The 100th Airgun Experience

The 100th Airgun Experience

What have we learned?

By Dennis Adler

History has, in a way, dictated which guns are the most significant, among them the great Webley MKVI. As a manufacturer, Webley also has a lengthy history building airguns, so their c. 1937 MKVI in .177 caliber is based on the same blueprint as the original .455 caliber military revolver.

History has, in a way, dictated which guns are the most significant, among them is the great Webley MKVI. As a manufacturer Webley also has a long history building airguns and their c. 1937 MKVI in .177 caliber is based on the same blueprint as the original .455 caliber military revolver. (Webley holster by World War Supply, belt courtesy John Bianchi)

It’s hard to believe, but here we are at No. 100. A lot of airguns have been tested in the previous 99 Airgun Experience articles. When I set out to create this series of short features, rather than following a traditional blog format, I decided to write and illustrate them as I would for a magazine. This comes from 40 years in the print media world as an author, editor and publisher; it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Hopefully, those of you who have followed the Airgun Experience throughout the last 99 articles and others who have recently started to read the columns on Pyramyd Air have come to appreciate the depth and detail in each review. The goal has always been to inform, illustrate, and educate as much as possible, not only with reviews of the airguns but their use for enhancing firearms knowledge and improving shooting skills. read more


ASG Dan Wesson 2-1/2 inch Model 715

New ASG Dan Wesson 2-1/2 inch Model 715 snub nose pellet revolver

Short and to the point Part 2

By Dennis Adler

This holster normally holds an S&W Model 325 PD-Airlite .45 ACP snub nose revolver but is a perfect fit for the ASG Dan Wesson Model 715 snub nose. The grips on the Dan Wesson are actually very close in size to those on the S&W.

This holster normally holds an S&W Model 325 PD-Airlite .45 ACP snub nose revolver but is a perfect fit for the ASG Dan Wesson Model 715 snub nose. The grips on the Dan Wesson are actually very close in size to those on the S&W.

It’s no secret that I have a preference for snub nose revolvers regardless of caliber, and the new ASG Dan Wesson Model 715 snub nose is remarkably authentic in its design and handling. The 4.5mm (.177) caliber model has the heft and feel of a real .357 Magnum, and it fits the appropriate holsters, including an old pancake-style belt rig I have had for more than 20 years. It was designed for large frame S&W models and is a perfect fit for the Dan Wesson CO2 pistol, as well. A good design never goes out of style. read more


ASG Dan Wesson 2-1/2 inch Model 715

New ASG Dan Wesson 2-1/2 inch Model 715 snub nose pellet revolver

Short and to the point Part 1

By Dennis Adler

The new ASG Dan Wesson Model 715 snub nose has a 2-1/2 inch barrel with full shroud and a single vent in the rib. It uses the same Hogue-style rubber grip design and sights as the 6-inch model 715 and new 4-inch version.

The new ASG Dan Wesson Model 715 snub nose has a 2-1/2 inch barrel with full shroud and a single vent in the rib. It uses the same Hogue-style rubber grip design and sights as the 6-inch model 715 and new 4-inch version.

Sam Colt invented the snub nose revolver. Of course, back in 1836 it was a very small caliber pistol (.28 and .31 caliber chamberings) and the 5-shot revolvers were also small enough to fit in the palm of a man’s hand. It wasn’t until the Civil War that the Colt’s Patent Fire-Arms Mfg. Co. built its first .36 caliber snub nose model, a limited run of from 25 to 50 Pocket Police versions with 2-inch barrels. Colt’s built another run of 3-1/2 inch barrel length versions (also known as the Pocket Police Trapper Model), which again was limited to about 50 examples. In 1882 the next snub nose Colt, a 2-1/2 inch version of the 1873 Peacemaker, was built as a single example; it took Colt’s until 1888 to begin offering a SAA model with a 3-1/2 inch barrel, famously known today as the Sheriff’s Model. This was the first “official” short barreled production Peacemaker; however, Colt’s had offered barrel lengths of 2-1/2 inches up to 16 inches since 1876. By then, of course, every American armsmaker was selling short barreled revolvers, including Smith & Wesson, without which there would never have been a Dan Wesson Model in the 20th century with a 2-1/2 inch barrel. (The current Dan Wesson Model 715 Pistol Pack comes with a short 4-inch, standard 6-inch and long 8-inch barrel). read more


Colt Peacemaker vs. Schofield

.177 caliber Colt Peacemaker vs. Schofield Topbreak Revolver

Two Gun Lawman Part 2

Historically, double gun rigs were less common, they did exist, and there are photographs to document it, including images of Wild Bill Hickok. The period correct holsters worn by the author with the Umarex Colt Peacemaker and Bear River Schofield are of the California Pattern design on a narrow 2-inch cartridge belt.

Double gun rigs were less common but period photographs document them, including images of Wild Bill Hickok. The period correct holsters worn by the author with the Umarex Colt Peacemaker and Bear River Schofield are a California Pattern design on a 2-inch cartridge belt.

By creating limited edition, hand engraved models of the Colt Peacemaker and Schofield, a grand tradition in American arms making is being preserved. For the 7-1/2 inch hand engraved Peacemaker Adams & Adams have used the same L.D. Nimschke pattern as the 5-1/2 inch model, only on an all nickel gun. To do hand engraving on an alloy framed pistol, achieve the depth and detail of the original 19th century hand engraved models by Nimschke, Helfricht, and others takes a skilled hand. This is a softer metal than cartridge guns which are hardened steel. Recreating the L.D. Nimschke designs on the Umarex Colt Peacemakers is no different than working on a .45 Colt Single Action. The end result still combines the flowing scrollwork, foliate designs, and punch dot backgrounds necessary to cover the frame and topstrap, barrel, ejector housing, triggerguard and backstrap. Colt engraving varies by the percentage of coverage and barrel length for the most part, and must also incorporate engraving to surround the Colt’s patent dates on the left side of the frame and the Rampant Colt emblem at the rear. read more