Beeman R8: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • RWS Hobby
  • Shot cycle
  • RWS Superdome
  • Trigger pull
  • JSB Exact RS
  • How does this rifle compare?
  • Cocking effort
  • Next

Well, to say there is a lot of interest in the Beeman R8 would be an understatement! Just as I got a huge interest at the Findlay airgun show where I bought it, this blog has also revealed many shooters who are interested in both the R8 and in the current HW50S that I will now have to test for you. [Update on that. my friend, Mac, did test an HW50S back in 2010.]

I was very excited to test this rifle because it’s one of the smoothest breakbarrels I have every shot. That list includes my Tyrolean R8 and the RWS Diana 45 I tuned for Johnny Hill. Let’s get right to the test.

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Beeman R8: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The beginning
  • What is a lube tune?
  • The rifle
  • Initial impressions
  • The plan
  • History
  • Summary

When talking about guns that become favorites, they say the airgun picks the shooter. Actually they say that about a lot of hobbies. This R8 certainly picked me — and then steamrolled me into submission!

The beginning

I was at the dinner/reception the evening before the 2017 Findlay airgun show last weekend when Tyler Patner and Kristen Coss from Pyramyd Air walked in. I went over to say hello and Tyler asked me a question about an old airgun they had brought to sell. Actually they brought about 50 old guns and a lot of vintage Beeman pellets that they received in the purchase of a dealership. I asked to see the list and noticed a Beeman R8. That is an airgun I have never directly tested, though my Tyrolean breakbarrel that’s one of my all-time favorites started out as an R8. That one was tuned, and I always wondered what a standard R8 would be like, so I cut a deal for this rifle, sight unseen.

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BSF S70 air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S70
BSF S70 rifle is the father of several famous Weirauch models.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Today’s the day
  • Oiled the piston seal
  • RWS Hobby
  • Crosman Premier 7.9-grain
  • What’s up?
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today’s the day

Today we find out how honest that Freimark is on my BSF S70 rifle. If you don’t know what Freimark is, read Part 1.

The Freimark is a German airgun mark that denotes a gun that does not exceed 7.5 joules power at the muzzle. That’s 5.53 foot-pounds. That would be a 7-grain RWS Hobby pellet moving 596 f.p.s. That will be our line in the sand.

From my experience with the BSF line, the S55/60/70/80 rifles (same powerplant in all of them) are above 7.5 joules all the time. That doesn’t mean there can’t be some that were made below that level, if German law allows. UK law states that if a model of an airgun can produce over 12 foot-pounds, then ievery one of them must be accompanied by a Firearms Certificate (FAC). They do not allow lower-powered versions of the same model gun to avoid that requirement. In other words, once a certain model needs an FAC, all of that same model need an FAC, regardless of what power they generate. But like I said, I don’t know how the German law reads.

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Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A valuable report!
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Oil
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • The oiling
  • Experience pays off
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Back to Hobbys
  • How is it doing?
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

Today’s the day I discover how healthy my new/old Diana model 5 (Winchester 353) air pistol is. This is best done with a chronograph, which is the Nth time I have told you that.

A valuable report!

Today’s test will be a valuable lesson in spring gun dynamics. Because of how I conducted it, this test shows things that are not often seen this clearly. Let’s begin.

RWS Hobby pellets

I wanted to know up front whether this pistol is in good condition or not. So I used the RWS Hobby pellet first. In my research for this report I found stated velocities for the Diana model 5 pistol between 375 f.p.s. and 450 f.p.s. Those numbers were no doubt obtained with a light pellet, and in the days that the model 5 was selling, lead pellets were the norm. I thought a lightweight lead pellet would have to give me the fastest average velocity. I was wrong, but let me tell you how the test went.

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El Gamo 68-XP .22 caliber: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

El Gamo XP-68
The El Gamo XP-68.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sighting in
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superdome
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Evaluation so far

Today I will shoot the .22-caliber El Gamo 68-XP for accuracy at 10 meters. I have full use of my right eye that I normally use for sighting, so everything was very clear in today’s test.

For some reason I only shot 5-shot groups instead of 10-shot groups today. The rifle is easy to load and shoot, so I don’t understand why I did this, but I did. For the first group, though, I actually shot 6 shots. I will explain.

Sighting in

I shot off a sandbag rest, using the artillery hold. The first shot hit a couple inches below the target paper, so I cranked in a lot of elevation in the rear sight thumbwheel. That brought shot number 2 up to just under the bull at 6 o’clock. I was using a 6 o’clock hold, so the rifle was now hitting exactly where the sights were placed at 10 meters.

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Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • First test
  • Loading the clip
  • Air management
  • String two
  • Is this okay?
  • String three
  • Refilling the rifle after 36 shots
  • What’s the verdict?
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Lead-free lightweight pellets
  • Discharge sound
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we go right into shooting the Benjamin Wildfire for velocity. I’m excited, so let’s begin.

First test

I know there are many things people want to know about the Wildfire, so I am going to test it a little differently. You will still get the same results I always give, but I will add a few extra things I don’t usually do. The incredible interest in this gun justifies this special approach. We will begin with Crosman Premier lite pellets.

I filled the rifle to 2000 psi and began shooting. Since the clip holds 12 pellets I tested it with strings of 12 shots instead of 10. I will give you the standard data in a moment, but I first want to show you the velocity of each shot.

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Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

This report covers:

  • Let’s get it straight
  • Different desires
  • PCPs
  • Actually
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • How difficult is it to fill with a hand pump?
  • A good way to enter the world of PCP
  • Yes, but a hand pump costs more than the rifle!!!
  • Today was not planned

Let’s get it straight

This is the season of the tax refund, here in the U.S. tax refunds come in all shapes and sizes. If you work for an employer, your options of controlling the size of your refund are few — just whatever choices the payroll service allows. Usually they can adjust it so the refund is as low as possible, but always a positive number, so you owe no additional money when your taxes are computed. Or if you prefer, more can be deducted each pay period so the refund is larger.

For those who are self-employed, the options are greater. You either pay your estimated taxes quarterly, or you wait until the end of the year and have a very large bill due. Or you hire a payroll service and they help you sculpt your withholding to whatever suits you.

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