Posts Tagged ‘UTG Bug Buster 3-9×32 AO rifle scope’

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle
Crosman MTR77NP air rifle

Today, I’m testing the Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle for accuracy at 25 yards. This is going to be a very different accuracy report, for I have no targets to show you. Well, there is one target, but it wasn’t shot with the test rifle.

What gives?
In the last report, I mentioned that I wanted to mount a different scope on the test rifle and test it at 25 yards. I thought the Bug Buster 3-9x scope would be a good one, and I also shimmed under the rear ring because the rifle was shooting low in the 10-meter test.

I thought the rifle would group about 3 times larger at 25 yards than it had at 10 meters, but I also hoped some pellets might remain tighter than that. What happened, however, was just the reverse. Instead of 3-inch groups I got 5- to 6-inch “patterns.” I won’t call them groups because not all pellets fired even hit the target trap. And when that happens, I stop shooting that particular pellet immediately.

Crosman Premier lites
First up was the pellet I thought had the best chance to do well — the 7.9-grain Crosman Premier. They had done well at 10 meters with just 2 pellets outside the main group. Had they held to my 3X size increase, they would have grouped into about 2.2 inches; but when the third shot landed 6 inches away from shots 1 and 2, and then shot 4 landed 5 inches from that pellet, I stopped shooting.

I checked the scope mount to see that it was still tight. It was, and I’m pretty sure this scope is a good one because it has done well in other tests on other airguns. So, Premier lites are out.

H&N Baracuda Match
Next, I tried some H&N Baracuda Match pellets. But they were no better. They hit the target lower than the Premiers, and 3 shots landed in about a 5-inch pattern. Then, one pellet missed the target trap altogether. I stopped shooting after that shot, but I wasn’t done with this pellet.

I got the Air Venturi Pellet Pen and Seater and deep-seated a couple Premier lites to see what affect that would have. The point of impact changed, but the accuracy didn’t improve. And when the third shot missed the trap, I stopped shooting Baracudas.

RWS Hobby
The next pellet I tried was the RWS Hobby, which gave such a nice, round group at 10 meters. Two shots landed together, and I thought we were on the right road; then the next shot hit about 6 inches away from them. The 4th shot missed the trap altogether, and I stopped shooting that pellet.

RWS Superdome
By now, I was in a quandary. Was it me or the gun or the scope? I went back to 12 feet from the target and confirmed that the scope was still shooting to the same point, then I went back to 25 yards and tried an RWS Superdome. I had confirmed at 12 feet that the Superdome would be on paper at 25 yards and the first shot was. It landed high, but in good enough position to keep shooting. The next shot missed the paper altogether and I don’t know where it went. That was it for Superdomes.

What to do?
By this point I was really shaken. My confidence was ebbing fast and I needed to end this session on a high note. So I grabbed my Beeman R8 Tyrolean and a tin of Air Arms Falcon pellets and shot a final group of 10 at 25 yards. This one turned out good, as I expected it would. That’s where today’s target comes from. It isn’t the best group I’ve shot with the R8, but it’s a darn sight better than I did with the MTR77NP. Ten shots went into 0.41 inches.

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle Beeman R8 group Falcon pellets 25 yards
I shot this 10-shot group of Air Arms Falcons with my Beeman R8 Tyrolean, just to confirm that I still knew how to shoot. It measures 0.41 inches between the 2 centers farthest apart.

What’s next?
I need some time to think about why this rifle might be performing like it is. If one of you made a report like this to me, I would tell you to check the scope because that sure seems like what it is. But I did check the scope and found no problems. The one thing left to do is to crank the elevation down all the way and all the way to the left and shoot a group. If it tightens up, then it was the scope. If not, it’s either the mounts or the rifle.

A little tip
What I did with the R8 today is a handy tip to remember. Sometimes the problem is you — or you wonder if it might be. Shooting a good group with a rifle of known accuracy is the best way to rule that out.

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle
Crosman MTR77NP air rifle

Today, we’ll look at the first of 2 accuracy tests planned for the Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle. As you know, this rifle has no open sights; so, the first thing I did was mount the Centerpoint 4X32 scope that’s included with the gun. That went quick because the scope caps have 2 screws each, but there was no slippage of the scope in the rings during this test.

