ISSC M22 Air Pistol

ISSC M22 Air Pistol

A small step down in caliber and a big step up for airguns

By Dennis Adler

Mirror images, the ISSC M22 Gen2 .22LR semi-auto (right) and ISSC M22 .177 semi-auto (left) offer two ways to train for handling Glock subcompacts only with more affordable ammunition (and more affordable guns!)

Mirror images, the ISSC M22 Gen2 .22LR semi-auto (right) and ISSC M22 .177 semi-auto (left) offer two ways to train for handling Glock subcompacts, only with more affordable ammunition (and more affordable guns!)

It is unusual for a new pistol and a matching .177 caliber airgun to come out at nearly the same time, which in gun years can be years, but in this instance 2016 for the M22 airgun and 2015 for the ISSC M22 Gen2. (The original M22 model was produced from 2009 to 2014 and replaced by the improved Gen2 version last year).

With exact measurements to the .22LR ISSC model, and almost identical features, the .177 caliber blowback action semi-auto provides an affordable alternative to even the .22 caliber model, while offering up one of the best all around semi-auto airguns of the year.

With exact measurements to the .22LR ISSC model, and almost identical features, the .177 caliber blowback action semi-auto provides an affordable alternative to even the .22 caliber model, while offering one of the best all around semi-auto airguns of the year.

The airgun is a 1:1 reproduction of the ISSC M22 and is also a fully licensed design, so it bears all of the .22LR model’s markings, including cal. 22lr which is unusual for an airgun. (Perhaps a bit too accurate as this can be confusing to someone not familiar with the gun, but when you depress the magazine release and a combination CO2 and BB magazine drops out, instead of a .22LR magazine it’s pretty clear). In size, weight, and features the airgun also uses a polymer frame and metal slide, and like the .22LR, has identical controls, a blowback action slide, molded-in finger grooved frontstrap, a working hammer, and blade trigger safety. Oddly, for the airgun the ambidextrous manual thumb safeties (a redundant safety feature of the .22LR since it has the blade trigger safety) are non-functional on the airgun and just molded into the slide. The CO2 version does have the same dustcover accessory rail as the .22LR, making the airgun suitable for training with short (compact) lights or lasers. And training is one of the key points about the ISSC M22 airgun. read more


Gletcher Russian Legends PM 1951

Gletcher Russian Legends Part 2

Testing The PM 1951 – The Pistolet Makarova

By Dennis Adler 

The Gletcher Russian Legends PM 1951 is a nearly perfect CO2-powered copy of the original Soviet pistol.

The Gletcher Russian Legends PM 1951 is a nearly perfect CO2-powered copy of the Soviet pistol that replaced the Tokarev TT-33.

We know that some gun designs are timeless, and that for others time runs out, and even though they may remain “timeless classics” like the Broomhandle Mauser, their production comes to an end. In the 1950s, this was to be the fate of the Tokarev TT-33.

Gletcher Russian Legends PM 1951

In recreating historic handguns as air pistols manufacturers like Gletcher steer clear of using plastics for their airgun construction, and by using all metal components, their CO2 copies of famous vintage handguns not only provide greater durability, but more accurate styling, proper weight, and methods of operation through blowback semi-auto actions. Blowback designs serve multiple purposes, not only for realism, but to chamber the next BB from the magazine or re-cock the hammer on hammer-fired models like the PM or Pistolet Makarova Model 1951, the Soviet pistol that would replace the Tokarev TT-33. read more


Gletcher Russian Legends Tokarev TT

The Gletcher Russian Legends Tokarev TT, PM 1951 and APS

Blowback action reproductions of the Soviet Union’s most famous pistols

Part 1 The Tokarev TT

By Dennis Adler

The Gletcher TT has authentic lines with few exceptions, like the slide serrations which are copied from a Colt rather than the TT-33. The slide and magazine release are very accurate, as are the hard rubber grips and lanyard loop at the bottom of the frame.

The Gletcher TT has authentic lines with few exceptions. The vertical slide serrations are copied from the post WWII version of the TT-33 rather than the original design which had evenly spaced elliptical and vertical serrations. The slide and magazine release are very accurate, as are the hard rubber grips and lanyard loop at the bottom of the frame.

