Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 1

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 1

The third gun of the American West and Frank James favorite

By Dennis Adler

Frank and Jesse James were well armed and carried a variety of guns including three popular makes of single action revolvers, a Third Model Merwin Hulbert Pocket Army with a 7-inch barrel and ivory grips, an S&W topbreak, both carried by Jesse, and at least two Remington Model 1875 revolvers favored by Frank. Jesse also used the .44-40 Remingtons as well as a Colt SAA. (Holsters by Jim Barnard/TrailRider Products)

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 2
Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 3
Think of the Remington Model 1875 as the conclusion of a trilogy. In the great panorama of the American West there were many guns, but when it comes to revolvers, there were three that stood head and shoulders above the rest, Colt, Smith & Wesson, and Remington; three names that survive to this day. The Remington Model 1875 was literally the third great western cartridge revolver of the trio, though Remington was historically the oldest armsmaker in America. Unfortunately, E. Remington & Sons didn’t build its first revolver until 1857, 23 years after Samuel Colt’s first revolver, and the same time that S&W introduced America’s first cartridge-loading revolver. Remington had been in business since 1816 as a barrel maker, and never quite caught up with either Colt’s or S&W in the 1800s. Still, those who carried Remington revolvers from the late 1850s and throughout the Civil War remained loyal to the brand as the Ilion, New York armsmaker played catch-up to Colt and S&W. The Remington Model 1875 became their most famous large caliber cartridge revolver and remained in production until 1888, when it was replaced with the little remembered Model 1888 and then Model 1890, which only lasted until 1894, when Remington abandoned the revolver market. Although the Model 1890 sold only around 2,000 examples, the Model 1875 saw far greater success with nearly 40,000 manufactured, at least two of which were carried by outlaw Jesse James’ older brother Frank. read more

Faux Suppressors

Faux Suppressors

Not the sound of silence

By Dennis Adler

A short history of faux suppressors is also a history of semi-auto air pistol designs since 1999. At the rear the hefty tactical model of the original Umarex Beretta 92FS, the XX-TREME with quad rails surrounding the frame and slide for optics, lights, and laser sights. It came with the most effective faux silencer built, which when mounted added a full inch to the barrel length. At center, the original faux suppressor, the Umarex Walther PPK/S, and the latest suppressor-equipped 4.5mm semi-auto, the Sig Sauer P226 ASP.

A reader recently asked about the Air Venturi faux suppressor for the threaded barrel Sig Sauer P226 ASP semi-auto air pistol, and if it either increased velocity or accuracy since it extends the length of the barrel. The answer is no, but to understand why, you need to know a little bit about how real sound suppressors (silencers) work and what effects they have on a pistol, aside from the obvious.

Different designs over a period of 18 years begin in the middle with the .177 caliber Umarex Walther PPK/S, which used a faux silencer with an internal liner. Larger than the barrel, it did nothing to increase velocity or accuracy. At top, the Umarex Beretta 92FS XX-TREME used a faux silencer that threaded into the barrel and extended barrel length by 1-inch inside the suppressor body. The latest, and simplest design is for the Sig Sauer P226 ASP, a simple faux suppressor tube that threads onto the barrel to look exactly like a suppressed pistol. Again, it does nothing to suppress sound, increase velocity or accuracy.

Silencers have been around for a very long time, since about 1902, and in the last 115 years there have been an infinite number of improvements in design, manufacturing, materials, and applications. What most people don’t know is that there is no such thing as a fully silenced firearm, maybe in the movies, where sound effects technicians give silencers the sounds we expect to hear. In reality, the sound varies from silencer to silencer, both by design and by the caliber of gun and type of ammunition being used. And there is no way to suppress the sounds made by a gun’s action; the cycling of a slide, for instance, makes the same noise no matter what’s hanging off the end of the barrel. With a suppressor, a pistol’s discharge is not muted but rather reduced to something akin to a snapping sound, similar to the spring tension being released when firing a small air rifle; nothing that would resemble the report of gunfire to an untrained ear. read more

Sig Sauer MCX Part 3

Sig Sauer MCX Part 3

Tactical Air Rifles and Optics

By Dennis Adler

Optics options for the Sig Sauer MCX air rifle, as well as other tactical designs like the Umarex Beretta CX4 Storm, include very affordable red dot scopes like the BSA RD42 mounted on the Beretta, and UTG CQB red/green scope on the MCX.

