjustment that reader mikeiniowa mentioned. I’ll use that report to also show you the details of the CO2 cap and explain how it works so you understand what’s going on.

Given the power level of the Fusion, I think I’ll start testing accuracy at 10 meters and then back up to 25 yards. If the rifle comes through the accuracy portion with honors, I’ll give it a hearty recommendation.

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

 

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle.

One of the perks of visiting the manufacturer is getting to try new airguns. I visited Umarex USA last February to film my parts for this year’s American Airgunner show, and we were also given a tour of the facility in Fort Smith, Arkansas. We got to shoot many airguns and even a couple firearms, but the one gun that wasn’t quite ready was today’s subject gun, the .177-caliber Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle. Sales Director Justin Biddle (JB) told us the gun was going to be incredibly quiet. I really wanted to hear it perform, but it wasn’t going to happen because the gun just wasn’t ready.

Shouting about silence
Well, now I have a Fusion rifle in hand, and I get to test it all I want! I’m testing rifle number 00360129. Like all Fusions, this rifle comes in .177 caliber.

I told JB back in February that Pyramyd Air was very particular about the sound ratings shown with the descriptions on their website because, sometimes, they’re all a customer has to go by when buying an airgun. As the saying goes, “Once burned, twice shy,” so if there’s any question, no sound rating is accepted unless the Pyramyd Air tech team or I get to listen to the discharge of a production gun. We don’t want the customer who may be making his once-every-five-years purchase to be misled!

But I have to tell you — the box this rifle comes in touts the 5-chamber SilenceAir silencer attached to the barrel, and the rifle’s ultra-quiet operation is mentioned at least once on most of the box sides. They’ve gone so far as to put a video ad on the Pyramyd Air website, touting how quiet the rifle is. So, in all likelihood it is very quiet. Because, if it isn’t, it would open the door to a tidal wave of criticism! I’m prepared to be amazed.

There are other reasons for wanting to test the new Fusion, as well. It isn’t every day I get to see a new CO2 rifle. They don’t come along that often, and each new one seems different than the few we already have — unlike the introduction of yet another 1,400 f.p.s. breakbarrel magnum springer!

The rifle is a bolt-action single-shot, so in my mind that puts it in the Tech Force 78 category. Pyramyd Air no longer carries that model, and there are very few single-shot CO2 rifles to be had.

The rifle
Even though the black stock is synthetic, the Fusion is not a featherweight. It weighs 5.71 lbs., which is certainly light enough, but it’s also enough weight to let you know there’s something in your hands. I would call this a handy rifle, in that sense. The dimensions are large enough for an adult (14-inch pull), yet the stock is also thin where you naturally grab it; so, think of this as the Diana 27 of CO2 rifles.

The rifle is just over 40 inches in length and balances with a slight bias toward the muzzle. The silencer is one inch in diameter and permanently attached to the rifle. The rifled steel barrel is a whisker over 17 inches long, and ends where the baffled silencer begins. It appears free-floated, but it does contact a barrel band that attaches it to the CO2 tube below.

The entire rifle is matte black. The stock is dull, and the barreled receiver is blued to a matte black sheen.

The bolt requires a fairly stiff pull to cock the action, so you’ll want the rifle against your shoulder or something firm when you shoot. A tray in the receiver accepts the pellet and helps guide it into the breech.

Umarex Fusion rifle pellet tray
There is a pellet tray in the receiver, similar to what a single-shot .22 rimfire uses to guide the cartridge into the chamber.

The buttstock has a very straight line — as opposed to a stock that drops at the comb. Therefore, it will accept a scope more readily than most rifles. The stock fits me very well. In fact, my off hand likes how the stock narrows just ahead of the triggerguard.

There are no open sights. The rifle comes with a 4×32 scope and rings; so, you do have sights, but they have to be mounted. I’ll cover that process in Part 3.

The trigger isn’t adjustable. It’s two stages with a long, light first stage and a long second stage that has some creep. The safety is automatic and comes on every time the rifle is cocked. It’s a sliding switch located on the top right side of triggerguard, just forward of the trigger. It can be applied and taken off at any time and appears to block the trigger from moving.

Umarex Fusion rifle safety
The safety switch slides forward when the rifle is cocked. It can be applied manually at any time.

This rifle favors right-handed shooters. The stock is ambidextrous, but the bolt handle operates only on the right side of the receiver.

Charging the rifle
The Fusion needs two 12-gram CO2 cartridges each time it’s charged. They’re loaded end-to-end, similar to other CO2 rifles, but the charging mechanism isn’t as straightforward as you’re used to. There’s also a pressure-relief valve in the charging cap that lets you exhaust remaining pressure in the gun at the end of the useful charge. But that valve complicates the charging process just a bit.

To charge the gun, you first unscrew the cap that covers the pressure-relief valve control knob. Those threads are left-hand, so the cap comes off by screwing it clockwise. Then, the control knob is screwed down as far as it will go and then backed out three full turns. This closes the exhaust valve, making the CO2 reservoir cap ready for filling.

Use some kind of oil on the tip of each CO2 cartridge before dropping it into the rifle, and also spread some oil on the o-ring that seals the rifle’s cap. The instructions say to use RWS Chamber Lube; but since I had none of that, I used Crosman Pellgunoil.

Umarex Fusion rifle CO2 cap
The Fusion CO2 cap is more complex than the usual cap. The cap has been removed. The knob at the right is to exhaust the residual gas when it’s time to change the cartridges. It’s shown in the closed position, so the cap is gas-tight.

With both cartridges inside the tube, I screwed down the cap, and gas started hissing somewhere. I’m used to hearing a brief rush of gas, then the solid sound of the seal doing its job, so this hissing threw me for a loop. I played with the pressure-relief valve knob — unscrewing it farther. The hissing continued, so I screwed in the cap several more turns (against great resistance), and it finally stopped. That was the longest period of gas release I’ve ever heard from a CO2 gun during filling; so after shooting it several times, I exhausted the remaining gas and tried again with 2 fresh CO2 cartridges.

It happened the second time, too. Gas was exhausting for at least 30 seconds as I tried to tightly screw down the cap, but the cap got almost too tight to screw. This time, I knew the pressure-relief valve was closed; and I even opened and closed it during the procedure, just to make sure. I finally put my back into it and got the cap secured, but not before a lot of gas was lost.

I believe the problem is the o-ring on the cap is made of material that’s permeable to CO2 gas and swells rapidly in its presence. It swells enough when the gas is first released to make the cap difficult to screw in far enough to seal the chamber. We had problems like this with the old o-rings on CO2 guns years ago; but when the new non-porous o-ring material came to market, the problem stopped. This is something that needs to be looked at by the manufacturer. I will keep an eye on it as this test proceeds, and I’ll report my findings to you.

Power
The box says to expect 750 f.p.s. with alloy (meaning lead-free) pellets and 700 f.p.s. with lead. I’ll try it with both, and I’ll try several lead pellets because this will be of interest to potential buyers. If it really gets that much velocity, this rifle could be used to eliminate small pests up to the size of small rats at close range.

Sound
Since I’ve shot the rifle already, I’ve heard the discharge sound. But I’m going to wait until the velocity test to report it. You can ask, but I won’t tell. Gotta save something for the later reports!

Overall
We don’t get a new CO2 rifle that often, so this one seems to hold a lot of promise. Velocity testing and a report on the report are next.

Swiss Arms P92 replica pistol
Swiss Arms P92 CO2 BB pistol

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