Umarex Legends Lever Action Rifle Part 2

Umarex Legends Lever Action Rifle

The Classic Winchester Model 1894 on air Part 2 Part 1

By Dennis Adler

Whether in 1894 or 125 years later the Winchester Model 1894 is still one of the finest lever action rifles made. Winchester manufactured Model 94s continuously until 2006. The Model 94 rifle was reintroduced in 2011 and the carbine in 2013. The carbine currently retails for $1,200. The Umarex CO2 version is a comparative bargain at an MSRP of $249.99. (The holster worn by the author with a hand engraved Adams & Adams Umarex Colt 5-1/2 inch CO2 model is a copy of Tom Horn’s cartridge belt and holster from the same period as the Model 1894. The holster was reproduced from the original design by Chisholm’s Trail Leather)

The one big complaint about Winchesters in the 1870s had been the limitations of the design for chambering more powerful cartridges. The military wanted a Winchester that could fire the .45-70 Government cartridge used in the single shot Springfield Trapdoor rifles and carbines carried by the Army and mounted troops. Hunters also wanted a more powerful Winchester repeater for taking large North American game. Still, among lawmen, and just about anyone who owned a Winchester, few disparaging words were spoken, especially about the Model 1873. read more


Umarex Legends Lever Action Rifle Part 1

Umarex Legends Lever Action Rifle Part 1

The Classic Winchester Model 1894 on air 

By Dennis Adler

The Winchester Model 1894 was not chambered for pistol cartridges, however, the new Umarex Legends Lever Action Rifle is compatible with the rear BB (and pellet) loading cartridges from the Umarex Peacemaker pistols making this the first companion CO2 rifle for the Colt revolvers.

The rules were simple. They hadn’t changed in over two centuries. You had one shot with a rifle. By the mid 18th century two shots if you had a superposed swivel barrel or a double barreled fowler. Men like Benjamin Tyler Henry, Oliver Winchester, Nelson King, and John Moses Browning, among others, would change that rule beginning in the 1860s and set into motion the wheels of industry that would lead to the manufacture of the Old West’s greatest lever action rifles, the most famous of which would bear the Winchester name. read more


Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver Competition Part 3

Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver Competition Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

The Silver Standard for blowback action 4.5mm target pistols

By Dennis Adler

The X-Five ASP in either the original Black finish or new Silver finish delivers good 10-meter accuracy. While the period of time separating these two models is short, the Silver seems to have upped the game slightly with a lighter feeling trigger, although the two CO2 models have the same internal components. This leads to the question of slight variations from one gun to another and how or if that will influence accuracy.

Picking up where we left off with the Sig Sauer Match Ballistic alloy pellets clocking an average of 401 fps, the next round up is H&N Sport Match Green alloy wadcutters which also weigh 5.25 gr. With a fresh CO2 loaded the high velocity with H&N was 425 fps, the low 398 fps and an average for 10 shots of 404 fps. Switching to the heavier RWS Meisterkugeln 7.0 gr. lead wadcutters, the average velocity dropped to 358 fps with a high of 381 fps and a low of 347 fps for 10 shots. The X-Five ASP shot an average of 44 fps slower with lead wadcutters. read more


Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver Competition Part 2

Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver Competition Part 2 Part 1

The Silver Standard for blowback action 4.5mm target pistols

By Dennis Adler

This is what happens when you make a good gun better. Sometimes all it takes is a change in color, from the first Sig Sauer X-Five ASP’s Nitron-like black finish to a brushed stainless steel look. It’s the same gun, but much more visually appealing. But is there more to it than that?

Sig Sauer’s airgun division has its eye on multiple markets from CO2 powered BB models like the WE THE PEOPLE 1911, to pellet-firing training guns like the new M17 ASP, and as far reaching as target pistols such as the X-Five ASP and ASP20 breakbarrel pellet rifle. The X-Five falls into its own classification within the Sig lineup as the only current pellet-firing target model (with adjustable rear sight) to use the 20-round rotary Rapid Pellet Magazine (RPM).

Like the earlier X-Five the new ASP Silver is slightly larger than the P226 it is based on and is a tough gun to holster. It does, however, fit nicely into a Galco Quick Slide made for the P226 Rail gun. The front sight does not catch on the lip of the holster when drawing the gun.

After a long look at the X-Five ASP, it comes down to the loading and shooting. This is a two step process, loading the CO2 into the grip frame by opening the backstrap panel. This is done by pulling down on the latch (arrow) and letting it swing all the way back to expose the channel and cam-operated CO2 quick loading and piercing system. After the CO2 you load the magazine (and it is a good idea to buy at least two extras, they come in a set of two).

