Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A valuable report!
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Oil
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • The oiling
  • Experience pays off
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Back to Hobbys
  • How is it doing?
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

Today’s the day I discover how healthy my new/old Diana model 5 (Winchester 353) air pistol is. This is best done with a chronograph, which is the Nth time I have told you that.

A valuable report!

Today’s test will be a valuable lesson in spring gun dynamics. Because of how I conducted it, this test shows things that are not often seen this clearly. Let’s begin.

RWS Hobby pellets

I wanted to know up front whether this pistol is in good condition or not. So I used the RWS Hobby pellet first. In my research for this report I found stated velocities for the Diana model 5 pistol between 375 f.p.s. and 450 f.p.s. Those numbers were no doubt obtained with a light pellet, and in the days that the model 5 was selling, lead pellets were the norm. I thought a lightweight lead pellet would have to give me the fastest average velocity. I was wrong, but let me tell you how the test went.

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Daisy’s 179 BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy 179
Daisy 179 was the first Spittin’ Image BB gun Daisy made.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Metal frame
  • Love-hate
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • It is a catapult!
  • Cocking effort
  • Velocity
  • Quiet!
  • Do-over
  • Reliable feeding
  • Accuracy
  • A real lesson!

Metal frame

We are back looking at my Daisy 179 again, and the first important thing to know is I got it wrong when I originally described the frame or body of the gun as being molded in plastic. It definitely is metal. It would have to be, to be held together by screws the way that it is. Sorry for the confusion!

Love-hate

We heard from some owners who love the gun and from others who hate it. I guess this is an airgun that you need to understand before getting one. It’s not what it looks like — which is a single action revolver. It’s single action all right, but very far from being a revolver. It is a 12-shot repeater, but the spring that operates the hammer is so strong that it is impossible to thumb rapidly with one hand, or to fan. It’s a very deliberate gun.

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Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • First test
  • Loading the clip
  • Air management
  • String two
  • Is this okay?
  • String three
  • Refilling the rifle after 36 shots
  • What’s the verdict?
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Lead-free lightweight pellets
  • Discharge sound
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we go right into shooting the Benjamin Wildfire for velocity. I’m excited, so let’s begin.

First test

I know there are many things people want to know about the Wildfire, so I am going to test it a little differently. You will still get the same results I always give, but I will add a few extra things I don’t usually do. The incredible interest in this gun justifies this special approach. We will begin with Crosman Premier lite pellets.

I filled the rifle to 2000 psi and began shooting. Since the clip holds 12 pellets I tested it with strings of 12 shots instead of 10. I will give you the standard data in a moment, but I first want to show you the velocity of each shot.

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Diana 240 Classic:Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.


Part 1

This report covers:

  • BB’s eye
  • You liked it
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Hobby
  • Crosman Premier lite
  • The trigger
  • Trigger
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

BB’s eye

Just an update on my eye that had the cataract removed. It is now more acute at distance than the other eye. I see the doctor who did the surgery this Friday and am expecting that she will pronounce it fixed. I can now aim with open sights once more. Now, on to today’s report.

You liked it

Just an observation from the comments to Part 1 of this report. Many of you like this Diana 240 Classic air rifle for the same reasons I do. You like the small size, easy cocking and the general classic styling. Today we begin discovering how it performs, and I have to admit that I have high hopes. There aren’t enough airguns like this one in the market anymore, and I think that’s a shame. Because this is where the heart of airgunning lies — not in .22 rimfire power and accuracy, but with guns that are fun and easy to shoot.

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Dan Wesson M512 4-inch pellet revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New 4-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver from ASG is very realistic!

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2
  • Loading the cartridges
  • The tests
  • RWS Basic
  • Crosman Premier lite
  • Qiang Yuan training pellets
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Analysis
  • 2017 Pyramyd Air Cup
  • 2017 Texas Airgun Show

Today I test the velocity of the Dan Wesson 4-inch pellet revolver. This should be an interesting test.

Loading the CO2

I installed a fresh CO2 cartridge in the grip, after putting a couple drops of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of the cartridge before piercing. The oil gets blown into the valve and coats every seal inside, ensuring the gun remains gas-tight.

Loading the cartridges

The cartridges load from the rear, which is easy to do. The pellets slip into the plastic liners of each cartridge easily and stay there securely until the gas blows they into the barrel.
The loaded cartridges also load easily into the cylinder. When you’re done shooting, all you have to do is open the cylinder and tip the muzzle up and the cartridges fall right out. There is no expansion from gas the way there is with a firearm cartridge.

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BB’s Christmas gift: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
Like all Supergrades, my new rifle is graceful and attractive.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Wise council
  • A special technique for old multi-pumps
  • Is it holding?
  • Test one
  • How is the pump lever?
  • Test 2 — stability
  • Conclusion

Today I’m recovering from the cataract surgery, but I wrote this on Wednesday, so I was still functional. What I thought I would do is try a little experiment that could work. If it does, I will have found a new technique for restoring an old Sheridan Supergrade. Read Part 2 to learn why this multi-pump is so different from all the others.

Wise council

Before I begin, following Part 2 of this report I heard from airgunsmith Tony McDaniel of TMac’s Airgun Service in North Carolina. Tony is the guy who hosts the North Carolina Airgun Show each year (it’s on Oct. 20 & 21, 2017), and the registration form plus show info is on his website.

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Why own a chronograph?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • No preaching
  • Evaluate an old airgun
  • Test pellets
  • Evaluate a tuneup
  • For detailed tuning and product development
  • What it isn’t

Today is my cataract surgery. I don’t know how well I will be able to function online for the next several days, so will you veteran readers please help the new guys? I know you always do, but I’m just telling you what’s happening.

If you have read this blog for very long you can answer the title question for yourself, because I write about chronographs all the time. I use them for big things like testing the health of a new acquisition (the Sharp Ace Target and the Sheridan Supergrade), and things more subtle (testing the Air Arms Galahad).

No preaching

I used to preach about when to use a chrono and when not to, but I’m not going to do that today. Use it whenever you like and for whatever reason suits you.

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