Webley Senior straight grip air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Webley Senior straight grip
Webley Senior straight grip air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Design
  • Piston ring
  • Power
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Quirky

Today we start looking at a Webley Senior straight grip air pistol. This model was made from 1930 to 1935, according to the Blue Book of Airguns, 11th edition. There were two versions — a first version that has a trigger adjustment screw sticking out the front of the triggerguard and the second version, which is the one I have. I bought the pistol at a small gun show in Kentucky in the 1970s, when I was assigned to Fort Knox. I paid $75, which was considered a lot at the time, but I owned the first edition of the Airgun Digest and I knew what this pistol was. It’s worth a lot more today.

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Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Crosman-101-classic
  • Description
  • Peep sight
  • Cocking knobs
  • Materials
  • History
  • Maintenance
  • Crosman 101CG

I was trying to report on rebuilding the Daisy 853 today, but a last-minute change prevented that. One of our readers, Paperweight, sent me Daisy’s very detailed .pdf file on rebuilding the 753/853 that has far more detail than the one on Pilkington’s website. It includes some steps that Pilkington overlooks, and those steps are vital. He also told me that the brown o-ring goes on the action and the black one goes on the pump piston. I had followed someone else’s directions and had them reversed. So I had to backtrack and switch the o-rings, plus I used the more detailed Daisy instructions to assemble the gun. I’ll tell you more when I do that report.

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Crosman 150: Part 2

Crosman 150: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150
Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Leave the pipe wrench alone!
  • Different type of inlet valve
  • Velocity test
  • RWS Hobby
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Crosman Premier
  • More on the pistol
  • Test gun

Today we look at the velocity of my Crosman 150 pistol. When I started this test the gun had been holding gas for more than a year. I exhausted the CO2 cartridge that was in it and I need to say a word about that. The 150′s design is such that there is no easy way to exhaust the gas. I just shoot it out. The CO2 chamber is filled with pressurized gas that keeps the o-ring sealing the end cap tightly until the pressure drops. But we are lucky today, because when this gun was new that o-ring was made of a different material that absorbed gas and swelled up. It sometimes had to sit empty for a couple hours before you could get the cap off!

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Feinwerkbau Model 2 target pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB model 2 pistol
FWB model 2 target air pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Too slow!
  • My first Harley
  • Consistant?
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • RWS R10 pistol pellets
  • The test
  • Sight picture
  • H&N Finale Match Rifle
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol
  • Qiang Yuan Training
  • RWS R10 Pistol
  • Conclusions

This will be a special report that combines both velocity testing and accuracy testing of the FWB model 2 10-meter target pistol. After I published the last report and made the pistol look bad because its velocity wasn’t very stable, reader Carel told me I might have the power set too low. Carel is the man I bought the gun from, so I took his advice and dialed the velocity up. After two full turns on the power screw I got an average velocity of 534 f.p.s. with the Qiang Yuan Training pellets that had given me fits before. This time the maximum spread was just 10 f.p.s. with the same pellet that previously gave a 98 f.p.s. spread.

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Feinwerkbau Model 2 target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB model 2 pistol
FWB model 2 target air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Affordable target pistol
  • The importance of a grip
  • A huge price gap
  • FWB Model 2
  • How I got this gun
  • Back to the gun
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Dry-fire device
  • Grips
  • Accuracy
  • More to come

Affordable target pistol

Today we begin a report on an air pistol — the FWB Model 2. It’s a 10-meter pistol that was made back in the 1980s. I’ll tell you all about it, but first I want to tell you that this series is not really just about this one pistol. It’s really a response to reader, Mitch, who asked me about any 10-meter target pistol I knew of for under a thousand dollars. Like many shooters, Mitch wants to try his hand at 10-meter shooting. He plans to purchase a Gamo Compact now, but in case he finds that he likes 10-meter he wanted to know if there was a better target pistol that he could afford.

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H&N Excite Smart Shot copper-plated lead BBs: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Smart Shot BBs
H&N Excite Smart Shot BBs are the first lead BBs in 90 years.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Today’s test
  • Baseline testing
  • The test
  • Daisy BBs
  • Smart Shot BBs
  • BBs fell out
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Conclusions
  • What’s next?

Today’s test

Today’s test will be shooting the H&N Excite Smart Shot copper-plated lead BB in a Daisy Avanti Champion 499 — the world’s most accurate BB gun. There were concerns that this lead BB wouldn’t function in a 499 because of the gun’s magnetic BB seat in the breech. The fear was these BBs would just roll out the barrel if the barrel was depressed below level.

Baseline testing

I thought about shooting only 5 shots at each target because I knew the BBs were all going to go to the same place. In the end, though, convention won and I shot 10 shots per target. The distance was 5 meters and I rested the gun on a UTG monopod.

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Ruger Model 3 32-40 schuetzen rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Background
  • What is schuetzen shooting?
  • Ruger Number 3 schuetzen
  • Breech seater
  • Hand rest
  • Scope fixed
  • Range time
  • What this means

I’m writing this report for German blog reader Stephan and for all of the readers who don’t know what schuetzen rifles are. Today our superstars come from film, music or team sports. In 1900, they were all shooters — schuetzen shooters, to be precise. The sport of offhand target shooting took off worldwide when breechloading rifles came onto the scene around the 1870s, and offhand target shooting became the sport of kings. Names like Pope, Hudson, Neidner and Farrow were on every kid’s lips in those days, and prizes that totaled $25,000 were awarded at matches at a time when the average annual family income was under $500.

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