The scope is very bright as you would expect a 4X scope to be, but at the 10-meter distance I shot in this test, it was fuzzy. The parallax is fixed for a further distance that isn’t indicated on the scope. I can tell from examination that it’s set farther than 25 yards.

I’m testing at 10 meters today and will take the best pellets into the next test, which will be at 25 yards. The first pellet up was the 7.9-grain Crosman Premier. You will remember from the velocity test that the test rifle shoots considerably slower than its advertised velocity of 1,000 f.p.s. with lead pellets. It went an average of 866 f.p.s. with 7-grain RWS Hobbys.

I discovered that the rifle is shooting low, even with the scope adjusted up high. For the next test, I’ll shim the rear scope ring. That should raise the pellet up far enough.

Crosman Premier lites
At 10 meters, 10 Premier lite pellets made a group that measures 0.721 inches between centers. The group has a main group of 8 pellets within it and 2 flyers, though there were no shots that were pulled. This is a case where a better scope might do better on target because the image was so fuzzy that I might have been off the aim point by 1/8 inch at times.

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle Premier lite group
Ten Premier lites went into 0.721 inches at 10 meters. The 2 flyers were not called.

Firing behavior
The MTR77NP fires with a solid thump. There’s no vibration, and the shot cycle is very quick. The recoil through the butt isn’t sharp the way it is on many gas-spring air rifles. And the A2 stock seems to be ideal for handling the recoil of this rifle without stinging your cheek.

Trigger-pull
Now that I’ve shot the gun for accuracy, I can tell you the trigger-pull is very long in stage 2. The pull length of stage 2 is supposed to be adjustable, but I turned in the screw about 7 full turns and nothing changed. It feels like a placebo screw; or if it does adjust anything, the effect is very small.

H&N Baracuda Match
The next pellet I tested was the heavy H&N Baracuda Match. This pellet showed some promise in the velocity test, and I thought it might do well in this rifle. Ten of them went into a group that measured 0.982 inches between centers. Like the Premier lite, there were flyers outside the main group, though I did not see them when shooting. I’m beginning to think that the next test needs to be conducted with a different scope.

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle H&N Baracuda Match group
Ten Baracuda Match went into 0.982 inches at 10 meters. Two flyers in this group, as well.

The scope mounts had loosened by this point in the test. The rings remained tight, but the screws that attach the rings to the base on the rifle loosened up. I tightened them and also checked them after every 5 shots from this point on.

RWS Hobby
Next, I tried 10 RWS Hobby pellets. They went much lower and also to the left. They actually missed the target paper. The group was round and measured 0.826 inches between centers.

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle RWS Hobby group
Ten RWS Hobby pellets went into 0.826 inches at 10 meters. This group is quite round, which is a good thing. It dropped below the target paper.

Crosman SSP Hollowpoint
I did check the Crosman SSP hollowpoint that was the lead-free pellet I tested in the velocity test, but after 2 pellets missed the target backer altogether, I stopped shooting. Not the pellet for this rifle.

JSB Exact Express
The last pellet I tested was the 7.87-grain JSB Exact Express dome. I haven’t had much luck with this pellet in the past, but I keep trying it just in case. Alas, the MTR77NP doesn’t like it, either. Ten pellets went into a vertical 1.661 inches at 10 meters. Another pellet to not use in this rifle.

Crosman MTR77NP scoped air rifle JSB Exact Express group
Ten JSB Exact Express pellets went into 1.661 inches at 10 meters. Obviously, not a pellet for the MTR77NP.

Evaluation so far
I like the way the rifle feels when it fires. It has good power and a solid thump when it fires. The trigger-pull is long but not too creepy.

The scope leaves a lot to be desired. I think I’ll replace it with a Bug Buster 3-9X scope for the next test, and I’ll shim the rear scope ring before mounting it on the rifle. That should give the rifle the best chance to do well at 25 yards.

Obviously, the pellets to try are the Crosman Premier lite, the H&N Baracuda and the RWS Hobby. The Hobbys will be at their maximum recommended distance, but they may surprise us.

