Dan Wesson and S&W revolvers

Dan Wesson 4.5mm pellet model vs. S&W 327 TRR8 .177 BB model

Wheelgun Shootout – which gun and caliber is best

By Dennis Adler

Based on the Dan Wesson Model 15-2, the ASG models are all-metal construction and available in .177 caliber BB and .177 (4.5mm) pellet. The pellet version (rear) also has a rifled barrel for improved accuracy. The Umarex S&W TRR8 has a 6-inch smoothbore barrel and comes with top and bottom rails.

Based on the Dan Wesson Model 15-2, the ASG models are available in .177 caliber BB and 4.5mm pellet versions. The pellet model (rear) also has a rifled barrel. The Umarex S&W 327 TRR8 has a 6-inch smoothbore barrel and comes with top and bottom rails.

If you are “old school” and like original-style wheelguns, in other words traditional revolvers, the airgun world has a lot to offer with models that are the .177 and 4.5mm caliber equivalents of many of the most famous Colt, S&W, and Dan Wesson models produced. Cartridge firing revolvers produced since the late 19th century have used swing out cylinders that chamber from five to eight cartridges, depending upon the model. With cartridge loading BB and pellet revolvers like the Dan Wesson and S&W Model 327 TRR8, the difference between the actual .357 magnum/.38 caliber wheelguns and their CO2-powered counterparts are pretty much what they are shooting and a significant lack of recoil. read more


Umarex Steel Storm

Umarex Steel Storm

Putting reality on hold to build the ultimate .177 cal. shooting experience!

By Dennis Adler

Combining elements of the Mini Uzi and MAC 10, the Umarex Steel Storm is a true subgun with selective fire burst control. It is shown with Umarex/Walther MRS holographic weapons sight and FLR650 tactical light and red laser.

Combining elements of the Mini Uzi and MAC 10, the Umarex Steel Storm is a true subgun with selective fire burst control. It is shown with Umarex/Walther MRS holographic weapons sight and FLR650 tactical light and red laser.

I am always writing about authenticity, the accuracy found in the small details of blowback action air pistols and double action revolvers. But sometimes you have to throw all that out the window. The best reason I have found in the last few years is a selective fire .177 caliber BB pistol made by Umarex with the unlikely name, Steel Storm. Sounds like the title for an action adventure film, and there is plenty of action when you pull the trigger on this CO2-powered machine pistol. read more


The CZ-75 on air

The CZ-75 on air Part 2

Classic CZ design and performance in 4.5mm caliber

By Dennis Adler

A nearly perfect copy of the 9mm CZ-75, the ASG CZ-75 air pistol is marked in European caliber 4.5mm. While 4.5mm is often associated with pellet-firing air pistols, it is the same caliber as .177 which is generally used for BB-firing air pistols; the two are interchangeable. The ASG CZ-75 combines the designs of the standard CZ-75 model with the extended capacity magazine base plate used on the CZ-75 SP-01 tactical model.

A nearly perfect copy of the 9mm CZ-75, the ASG CZ-75 air pistol is marked in European caliber 4.5mm. While 4.5mm is often associated with pellet-firing air pistols, it is the same caliber as .177 which is generally used for BB-firing air pistols; the two are interchangeable. The ASG CZ-75 combines the designs of the standard CZ-75 model with the extended capacity magazine base plate used on the CZ-75 SP-01 tactical model.

There is no question that the CZ-75 is one of the best built pistols in the world. CZ has developed more than 35 variations for military, law enforcement, and civilian use, including specific models for sports and competition shooting.

The accurate details in the ASG CZ-75 are reflected in the slide and magazine release levers and the thumb safety. The triggerguard and hammer designs are based on the standard c.1975 CZ-75 model; later CZ-75B models have a round, skeletonized hammer and a squared-off triggerguard. This air pistol has a more “classic” CZ-75 look.

The accurate details in the ASG CZ-75 are reflected in the slide and magazine release levers and the thumb safety. The triggerguard and hammer designs are based on the standard c.1975 CZ-75 model; later CZ-75B models have a round, skeletonized hammer and a squared-off triggerguard. This air pistol has a more “classic” CZ-75 look.

To disassemble (fieldstrip) the 9mm CZ-75 and .177 caliber models, the procedure is identical. After removing the magazine and clearing the gun, the hammer is cocked and the slide is pushed back just slightly to align the registration marks on the slide and frame. Once aligned, all that’s required is to press the slide release shaft protruding on the right side of the frame, which pushes the release lever away from the left side of the frame, allowing it to be easily removed. Push the slide a little further to the rear and then pull it forward off the frame.

To fieldstrip the 9mm CZ-75 and 4.5mm models, remove the magazine and clear the gun, cock the hammer, push the slide back just slightly to align the registration marks on the slide and frame. Once aligned, press the slide release shaft protruding on the right side of the frame (this moves the release lever away from the left side of the frame) then remove it. Push the slide a little further to the rear and then pull it forward off the frame.