Sig Sauer MCX Part 2

Sig Sauer MCX Part 1

As I have noted in Parts 1 and 2 the most important features of the Sig Sauer MCX are its authenticity of design and ability to work in combination with all types of optics from the very expensive Sig Sauer Bravo4 battle sight used on the actual 5.56mm military rifles to affordable air rifle optics like the UTG CQB red/green dot. This is a large 4.25 inch overall length optic with a quick mount release and locking windage and elevation adjustments screws on each click adjustable turret. The second airgun sight tested with the Sig Sauer is a personal favorite, the BSA RD42 which is suitable for pellet rifles and CO2 pistols as well as .22 caliber firearms. This is a durable and proven design that has been around in one form or another for many years. I have an RD42 that is about 10 years old and still works as good as the day it was purchased. It has been on everything from CO2 target revolvers to .22 caliber rifles and worked without fail. read more

Sig Sauer MCX Part 2

Sig Sauer MCX Part 2

Tactical Air Rifles and Optics

By Dennis Adler

Built as a sport shooting pellet rifle and training gun, the Sig MCX ASP has the heft, balance, and handling of the 5.56mm model. The look of the airgun is based on the select fire military version with sound suppressor. The CO2 model is a semi-auto with accurately sized faux suppressor.

Sig Sauer MCX Part 3

Sig Sauer MCX Part 1

The Sig Sauer MCX ASP is a curious air rifle as there are many advantages to Sig’s ASP design, but the company has thus far continued to avoid superfluous features that serve no actual function on an air pistol or air rifle. This has been the case with the Sig Sauer P226 ASP models, and with the MCX and MPX CO2 versions of their tactical (sporting) rifles.

Defining the CO2 powered models

Even close up, the effort Sig Sauer put into crafting controls that look correct comes through. The ambidextrous safety (lower left) and magazine release are the only working parts on the right side of the upper and lower receiver. Also note that each air rifle bears its own proof mark and serial number. The caliber is highlighted in white, while the mandatory safety warning is discretely left neutral to blend into the side of the magazine well.

The Sig Sauer air rifles are semi-auto only (although as air rifles they could have been equipped with a selective fire mechanism), Sig’s goal, however, is to offer their CO2 models as realistic training guns, as well as for recreational use. Sig Sauer’s Airgun Division vice president and general manager, Joseph Huston explained that, “The industry has truly embraced our ASP air rifles and air pistols as excellent training tools when the cost of ammunition, lack of range time or other factors prevent people from training with their centerfire guns as much as they would like or feel they should.” In that respect, the use of inert components saves on the cost of redundant features or those that have no functional role in the airgun’s operation while not compromising the features of the Sig model, leaving only what is necessary for basic handling and firearms training. Personally, I think the closer an airgun intended for training is to its cartridge-firing counterpart the better (and I can use the Umarex S&W M&P 40 as a prime example), but taking the MCX at face value, it is exceptionally well built, and Sig puts its designs through a 15,000 round reliability test. Whether or not you agree with the non-functioning features, the design is sturdy and well built. read more

Sig Sauer MCX

Sig Sauer MCX

Tactical Air Rifles and Optics Part 1

By Dennis Adler

Designed by Sig Sauer for military and law enforcement, the MCX is one of the latest designs for a multi-platform weapon system. The Sig Sauer MCX CO2 model is as close in appearance and basic function as the 5.56mm rifles. The MCX is shown with a Sig Sauer Bravo4 optical battle sight (used on the cartridge models). A Sig Sauer P226 ASP air pistol (holstered) is shown with a UTG tactical vest, tactical gloves and Surefire 2211. The Surefire combines the Luminox watch used by Navy SEALS and other military units with a 300 lumen tactical light.

Sig Sauer MCX Part 2

Sig Sauer MCX Part 3 

This model of the Sig Sauer MCX tactical air rifle is based on the military version with noise suppressor and solid shoulder stock (which is used to house the 88 gram CO2 cylinder). To match it with the actual 5.56mm military version I have also equipped it with the Sig Sauer Bravo4 4x30mm Battle Sight. The Sig Sauer optic is the same used by military and law enforcement and costs considerably more than the air rifle it is mounted on, but if you have the MPX civilian version, the Bravo4 is absolutely the first choice for optics, as it was built for the MPX and MCX air rifles. Throughout this series of articles we will also be reviewing other optics designed for CO2-powered air rifles, but for this first installment I decided to show just how authentic this new Sig Sauer CO2 model can be, and look. read more