As a dedicated target pistol the X-Five ASP Silver uses the centerfire X-Five-type SAO (single action only) trigger. This almost vertical trigger design was used on the centerfire X-Five competition pistols, but this style trigger is not unique to target pistols or to Sig Sauer. Vertical triggers have been used on everything from semi-auto target pistols to custom Ruger LCP .380 personal defense pistols. One of the early designers of the skeletonized vertical trigger for the LCP, and other pistols, is Eric Galloway. His design for the LCP as a customized model was also adapted by Sturm, Ruger for a limited edition model that has since become known as the “Red Trigger Ruger” which was the best of the original LCP model .380 ACP pistols. read more


Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver Competition Part 1

Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver Competition Part 1

The Silver Standard for blowback action 4.5mm target pistols

By Dennis Adler

The Sig Sauer X-Five ASP Silver is the same as the black model, however, as it has been proven in the past, sighting can be different due to the finish of the slide (silver or nickel compared to blued or matte black). In addition, the 9mm and .40 S&W models were almost all brushed stainless steel, so the ASP is also a little more authentic in its appearance.

Earlier this year Sig Sauer began delivering yet another benchmark CO2 pistol, the X-Five ASP with the standard matte Nitron-look black finish seen on so many handguns. But the actual centerfire competition (X-Five Match) models of the P226 X-Five were brushed stainless (except for the X-Five Tactical with a black Nitron slide and black anodized aluminum frame). The P226 X-Five Series models were produced from 2005 to 2012 including the X-Five Competition, X-Five All Around and Tactical models and as P226 X Series All Around, Classic, Entry, Match, X Open, Super Match, and Tactical in 2014. The current 9mm and .40 S&W X-Five Series are based on the P320. read more


Umarex Glock G17 Blowback Action Model

Umarex Glock G17 Blowback Action Model

A first look at the long awaited CO2 pistol Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

By Dennis Adler

Compared to the vast majority of contemporary handgun manufacturers, Glock is a young company with a mere 36 year history compared to others that have been around for centuries. As a CO2 pistol it is also the newest brand compared to established names like Sig Sauer, Heckler & Koch, Colt, Beretta and Smith & Wesson. Interestingly, Glock’s influence on older armsmakers like Sig, Walther, H&K, and S&W (among others), has led to a new era of striker-fired, polymer-framed pistols following the Glock design method.

I write Airgun Experience for you, the reader, but to be honest, I choose the test guns for myself. I have very specific interests in firearms with a tendency to favor old designs with history (in case you hadn’t noticed). For Glock, history only began in 1982, yet in that comparatively short 36 year span the Austrian armsmaker has accomplished nearly as much manufacturing handguns as companies established more than 150 years ago. Glock has challenged the Colt’s Patent Firearms Mfg. Co., Smith & Wesson, Sig Sauer (originally established in Switzerland in 1860 as Sig Arms AG), FN (Fabrique Nationale) established in Liege, Belgium, in the late 19th century, as well as time-honored armsmakers like Heckler & Koch, Walther, Browning, and Beretta, the world’s oldest firearms manufacturer. Glock has not only held its own but achieved global success in the military, law enforcement, private sector and civilian markets, displacing many of the aforementioned as a primary sidearm. read more


Umarex Glock G17 Blowback Action Model

Umarex Glock G17 Blowback Action Model

A first look at the long awaited CO2 pistol Part 2 Part 1

By Dennis Adler

Making it realistic means making it the right size in every detail and the new Umarex Glock G17 is dimensionally exact to the centerfire Third Model (top) and it fits into all Glock holsters as cleanly as the 9x19mm pistols.

I have said this before but it is worth repeating, a good air pistol doesn’t have to be a training gun but a CO2 training gun has to be a good air pistol. The Umarex Glock G17 qualifies as both. One of the most important features a training gun must have is correct dimensions so that it can interchange with holsters, magazine pouches, and primary accessories used with its centerfire counterpart. Even if you are not looking for a training gun, have no intention of ever owning a centerfire G17, it should at least fit in a G17 holster. When the Umarex Glock G19 came out earlier this year it failed that requirement by being a fraction oversized through the triggerguard which prevented it from fitting into or locking in any G19 level 1 or higher injection molded holsters. It fit tightly into an ASG Strike Systems injection molded Level 1 tactical holster made for a basic size gun, and it fit into almost every leather holster I tried. Leather gives, injection molded holsters don’t. read more