Umarex Walther P.38

Umarex Walther P.38

Recreating one of the most influential semi-auto handgun designs of the 20th Century

By Dennis Adler 

As authentic as possible, the Umarex Walther P.38 is a near visual match for the real vintage pre-WWII model at top right!

As authentic as possible, the Umarex Walther P.38 is a near visual match for the real vintage pre-WWII model at top left! (WWII P.38 holsters courtesy World War Supply)

I have to admit a certain prejudice for this Umarex model because I collect Walther P.38 pistols, and when I first saw this .177 caliber version a few years ago it immediately went to the top of my must have list. If you have any interest in legendary German handgun designs or the evolution of handguns in the 20th Century, it should go to the top of your airgun list as well. Here’s why. read more


Sig Sauer P250 ASP

Sig Sauer P250 ASP

Built for training and ready for the 10 meter target range

By Dennis Adler

The Sig Sauer P250 ASP is also a DAO (double action only) design and is offered in two finishes, all black or two tone with an OD green frame and black slide.

The P250 ASP is a DAO design and is offered in two finishes, all black or with an OD green frame and black slide.The blowback action pellet gun uses a reversible rotary 8+8 capacity magazine.

Introduced in 2008, the original DAO, cartridge-firing Sig Sauer P250 was specifically designed to address the future needs of the military, law enforcement, and civilian shooters around the world. Offered in 9mm, .40S&W and .45ACP, the P250’s innovative construction pioneered Sig Sauer’s current series of modular designs that enable users to interchange the frame, barrel and magazine for three different platforms; subcompact, compact, and full size, by moving the fire control housing from one frame to another. This also allows a change in caliber from 9mm to .40S&W or .45 ACP all with the same serialized fire control housing (technically “the gun”). This model formed the basis for the new Sig Sauer P250 ASP (Advanced Sport Pellet) blowback action pellet gun, which is a near one-to-one match to the full size P250 model, and designed to provide hands-on experience with a comparably styled handgun. This is more so in terms of trigger pull, sighting, and operating the magazine release, than in the overall operation of a cartridge-firing P250 model. read more


Blowback Action Airgun Maintenance

Blowback Action Airgun Maintenance

Even Air Pistols Need Cleaning

By Dennis Adler

Even an air pistol needs to be cleaned from time to time, especially blowback action models that have more moving parts and slide to frame contact that can suffer more wear over time, just like cartridge-firing semi-autos.

Blowback action airguns have more moving parts and slide to frame contact areas that can suffer surface wear over time, just like cartridge-firing semi-autos.

Air pistols do not generate heat nor do they require gun powder as a propellant, thus the two primary reasons for cleaning a cartridge-firing handgun are absent. In fact, CO2 air pistols are almost maintenance free. Almost, however, means that even an air pistol needs to be cleaned from time to time, especially blowback action models that have more moving parts and slide to frame contact that can create surface wear over time, just like cartridge-firing semi-autos. read more


Umarex Beretta Model 92A1

Umarex + Beretta + 92A1 = Perfection

The latest Beretta Model 92 airgun sets a new standard

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Beretta Model 92A1 is as close to the 9mm version as an airgun can get. It even fits most exisitng 92A1 holsters. (Galco Combat Master shown)

The Umarex Beretta Model 92A1 is as close to the 9mm version as an airgun can get. It even fits most exisitng 92A1 holsters. (Galco Combat Master shown)

For as long as I have been writing about airguns there has always been a top drawer Umarex Beretta Model 92. Some 15 years ago, when I co-authored the 1st Edition Blue Book of Airguns with Dr. Robert Beeman, one of the airguns on the cover was the new Umarex Beretta Model 92FS pellet gun, a visually striking copy of the military’s standard issue sidearm (adopted in 1985 to replace the Colt Model 1911A1). But it was a traditional multiple-shot pellet gun under the skin, and internally it functioned more like a revolver using an 8-shot cast alloy rotary pellet magazine inserted into the breech by pressing the slide release and allowing the front half of the barrel and slide to move forward so the rotary magazine could be inserted. The CO2 was loaded into the left side of the grip frame (by pressing the magazine release which pushed the left grip panel out to be removed), and exposing the CO2 loading channel underneath. It was and remains to this day a very slick air pistol that has the look, feel and weight of a 9mm Beretta 92FS. It is also a very accurate 10 meter pellet gun. However, what Umarex has achieved in the 15 years since the 92FS pellet gun was introduced is nothing short of remarkable, and the latest (2015) Umarex Beretta Model 92A1 blowback action BB gun sets a new standard. read more


Concealed Carry Weapons Training with Airguns

CCWT Part 2 

Drawing Practice and Stepping Down to A Subcompact 

By Dennis Adler 

Concealed carry techniques all have the same requirement, a handgun and holster that can be comfortable worn out of sight but easy to access if needed.

Concealed carry techniques all have the same requirement; a handgun and holster combination that can be comfortably worn out of sight but remain easy to access if needed.

I have had a concealed carry weapons permit for over 20 years and the majority of handguns I have carried have been compact and subcompact semi-autos or revolvers, and almost all carried in a belt holster worn at the 4 o’clock position. The vast majority of CCW permit holders go with a smaller compact or subcompact handgun and one of the smallest 9mm models available, and most definitely one of the narrowest at 1-inch, is the Walther PPS and new PPS M2. The matching Walther PPS blowback action airgun is one of the most technically accurate of all the Walther air pistols and ideal for this discussion on training with airguns. But first let’s look at concealed carry drawing practice. read more


Concealed Carry Weapons Training with Airguns

CCWT Part 1

Concealed Carry Weapons Training with Airguns

By Dennis Adler 

Using blowback action semi-auto airguns like the Sig Sauer P226 X-Five and Walther PPS combined with holsters for the cartridge-firing models can be a training asset.

Using blowback action semi-auto airguns like the Sig Sauer P226 X-Five and Walther PPS combined with holsters for the cartridge-firing models can be a training asset. 

Happiness is never having to say, “I hate carrying this gun!” When it comes to finding the handgun and holster that works best for you, and I mean “you” the person reading this, no matter what you have read, no matter how good it sounds or looks, until you try it, live with it, and become comfortable and proficient with it, it’s only words. This is where training with airguns that duplicate the size, operating features, weight and handling of their cartridge-firing counterparts can save you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars and help make the final decision on what handgun to carry and how to carry it. read more