If you like black rifles and have been considering the MTR77NP, I think it’s worth a look. We’ll know better after the next test.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 AO rifle scope: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 right
The 3-9x Bug Buster packs a lot of performance into a small package.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 left
Bug Buster left side.

Today, I’ll tell you how the latest 3-9X32 UTG Bug Buster scope works in action. As you know, this scope was mounted on the Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup rifle that I tested for you yesterday. While shooting it, I had the opportunity to examine the performance of this latest Bug Buster scope in great detail, so now I can report on that, as well.

A world of improvement
The last Bug Buster scope I used before this one was a fixed 6x scope that’s now many years old. This new Bug Buster is very advanced from that one, though there are some things that haven’t changed.

Variable power
The first and most obvious improvement is variable power. Of course, Bug Busters have had variable power for many years, but I think this was my first chance to really use one. In the old days, we were just thrilled to have a fixed 4x. It was the ability to focus down to just 9 feet that was the big sales feature of the Bug Buster, and we didn’t expect much more than that. But variable power is usually better, since it gives you the opportunity to choose where to set the magnification. That being said, I cranked this scope to 9x and left it there. I doubt there are many reasons for me to ever use the lower power settings.

Field of view
The Bug Buster has a field of view slightly larger than a scope of normal length with the same specifications. But in my experience, the exit pupil is more critical on the Bug Buster. In other words, your eye has to be in exactly the right spot or you can’t see the image. That was how the scope acted in the test of the 3D bullpup, but I don’t know if it was the odd hold I had to use with that rifle or not.

Crosshairs
The whole reason I’m testing this scope is because of the new, finer crosshairs. I guess the small groups I got in the test attest to the fact that these lines are thinner and thus better able to parse the bull closer. I don’t know of a more dramatic way of demonstrating it to you unless you look through the scope yourself.

And, of course, the thin inner crosshair lines have mil-dots running in both directions. So, you can estimate range if you read and apply the data in the handbook that comes with the scope.

Illumination
I was concerned that because I’m colorblind, the illuminated crosshairs would be of limited use to me, but that isn’t the case. While many of the colors do look alike at the lower power levels, I can see differences in all the colors at the maximum intensity. The 2-button system takes some learning, but turning on and off are both simple commands, so there’s no danger of running down the battery. And there’s a timed shutoff, on top of everything. I don’t think I would use the illumination most of the time, but it’s there if you need it, and the battery will keep a long time if not in use.

On the highest power illumination, the inside of the scope tube gets illuminated some, as well as the reticle lines. Of course, the proper way to use this feature in the field is to run the lowest illumination that you can see, so this really isn’t a problem.

Eyepiece adjustment
My shooting buddy, Otho, has eyes that cannot see through most scopes clearly even with corrective lenses. But all the Leapers models have a very extended eyepiece adjustment that suits him fine. When I sight through his scopes, I have to make gross adjustments to keep from seeing double reticle lines. Only the Leapers scopes have enough adjustment so that both of us can use the same scope.

Lockable reticle adjustments and adjustable zero
Back in the bad old days, we would adjust our reticles until they were perfect and then never let anyone near our guns. I’ve had people grab one of my airguns off my tables at a show and start twisting both adjustment knobs with abandon. When I asked them what they were trying to do, they said they didn’t know — they just wanted to see how the knobs felt!

Well, the Bug Buster’s knobs are locked in place with collars that screw down tight after adjustments have been completed. That gives me time to snatch my rifle back from someone before they can screw up my scope setting.

The scales on both adjustment knobs can be loosened and repositioned so your sight-in is shown as the zero point on each scale. Then, if you have to adjust the knob in the future, you always know where to return.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 retical locking collars
Below the scale of each adjustment knob is a thin collar that can be turned down to lock that knob from turning. This protects your scope adjustment. You can also loosen the small Allen screw on top of each cap and slip the scales to keep the settings as your zero point.

Flip-up scope caps not useful
The Bug Buster comes with flip-up scope caps that I find less than useful — especially on the objective lens. Since the AO requires the objective lens to twist, the flip-up cap is never in the right position and will just get in the way. I take both scope caps off when using this scope because I can’t be bothered with them. If the AO were a sidewheel, then flip-ups would make a lot more sense to me.

