First Look: Umarex Glock G19 Part 3

First Look: Umarex Glock G19 Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

Almost the gun you have been waiting for

By Dennis Adler

It is a form of Glock Perfection; the CO2 model is Glock’s first .177 caliber model (there have been Airsoft versions previously) and the G19 looks exactly like a 9×19 Glock pistol in every detail right down to the finish on the slide.

As a Glock training gun the new G19 non-blowback action model serves as a basic hands-on tutorial on holstering, drawing, aiming and firing a G19. It’s a 1-2-3 process that is fundamental to learning to shoot, whether a Glock or any semi-auto or revolver. What is lacking is feedback, i.e., any sense that the gun is working beyond the audible sound of the air pistol firing. No blowback action slide to instruct in sight reacquisition. It is an imperfect trainer in that regard but for practicing the basic handling skills for a Glock, including the magazine release, this less than $80 CO2 pistol has authentic design, weight, balance in the hand, and provides a basis for learning to properly fire a pistol with a Safe Action trigger. With a Glock, aside from specially modified guns, the only safety (externally) is that thin, cantilevered blade projecting from the trigger shoe. Glock put the concept on the map, others, many others, have followed, but no other CO2 semiautomatic air pistol has yet offered a working Glock version until now. read more


First Look: Umarex Glock G19 Part 2

First Look: Umarex Glock G19 Part 2 Part 1

Almost the gun you have been waiting for

By Dennis Adler

This is the air pistol, not an actual 3rd generation G19 but there are only two obvious differences, the crossbolt safety at the top of the trigger and the fact that the otherwise perfect slide that reads GLOCK 19 AUSTRIA is not followed by the 9×19 caliber marking. From an initial hands-on training experience this CO2 model is the same as picking up an actual G19.

How do we begin to evaluate a “new” CO2 pistol that has its design based on a 3rd Generation G19 at a time with the new Gen5 G19 models are out? First, from a purely external view, this is a physically over the top presentation in fine detail in an otherwise underwhelming package that lacks the two vital features most Airgun Experience readers and air pistol enthusiasts regard as obligatory, blowback action and a self-contained CO2 BB magazine. Nevertheless, for the Glock CO2 model, the major visual differences between a G19, G19 Gen4 and new G19 Gen5 are almost all internal, with the exceptions of ambidextrous slide stop levers, new frontstrap configuration without finger grooves (which is similar to the second version Glock grip design pictured in Part 1), new nDLC black nitride-type finish, and a slightly flared mag-well on the new Gen5. Most of these external changes (particularly the grip redesign) are also in concert with Glock 17M and 19M pistols now built for the FBI, the balance of 20 improvements over the Gen4 deal with changes to internal components and the barrel. However, Glock still makes the 3rd generation G19 and Gen4 models as well, so the new CO2 pistol, on the surface, is simply based one of three G19 designs, not a discontinued model. If you look at the 3rd generation G19 as a lower-priced “entry level” model (the MSRP for a standard G19 is $599, the Gen4 $649, and Gen5 $699), then the CO2 model is by intent an “entry level” gun. You have to think Glock. read more


First Look: Umarex Glock G19 Part 1

First Look: Umarex Glock G19 Part 1 Part 2

Almost the gun you have been waiting for

By Dennis Adler

The G19 was the second Glock model. A compact version of the G17 it was introduced in 1988. The G19 has remained a staple of the Glock line through the current Gen4 series. This, by the way, is the new CO2 model not a 9mm G19.

Ever since the 2018 Shot Show and the debut of the Umarex Glock G19 there has been speculation as to what the first model introduced would be. The wait is over; it is an entry level, non-blowback version with a stick magazine. Don’t start screaming yet, there is a lot to understand about getting Glock to the table let alone signing on to have a CO2 version of their groundbreaking 1980’s semi-auto put into production by Umarex. Glock is, in a word, conservative in its manufacturing and marketing as only an Austrian company can be. I have been writing about and testing Glock pistols (as one of the original writers for GLOCK AUTOPISTOLS magazine) for more than a decade and understanding Glock and founder Gaston Glock makes this equally groundbreaking CO2 version of the Glock 19 Compact all the more impressive. But first, let’s go back to what makes a Glock, a Glock. They call it “Glock Perfection” and it is evident even in this entry level CO2 model. read more


1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 3

1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

The Russian Version of BBs vs. Pellets

By Dennis Adler

The Gletcher Model 1895 Nagant pistols deliver design quality, accuracy in features as well as downrange, and a choice of either a smoothbore BB or rifled barrel version. Gletcher also has a nickel silver version which is a sharp looking gun, but very few, if any were originally nickel plated. The blued guns were, however, sometimes engraved. The Gletcher models open up a variety of possibilities for customizing as well as just being authentic copies of one of the most famous military revolvers in history.

