AirForce Texan big bore rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Texan big bore
The Texan from AirForce Airguns is a .458 big bore to be reckoned with. The 4×32 scope and bipod are optional accessories.

Note: I just found out the scope is not included with the Texan. I’ve added a note to part 1, where I originally mentioned it was included.

This report covers:

• Power
• Air pressure
• The bullet weight tuner
• The bullets
• Using the bullet tuner
• Maximum power

Before I begin, I’m asking the organizers of airgun shows around the country to please send me their show information. Several readers have asked me for this information, and we need to publish it in a place everyone can find. The North Central Texas airgun show will be held at the Parker County Sportsman Club in Poolville, on Saturday, August 29. Send your airgun show info to blogger@pyramydair.com.

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Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo.

This report covers:

• Velocity baselining with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Premier lite average for 5 pumps
• Premier lite average for 10 pumps
• Velocity baselining with Daisy BBs
• Daisy BB average for 5 pumps
• Daisy BB average for 10 pumps
• H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads
• Gamo round lead ball
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo. I told you last time that the loading trough is narrow and difficult to access, and I tried to photograph it for you but was unable to get a picture that showed what I’m talking about. Just take my word that this rifle has much less access room than a Daisy 880 or a Crosman 2100.

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

This report covers:

• The gun has a rear sight
• Kitchen-sink velocity test
• Daisy Premium Grade BBs
• Loading and unloading
• Umarex Precision Steel BBs
• Crosman Copperhead BBs
• Avanti Precision Ground Shot
• Lead balls
• Shot count

Well, it’s official. The Colt Single Action Army BB revolver I’m testing for you is a production model. The photos Pyramyd Air originally posted on their site were photos that Umarex sent them of a pre-production gun. All the blued guns will look like the one I’m testing. If you were concerned how your blued gun would look, it should look just like mine. By the time you read this blog, the images on Pyramyd Air’s site will have been updated.

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Webley Mark VI BB revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark VI revolver
Webley Mark VI BB revolver.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

• Accuracy test design
• Let’s begin
• What’s the verdict?

Let’s look at the accuracy of the new Webley Mark VI BB revolver. I tested it for velocity with 5 premium BBs. Now that I’ve seen how much interest there is in this revolver, I’m going to test it with all 5 of those BBs. Since the cylinder holds 6 shots, I’m shooting 6-shot groups in this test.

Accuracy test design
I will be shooting from a rested 5-meter position. For the rest, I’ll use the new UTG Monopod that I’ve been testing since October. Tomorrow, I will begin the review of that piece of equipment that I believe is as good as the best bipods.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Diana 45 left
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

• Velocity with Premier lite pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• RWS Hobby pellets
• Cocking effort
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Diana 45 I’m testing. I think you’re in for a surprise. I know I was startled when I saw the numbers. I’d forgotten so much!

The 45 was a magnum air rifle for its day, but in that day 800 f.p.s. was considered the fastest velocity that airguns could achieve, and only a few of them, like the Diana 45, could do it. Air Rifle Headquarters catalogs of the late 1970s show Diana 45s getting up to 860 f.p.s. after their qccurization (their name for a tuneup), but stock guns were only able to get just above 800.

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Don Robinson BSA Airsporter: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Don Robinson Airsporter right
UK maker Don Robinson made this beautiful BSA Airsporter — a testimony to his work on airguns!

This report covers:

• Velocity — Premier lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• H&N Baracuda Match pellets
• Cocking effort
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

Today, I’ll test the .177-caliber Don Robinson BSA Airsporter velocity. As you recall from part 1, this rifle was given a Master Tune by airgunsmith Dave Slade. I’ve selected 3 pellets to test today that I think will show us the power and consistency of this rifle very well. Let’s get to it.

Velocity — Premier lite pellets
The first pellet I tested was the Crosman Premier 7.9-grain dome — the Premier lite. This pellet averaged 594 f.p.s. in the Airsporter, with a low of 585 and a high of 605 f.p.s. That’s 20 f.p.s. spread. At the average velocity, this pellet produces 6.19 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

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Webley Mark VI BB revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark VI revolver
Webley Mark VI BB revolver.

Part 1

This report covers:

• Longevity
• The gun
• Velocity
• Double-action
• Back to single-action
• How many good shots on a cartridge?
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

We received a lot of comments on Part 1 of this report. Apparently, the Webley Mark VI BB revolver resonates strongly with a large number of readers. Most are very positive, but a few of you really dislike this BB pistol. Their biggest complaint is that it costs too much for a BB pistol.

I say, if you feel that way, just don’t buy it. The airsoft companies who are making these realistic replicas are coming from their world of 6mm plastic balls, and 4.3mm steel BBs are a lot easier to make than rifled BB guns. Some people think the only difference is a rifled barrel, but they overlook the hundreds of thousands of dollars that must be invested plus the time learning to make rifled barrels by the tens of thousands. Sure, anybody who is competent can rifle 10 or even 50 barrels a month, but these companies need barrels in far larger numbers, and that’s not only an investment in production capability, but also in expertise. Just ask Crosman about learning to rifle accurate PCP barrels. It took them years to make the transition, and they still buy barrels for several of their guns.

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