Gamo PR-776 vs. Umarex S&W 586

Gamo PR-776 vs. Umarex S&W 586

The You Asked For It Gun Test Part 2 Part 1

By Dennis Adler

The Gamo PR-776 was introduced in 2016 and is a very close relative (in design and manufacturing) to the Umarex S&W licensed 327 TRR8 BB cartridge-loading CO2 model. The main difference, aside from the absence of accessory rails, is that the Gamo uses a swing out cylinder that loads an 8-shot rotary magazine, and thus it looks more like an actual centerfire revolver than the Umarex S&W 586.

The Gamo PR-776 is a relatively new entry into the pellet-firing revolver market, introduced in 2016 it is a variation of the Umarex S&W licensed Model 327 TRR8 (introduced in 2012), without the accessory rails and, ironically, with a correct 8-shot cylinder. The Umarex TRR8 is a 6-shot BB cartridge loading CO2 model, but the similarity of design and general operating features, right down to the double action, single action trigger and S&W Performance Center-inspired barrel contours, is straight out of the TRR8 mold. The best aspect of the Gamo then is that it offers a rifled steel barrel and is designed for 4.5mm pellets, rather than steel BBs. Out of the box, the PR-776 is a better air pistol than the TRR8, despite not using individual cartridges. And I have to add that, “right out of the box” is the big letdown because as nice as the PR-776 appears, it does not come in a box, but rather an un-reusable blister pack. read more

Gamo PR 776 vs. Umarex S&W 586

Gamo PR 776 vs. Umarex S&W 586

The “You Asked For It” Gun Test Part 1

By Dennis Adler

A big, hefty pellet-firing CO2 revolver, the S&W licensed Model 586 with 6-inch rifled steel barrel is a high-quality German crafted target pistol. The finish is a semi-matte black with white lettering.

And we’re back. During the week off I have been looking into availability for a number of very interesting new CO2 models coming out this year, but I have recently been reminded by a few readers that there are some older CO2 models that are still exceptional and that should be written about in Airgun Experience. While older models that have been around for almost 20 years, they can be compared, not only to newer guns, but to each other. One such pair is two pellet-firing revolvers based on classic Smith & Wesson wheelgun designs, the Umarex S&W 586 and newer Gamo (S&W-inspired) PR 776. Both are rotary magazine pellet revolvers capable of 400 fps velocities and superb accuracy out to 10 meters with their 6-inch rifled steel barrels. read more

Umarex Walther PPQ

Umarex Walther PPQ

Not big on change

By Dennis Adler

Were it not for the 4.5mm muzzles these Umarex Walther CO2 models could pass for the 9mm models at a glance. In fact, the CP99 was first used as a training gun when it was released in Germany 18 years ago. Police were already carrying the 9mm P99 and for recruit training the CP99s were used for handling familiarization, magazine reloading (using the same triggerguard ambidextrous magazine releases and extra CO2 magazines). The PPQ CO2 model was introduced 11 years later with the same alterations to the original P99 model, including new rear slide serrations and the addition of front serrations. The airgun is accurate but not exact, lacking the integrated blade trigger safety feature. The PPQ is priced considerably lower than the CP99.

It is funny that I commented about gaining experience through mistakes in a recent article and then made one, well not a mistake, more of a misspoken statement about the Walther PPQ CO2 model being new. In my mind it is new because it is more up to date than the CP99, which was the first modern CO2 pellet model to be introduced by Umarex and Walther.  (The CP88 was earlier but not as new of a firearms design as the then groundbreaking 9mm P99, the first striker-fired DA/SA polymer framed semi-auto).The CP99, as I have mentioned before, was also one of the first modern air pistols to be adopted as a training gun for police and military. It was originally used by German law enforcement to train officers issued the 9mm P99 models. This was almost 20 years ago, and since then many CO2 models have been used for law enforcement and military training, as well as civilian training, most notably the Sig Sauer P226 and S&W M&P40 blowback action CO2 models. But the PPQ has sort of lived in the shadow of the CP99. When it was introduced in 2011 Tom Gaylord reviewed the “new” model. And this is where my personal resistance to change kicked in. read more

Proofing a theory

Proofing a theory

Shooting .177 (4.5mm) Round Pellets through a rifled barrel pistol

By Dennis Adler

Smoothbore BB revolvers like the Bear River Schofield and Remington Model 1875 can fire BB-loading cartridges and also fire pellet-loading cartridges, and do so quite accurately as evidenced by these 21 foot shot playing cards ala John Wesley Hardin.

As we have proven in earlier articles, cartridge-loading smoothbore CO2 BB revolvers that have pellet cartridge-firing counterparts (or pellet-loading cartridges available), can also shoot 4.5mm lead or alloy pellets quite well; not as accurately as a rifled barrel model, but well enough to make it worthwhile with models like the Schofield and Remington. The cartridges are interchangeable, but you would not want to shoot a steel BB in a rifled barrel Colt Peacemaker; it’s a one-way street, unless you want to risk damaging the rifling with a steel BB. read more