Like the Umarex Colt Peacemakers and the ASG Dan Wesson Model 715 double action revolvers, the Gletcher Model 1895 Nagant double actions are a perfect set for BB and pellet-firing cartridges. The Nagant models are also true to their centerfire predecessors with the exception of a manual safety on some of the newer production guns, but even the Peacemakers and Dan Wesson CO2 models are fitted with these added safety mechanisms. And let me digress on that for a moment because there are several reasons for adding manual safeties to air pistols when their centerfire counterparts, except most semi-autos, were never equipped with them. read more


1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 2

1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 2 Part 1

The Russian Version of BBs vs. Pellets

By Dennis Adler

There is a lot to like about the Gletcher Nagant Model 1895, one thing not to like is that they are probably in short supply and when this second series is gone it could be awhile until they are back again. It is an air pistol that vintage military arms enthusiasts should own. Whether you like the BB (bottom) or the pellet version (top), is a matter of personal preference. Either gun is very accurate for its size and barrel length; the plus goes to the pellet cartridge-firing model for its increased accuracy range out to 10 meters. Both airguns fieldstrip like the centerfire pistol, which is a very straightforward process.

Since we are talking about air pistols, it is easier to toss theories around and “in theory” the Nagant BB model with the BB loaded at the front of the cartridge and the cartridge nose sealing with the forcing cone, like the original Nagant Model 1895 design, makes the BB model more authentic in operation than the pellet-firing version which has the pellet seated at the back of the cartridge. It is a very minor point, which, in the past, has proven to favor the rear loading cartridges with Peacemaker BB and pellet models. Will a front loaded BB in the Nagant design have as much velocity and accuracy as a rear loading pellet cartridge model? And just for extra measure, we’ll toss in the wild card by also loading the BB model cartridges with lighter weight (i.e. higher velocity) Dust Devils. In Part 3 we will see which gun performs best at 21 feet and 10 meters, the BB or pellet model. It is a question that has been asked before and now with newer BBs to fire (that did not exist when the first Nagant Model 1895 models were introduced several years ago in the Gletcher Russian Legends series); the outcome should be more interesting. read more


1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 1

1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 1

The Russian Version of BBs vs. Pellets

By Dennis Adler

Gletcher offers back and silver versions of the legendary Model 1895 Nagant revolver. The black .177 caliber BB version (bottom) and the current 4.5mm pellet model NGT RF in black with rifled barrel. These are authentic looking CO2 pistols that reproduce nearly all the features found on the original 1895 models. (Russian Nagant holster courtesy World War Supply)

I know, all we hear about is Russia, Russia, Russia, but I’m taking about Mother Russia, 19th century Russia and the golden age of firearms, a time when America’s captains of industry and armsmakers courted the Russian Czars and lavished them with presentation pistols. Samuel Colt was among the first with a magnificent Gustav Young engraved and gold inlaid 3rd Model Dragoon and a pair of matching 1851 Navy Model revolvers that he personally presented to Czar Nicholas I in 1853 and 1854. By the end of the 19th century, everyone from Colt to Smith & Wesson had sold arms to Russia, but in 1895 Czar Nicholas II turned to the Nagant Brothers in Belgium and purchased their newest double action revolver to rearm his military. read more


Sig vs. Sig Part 3

Sig vs. Sig Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

“We The People” and “The Right of the People”

By Dennis Adler

An incomparable duo, the Sig Sauer WE THE PEOPLE in .45 ACP and 4.5mm are the best match up for design and handling of any 1911 pistols. Firing offhand at varying distances, the two semi-autos are almost identical. That demands a special word of caution about brandishing the CO2 model in public (the cartridge model goes without saying). Almost no one can tell it is an airgun unless they are looking at the muzzle. This is the same caution I gave with the Umarex S&W M&P40 and Sig Sauer P226 X-Five, along with a number of other air pistols that are almost indistinguishable from their centerfire counterparts.

Sig’s 1911 CO2 model is not a quiet air pistol, probably a little louder than most blowback action models and it delivers a decent kick when the slide comes back. Not as much as a .22 pistol, but enough to get a feel for shooting a handgun. Like the Sig Sauer 45 ACP Sig 1911 model the air pistol uses the John M. Browning-designed platform of frame, slide, barrel, and recoil system using a recoil spring guide, single recoil spring, recoil spring plug and barrel bushing. The CO2 model follows the same design with internal modifications to accommodate the CO2 firing system which includes an additional lightly wound recoil spring around the barrel, like a blowback action semi-auto. Externally you are experiencing the .45 ACP model when you pick up Sig’s CO2 version of the WE THE PEOPLE. The flat mainspring housing is finely checkered as is the frontstrap, something you will not find on other 1911 CO2 models. Both Sig 1911 models use ambidextrous thumb safeties, the raised palmswell grip safety with extended beavertail and skeletonized hammer also make the CO2 model identical in handling, such as when manually de-cocking or cocking the hammer if a situation dictates that action. read more