The Soviet Union’s 7.62mm Tokarev TT-30 and TT-33 semiautomatic pistols, which had been adopted by the Red Army in 1934, quickly earned the trust of Russian soldiers during WWII, and continued to grow in popularity because of their power and reliability. In the 1930s the Tokarev was considered a significant step up from the old 19th century Nagant Model 1895 revolvers that had been in use for more than 40 years, and still remained in use even into WWII. The wheels of change had, however, been set into motion after the First World War when the Russian military recognized that their sturdy but antiquated,7-shot Nagant revolvers had to be replaced by a modern military handgun, and by modern, that meant a semiautomatic pistol. read more


Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 Part 2

Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712

“The Gun that Stunned the West”

Part 2 – Testing the Umarex Model 712

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Mauser 712 version, while lacking the lustrous blued finish of an original, has hit all of the key operating features, particularly for the Model 712, arguably the most desirable of any Mauser Broomhandle model because of its selective fire mechanism.

The Umarex Mauser Model 712 version, while lacking the lustrous blued finish of an original, has hit all of the key operating features from the original 1932 model, arguably the most desirable of any Mauser Broomhandle because of its selective fire mechanism and interchangeable box magazine.

The original Broomhandle Mauser (actually referred to by Mauser as the Pistole 7.73 until the Model 1930 and Model 712 were introduced), was a well-balanced gun with its center of gravity forward of the trigger to reduce muzzle jump. Recoil was more linear with the mass of the bolt slamming back over the hammer, and delivering its energy into the grip. As with all Broomhandle models the sharp recoil also drove the edges of the metal frame between the grips into the web of the shooter’s hand, which fortunately is not a problem with the Umarex airgun. read more


Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712

Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712

“The Gun that Stunned the West”

Part 1 – A Little Mauser History

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Legends Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 is one of the most accurate to the original airguns ever produced.

The Umarex Legends Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 is one of the most accurate to the original airguns ever produced.

There once was a Sheriff from Anadarko, and no, that’s not the beginning of a limerick, but it is the beginning of a change in handguns that swept across what remained of the American West at the turn of the century. By 1900, a slow but continual shift from traditional revolvers to semiautomatic handguns was taking place. The first successful American made semi-auto pistols were manufactured by Colt and designed by John M. Browning. He had also patented a semi-auto design for Fabrique Nationale in Belgium which became the 7.65mm (.32 ACP) Model 1899-FN and improved Model 1900-FN. The later version is historically noted as being among the handguns carried by Cheyenne, Wyoming, Deputy Sheriff Richard Proctor, who arrested Tom Horn for murder in 1902. It was, however, the German influence that made one of the most stunning contributions to the change from revolvers to semiautomatics, not only by lawmen and outlaws, but the U.S. government as well. read more


CP99

Walther CP99 

The original skill set trainer 16 years later

By Dennis Adler

Still one of the best 9mm semi-autos in the world, the Walther P99 (left) was introduced to the U.S. market in 1995 and purchased by a number of U.S. law enforcement agencies. Five years later Walther introduced the CO2 version, CP99. It was used as a training gun for German police. After 16 years the CP99 remains one of the most popular of all Walther pellet guns.

Still one of the best 9mm semi-autos in the world, the Walther P99 (left) was introduced to the U.S. market in 1995 and purchased by a number of U.S. law enforcement agencies. Five years later Walther introduced the CP99 CO2 version. It was used as a training gun for German police. After 16 years the CP99 remains one of the most popular of all Walther pellet guns.

Back in 2000 Umarex unveiled an innovative air pistol design, the Walther CP99 pellet gun. There was nothing new about pellet guns, or Walther airguns, but this airgun had a mission, it was as physically close in detail and basic handling as the 9mm Walther P99 being used by German police departments, as well as state and local law enforcement agencies in the U.S. (or the Smith & Wesson built version, the S&W 99 manufactured from 2000 to 2004). read more


Umarex HK MP5 K

Umarex HK MP5 K

Your Very Own Personal PDW

By Dennis Adler

Umarex started with .22 LR versions of the famous HK MP5, and using similar metal and polymer construction has built the MP5 K PDW in .177 caliber. The airgun has the folding stock and full operating features like the original.

Umarex started with .22 LR versions of the famous HK MP5, and using similar metal and polymer construction has built the MP5 K-PDW in .177 caliber. The airgun has a folding stock (something you can’t have with the .22 caliber MP5 models) and full operating features like the 9mm model.

This is a story that begins with a bang, the sound of a .22 caliber rifle being fired. Over the past seven years the popularity of .22 LR copies of famous military handguns and rifles has grown exponentially as new models have become available, and there are more and more each year, mainly through the ingenious designers and manufactures at Umarex and their licensed reproductions of legendary arms like the Uzi Pistol and Carbine, the HK MP5, Colt AR-15 (and later variations), the HK 416 and Colt 1911 Government Model. It comes as no surprise then that Umarex has also done the same with .177 caliber models in recent years including the famous HK MP5 K-PDW (Personal Defense Weapon). read more