Position-sensitive
The Bug Buster is a compact scope. As such, the scope tube sections where the scope rings attach are very short. So the rings have to move to where the scope needs them to be, because there isn’t a lot of extra scope tube on either side of each ring. A one-piece mount is all but impossible to use, as the location of the rings would only line up with the scope tube by coincidence.

Many airguns do not permit a scope to be mounted far enough to the rear for the eye-relief to work with a short scope like this. You have to consider that when mounting a Bug Buster or any compact scope. If the gun has a scope stop plate or vertical stop hole located far forward, it probably will not work with a Bug Buster. But if the top of the gun is wide open, like on the Rainstorm 3D bullpup, then it’s what you want.

Overall evaluation
The new 3-9X32 AO Bug Buster is the best one of the entire line. It offers more flexibility, yet comes in the same compact package as all the other Bug Busters. It meets a specific need in the scope world, yet still provides enough flexibility to work on many airguns.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Evanix Rainstorm 3D Bullpup
Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup PCP air rifle. Since this is such a powerful and loud air rifle, I decided not to shoot it in my house. So, today is a 25-yard accuracy test that was conducted at my rifle range. I doesn’t matter, though, because 25 yards is the same indoors or out.

You may recall that I adjusted the trigger last time. I said I got it as light as it would safely go because the adjustment acts on the sear contact area, so this day on the range was the first real chance I had to test it under real shooting circumstances. Although it’s a little heavy at 6 lbs., 10 oz., it’s now reasonably crisp. There is no significant creep in the trigger, which for a bullpup is pretty amazing. It’s about the same as some military rifle triggers. I can shoot this rifle with no excuses.

Someone thought that the rifle would be easy to cock because the sidelever is on the right side of the receiver. Well, touch your right shoulder with your right index finger to get an idea of how easy it is. I found it best to dismount the rifle from my shoulder to cock it each time.

Another assumption I made while in my office was that the Bug Buster scope that comes with medium-high rings would work well on this rifle. Size-wise it does look good; but when I went to shoot off the bench, I discovered that the high rings will be best, after all. That’s no reflection on the Bug Buster scope — the rings just need to be higher. As it is now, I have to tilt my head severely to see the image.

JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys
While I usually begin any shooting session at 10 feet to check the scope’s alignment, this time I settled down at 25 yards and just started shooting. The pellets for the first group landed 3 inches low and 1.5 inches to the left, which is not bad for just mounting the scope and shooting without sighting in. The first group was 10 JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy pellets — an 18.1-grain dome that often works well in airguns in this 40 foot-pound power range.

The first group measures 0.574 inches for 10 shot at 25 yards. I thought that was an auspicious start for this rifle.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards JSB Exact Jumbo 18-grain group
Ten shots into 0.574 inches at 25 yards is a good start.

The rifle doesn’t move when it fires. I think that’s due to the weight, though I had a good hold on it, since I was in a somewhat odd position and had a tight grasp, just to see through the scope.

JSB Exact Jumbo Monsters
After the first group, I adjusted the scope by guesswork and brought the next group up to just under the bull I was aiming at. This was with a clip of the 25.4-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster pellets. This is another dome that’s even heavier than the tried-and-true Beeman Kodiaks. They acted like they wanted to group, but a couple strayed outside the main concentration, making me think they’re not the best for this rifle. Too bad; because at that weight, they really pack the punch.

Two pellets got stuck in the clip and had to be unloaded and reloaded to work right. That would be reason enough not to pick this pellet.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards JSB Exact Monster 25-grain group
Ten JSB Jumbo Monster pellets went into 0.942 inches at 25 yards. Two pellets got stuck in the clip, so this pellet is not recommended for the 3D bullpup.

Eun Jin
Next, I tried 10 of the 28.4-grain Eun Jin domes. They just barely fit in the clip lengthwise and 2 got stuck in the magazine; but if they were accurate enough, I could overlook any shortcomings just to get the extra power. Ten landed in a group that measures 0.666 inches. That’s pretty darned good when the extra power is needed.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards Eun Jin group
Ten Eun Jin pellets went into 0.666 inches at 25 yards. Two pellets got stuck in the clip, so this pellet is only recommended for this rifle when you need the extra power.