All CZ-75 models are robust looking pistols with a streamlined, military bearing, set off by a large thumb safety and slide release, a heavily buttressed triggerguard and large, hand-filling grips. In comparison with a standard CZ-75B, the 4.5mm air pistol vs. the 9mm semi-auto, comes in with the same capacity (16+1 in 9mm, 17 in 4.5mm), both have metal frames, plastic grips, a DA/SA trigger system, fixed sights (the CZ has white dot sights, the airgun’s are flat black with a serrated front ramp), the 9mm’s barrel is 4.6 inches in length, the smoothbore airgun barrel is 4.25 inches, the weight is a modest  1.95 ounces lighter, at 33.25 ounces vs. 35.2 for the 9mm. Overall length is the same at 8.1 inches, and the airgun’s height is slightly greater than the CZ-75B at 5.76 inches with the CZ-75 SP-01 magazine base. The standard CZ-75 is 5.4 inches in height. The airgun’s width is 1.25 inches, a minuscule 0.15 inches narrower than a 9mm. read more


The CZ-75 on air

The CZ-75 on air Part 1

Doing the Česká zbrojovka name proud!

By Dennis Adler

A slight mix of two models, the original style CZ-75 and the later CZ-75 SP-01, the ASG 4.5mm air pistol is a remarkable Česká zbrojovka branded CO2 model with full blowback action and CZ-75 SP-01 design 17-round CO2 BB magazine.

A slight mix of two models, the original style CZ-75 and the later CZ-75 SP-01, the ASG 4.5mm air pistol is a remarkable Česká zbrojovka branded CO2 model with full blowback action and CZ-75 SP-01 design 17-round CO2 BB magazine.

Aside from Česká zbrojovka, the original Czechoslovakian manufacturer, the CZ-75 has been duplicated by more than 20 different armsmakers over the decades, and some with very familiar names. Regardless of whether it is a Baby Desert Eagle, a Jericho, or a Tanfoglio Limited Custom or Gold Custom, they are all based on the Model CZ-75 (introduced in 1975), including the European American Armory Witness series, seven different models from TriStar Arms, nine from Eagle Imports, the Turkish-built Canik TP 9V2 and the very pricey Swiss-built Sphinx SDP series. It is no surprise then that a .177 (4.5mm) caliber blowback action CZ-75 is also manufactured and licensed by Česká zbrojovka. (The easiest pronunciation is chess-ka za-brav-ka which translates to Czech armory). read more


Colt Python

The Umarex Colt Python Part 2

Putting the legendary DA/SA six-gun to the test

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Colt Pythons are offered in two finishes, a deep flat blue black and nickel (chrome). The Python CO2 airguns rekindle a romance with the Colt double action/single action revolvers that were discontinued for the last time in 2006 with the Python Elite. Previous Python models were discontinued after 1996.

The Umarex Colt Pythons are offered in two finishes, a deep flat blue black and nickel (chrome). The Python CO2 airguns rekindle a romance with the Colt double action/single action revolvers that were discontinued for the last time in 2006 with the Python Elite. Previous Python models were discontinued after 1996. 

The moment you pick up the Colt Python airgun you have a sense of authenticity in their weight, balance, and very familiar operation. The guns even fit existing Colt Python holsters like the Galco thumb break belt holster shown. With a very modest suggested retail the Pythons are available in a deep matte blued black or nickel (actually chrome) finish with authentic wood grained or black checkered plastic grips. read more


Colt Python

The Umarex Colt Python Part 1

A different kind of Snake Gun

By Dennis Adler

A legendary Colt revolver returns with the .177 caliber Python. The Colt authorized Umarex wheelgun is a near perfect copy of the fabled .357 magnum revolver introduced in 1955.

A legendary Colt revolver returns with the .177 caliber Python. The Colt authorized Umarex wheelgun is a near perfect copy of the fabled .357 magnum revolver introduced in 1955.

Collectors call them “snake guns,” Pythons, Diamondbacks, Cobras, Anacondas, King Cobras, etc. Colt once had an entire lineup of famous double action revolvers named after snakes, and each and every one, in its own right, has become collectible, some more than others. At the top of the order was the Colt Python. Back in the 1950s and well into the late 20th Century, revolvers were king among law enforcement sidearms, and one of the most popular was the Colt Python .357 magnum revolver. read more


The 7-1/2 inch Colt Peacemaker

The 7-1/2 inch Colt Peacemaker

Recreating the original Single Action Army in 4.5mm caliber

By Dennis Adler

                                                                 Vincit qui patitur, “He conquers who suffers.”

                                                                                                             – Samuel Colt

The “long arm” of the law was often extended by the 7-1/2 inch barrel length of the Colt Peacemaker, which was favored by a vast majority of frontier Sheriffs, City Marshals and U.S. Marshals.

The long arm of the law was extended by the 7-1/2 inch barrel length of the Colt Peacemaker which was favored by a vast majority of frontier Sheriffs and U.S. Marshals.

Although Samuel Colt had patented the first successful single action revolver in 1835 and been responsible for the greatest percussion revolvers of the mid 19th Century, he would have no part in creating his final legacy, the most enduring Colt revolver of all time, the 1873 “New Model Army Metallic Cartridge Revolving Pistol” better known today as the Colt Peacemaker. read more