Beeman Kodiak
It was time to try the Beeman Kodiaks that I thought might be one of the best pellets in this rifle. And I was right! Ten of them went into a group measuring 0.491 inches — the smallest group of the test! Don’t be misled by the appearance of this group. It does appear larger than the first group, but careful measuring shows that it’s smaller.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards Beeman Kodiak group
Ten Beeman Kodiaks went into 0.491 inches at 25 yards. No pellets were stuck in the clip, so this is the pellet of choice for the Evanix 3D bullpup.

RWS Superdome
The last pellet I tried was the 14.5-grain RWS Superdome. It’s a very popular pellet — especially among spring-gun shooters, so I thought I’d include it in this test. Boy, what a dramatic finish it was! Ten Superdomes went into a group that measures 2.914 inches between centers! If I hadn’t shot it myself I wouldn’t have believed it after seeing all those other groups! Obviously, I’m not going to recommend Superdomes for the Rainstorm 3D bullpup!

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards RWS Superdome group
Ten RWS Superdomes went into 2.914 inches at 25 yards. This is a non-starter for this rifle.

Cool carrying case
A while back, AirForce Airguns presented me with a TalonP pistol that I tested for you. They were kind enough to put it in one of their soft carry bags, and I found that it fits this bullpup perfectly! After posting this, Edith told me that the bag is no longer being made. If you are buying the 3D, you might want to try one of the tactical bags made by Leapers. They’re about the same size and are already linked to the gun on Pyramyd Air’s site.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup AirForce case closed
The AirForce tactical bag is perfect for the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup AirForce case open
Besides the rifle, there are many zippered pockets for the rest of your shooting stuff.

General impression thus far
I learned in this session that, while the Bug Buster is a wonderful scope, the medium-high rings it comes with are too low for this bullpup. Since I’ll be changing the rings anyway, I’ll use this opportunity to mount a different scope on the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

I also learned that JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys (the 18.1-grain dome) and Beeman Kodiaks are the 2 best pellets in the test rifle. Next time, I’ll shoot these 2, plus perhaps one additional pellet I haven’t tried yet. That will be the final test at 50 yards.

The bullpup configuration was never meant to be shot from a bench. It would feel and handle much better in the offhand position, I’m sure. But the test was to prove how well the rifle shoots, which is why I shot it rested.

The long pull length is no hinderance whatsoever. I found that it supports the bullpup configuration and helps you control a rifle that’s otherwise too short.

If this is a rifle that fascinates you, I would have to say it’s probably a good one to get. I’ll still shoot it at 50 yards, but I believe today’s test shows all that you wanted to see.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 AO rifle scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 right
The 3-9x Bug Buster packs a lot of performance into a small package.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 left
Bug Buster left side.

Today, we’ll start looking at Leapers’ new 3-9X32 UTG Bug Buster rifle scope. As you know from yesterday’s blog, I’ve mounted this scope on the Evanix Rainstorm 3D Bullpup for testing. I feel the small scope compliments the compact size of the bullpup.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 on Rainstorm
The Bug Buster looks good on the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

Boy, has Leapers come a long way with the Bug Buster since it first came out! First of all, let’s get the introductions out of the way. Leapers is the manufacturer. UTG, short for Under The Gun, is one of their product lines. Bug Buster is a name that airgunners gave to this scope when it first came out. Because it held (and still holds) the world record for close parallax adjustment, which in practical terms is the same as focusing, the compact scope was touted for shooting insects as soon as it hit the market. Someone coined the name Bug Buster, and Leapers adopted it as their own.

That first Bug Buster was a fixed 4x scope. Today, I’m testing a 3-9x variable. What a difference that makes. Not only can you focus as close as 9 feet, you can also magnify your target 9 times at that distance! If you’re sighted-in, you can pick which part of the bug to eliminate.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 3 yards
This is something no other scope in the world offers — parallax correction down to 3 yards!

But there’s a whole lot more than just close focusing. This Bug Buster comes with lockable turrets, which are the adjustment knobs for windage and elevation. To lock or unlock them, a ring at the bottom is loosened or tightened. Do it once and it will seem intuitive.

The zero can also be reset; so once the scope is zeroed for a certain range, the scale can be repositioned so it reads zero. This allows you to adjust the scope from this zero and see how far you’ve gone — as long as you don’t go farther than one full rotation of the adjustment knob. It’s very handy for hunters who wish to change their scope zero in the field.

The reticle
The big reason I’m testing this scope is the reticle. Early Bug Busters had one shortcoming — a thick reticle. Precision aiming was difficult , if not impossible, because the crosshairs covered so many inches at 100 yards. That’s what’s changed in the new Bug Buster. The reticle is a mil-dot. The reticle lines are now about medium-sized. They won’t cover too much of your target, and yet you can still find them while hunting in a dark forest that has lots of shadows.

There are dots on the inner lines in both directions. The centers of the dots are one mil apart, which provides a refernce for measuring angles through the scope. And angles can be turned into distances if you know the approximate size of what you’re measuring.

In the Army, we had to learn the approximate size of common battlefield equipment such as tanks and personnel carriers so we could calculate the distance to them with binoculars that had a mil-scale reticle. Hunters need to learn the same sorts of things, but for the animals they’re likely to spot. That information, coupled with the tutorial in the scope’s owner’s manual, will help you calculate distances to your target.

The reticle is illuminated with Leapers’ patented EZ-TAP lighting system. Two buttons atop the scope control the intensity and selection of the colors. Now, I’m colorblind, as are up to 14 percent of all males. My malady is a red-green defiency, which is the most common type. That doesn’t mean I can’t see those colors — I just don’t see them the way a person with normal sight sees them. So, the question is: How valuable is it to me that there are 6 different colors for the reticle and 6 levels of intensity for each color? Well, as a matter of fact, I can differentiate each of the 6 colors when they’re at their most intense. But when the intensity level drops, most of the colors become gray to my eyes. I can see them, but they don’t seem to have much color. The red and the green colors stand apart as the most vivid of all.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 EZ Tap
Those two buttons control the colors and intensity of the illuminated reticle. There are 36 choices available.

I will say that you need to read the manual to fully understand how to operate this scope. Not only does it address the EZ-TAP operation, it also goes into great detail on how to estimate range with the mil-dots.

But wait — there’s more!
As if all those features weren’t enough, this scope comes bundled with UTG Max-Strength, quick-detach, medium-height rings. These sell separately for $25, and my friend Mac reviewed them for us in 2011. Mac reviewed 30mm rings and these are one inch, but in all other aspects they’re identical.

UTG Max Strength Quick Lock Rings
A set of UTG Max-Strength, medium-height, quick-detach rings comes with the Bug Buster.

Packaging
If you’re a store owner, the UTG scope line now comes in glass-clear packaging that allows the customer to see the scope inside. I call it the Snow White box. This packaging is sealed at the factory, so a customer will know if it’s been opened before he receives the scope…because there’s clear film tape that must be removed to get inside the box. That should end the claims of selling used merchandise, which is pretty common in the scope world.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 package
The new UTG packaging is transparent, so everyone can see what’s inside. Clear protective film/tape keeps them out until the scope is sold. Obviously, this doesn’t show the scope from today’s blog, but it demonstrates my point just the same.

Dimensions
The Bug Buster is a compact scope. It’s just 8.5 inches long and weighs only 13.9 ounces. The tube is one inch in diameter. It’ll look petite on most normal air rifles and just right on the small ones. The only consideration the size brings is the scope tube sections are very short on either side of the turret, so the rings don’t have much room to move. If your rifle has a built-in scope stop, this scope may not come back far enough for the proper eye relief. On guns like the 3D bullpup and big bores with short receivers though, the Bug Buster might be the best scope out there.

Testing
The only way to test this scope is by firing the gun and adjusting the reticle. So that testing will have to wait. I can tell you now that the optics are clear and sharp, and the eyepiece has buckets of corrective adjustment in it. The rest will await the testing of the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

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