Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 4

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 4

As real as it gets with a CO2 Air Rifle

By Dennis Adler

Doubling up on 10/22s, the new Ruger CO2 model is an almost perfect match for the .22 rifle.

There are a number of excellent CO2 powered air rifles on the market today that duplicate AR-based .223 Remington (5.56x45mm NATO) centerfire platforms, as well as the Sig Sauer MPX and MCX pellet-firing models, and classic military models like the Springfield Armory M1 Carbine. The new Umarex Ruger 10/22 is the only one based on an original .22 LR design, essentially the next step up after a pellet rifle for learning gun handling skills and target shooting. The symbiotic relationship between the 10/22 in .22 LR and the 10/22 CO2 in 4.5mm (.177 caliber), is the closest of any contemporary air rifle to its cartridge-loading counterpart. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 3

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 3

The 10-meter tests and an edge

By Dennis Adler

The .22 LR 10/22 uses an alloy receiver as does the CO2 model and Umarex copied it in every fine detail, including the four drilled and threaded screw holes for mounting the Weaver rail that comes with the 10/22 rimfire model.

I know you’re all wondering what the “edge” is. It is what makes the Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle a bit more authentic. The .22 LR model uses a lightweight alloy receiver, just like the CO2 model, and this is very good news because Umarex followed the exact same receiver design including the four drilled and threaded holes to mount a scope base. The 10/22 rimfire models have a Weaver-style scope adapter, and Ruger also sells them as an accessory item, which means you can purchase one and use it on the CO2 model. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 2

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 2

Measurements and velocity

By Dennis Adler

Overlooking the shorter barrel on the latest Ruger 10/22 Compact, the classic lines of the 1960’s Ruger design still come through even with modern black synthetic stocks. The new CO2 model not only captures the look but the fundamental handling, as well, making this an ideal first gun for anyone working their way up to a rimfire semi-auto rifle. The 10/22 has been that gun for over half a century.

The Ruger 10/22 is an iconic design that has been copied by others and inspired similar designs, (even in CO2 by Crosman) but as executed by Umarex, it is almost a 1:1 version of the modern Carbine with black synthetic stock. And I have to thank Ruger and Umarex for bringing the 10/22 back into my life because it really is a touchstone to my past, as I am sure it is to many of you who may have had, or still own, a Ruger 10/22. As a CO2 model it sizes up as a very authentic gun and with the internal buttstock CO2 loading design, taken from the Umarex Legends Cowboy Lever Action, the 10/22’s exterior lines are superbly duplicated. In fact, measuring the CO2 model against the current black synthetic stock Carbine model, the overall lengths are identical at 37 inches (the CO2 model is 37.1 inches), barrel lengths are 18.5 inches (external length), and weight with the synthetic stock is 5 pounds. The CO2 version tips the scale at 4.5 pounds, a difference you can feel when you pick up the air rifle and compare it to the .22 LR model. The Compact .22 caliber model Ruger sent is 2-inches shorter in overall length with the 16.12 inch barrel. There are a few other minor differences between the Compact and the Carbine including sights, but the standard Carbine in .22 LR has the same folding, windage adjustable rear and bead front sight as the 10/22 Air Rifle (in the comparison photo). read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 1

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 1

Yesterday’s childhood re-imagined

By Dennis Adler

The Ruger 10/22 of my youth was an innovative .22 for the time. The 10-round, rotary magazine fed semi-auto was designed by William B. Ruger, Sr. to be on the same scale and have the same sleek lines as his famous .44 Magnum Carbine. The 10/22 was Ruger’s first .22 and for the better part of the last 50 years it has been the first rifle of young men and women who wanted to learn to target shoot and hunt. In rimfire terms, it is the Red Ryder BB gun of .22s.

I have had a lot of “first” guns, first CO2 pistol, first semi-auto pistol, first revolver, but the Ruger 10/22 was the first rifle I ever owned, well, half owned. My friend Gene and I went in on it, and it was “our first rifle.” That was during my first year of college, and the 10/22 got to be weekend escape recreation, plinking at cans and paper targets in the desert. This was the original Ruger 10/22, about three years after it was introduced in 1964, a lean, simple .22 LR semi-auto with a nice hardwood stock. read more


Sig Sauer P365 Part 6

Sig Sauer P365 Part 6

The bottom line

By Dennis Adler

You might wonder what that channel is for that runs along the frame on both sides beginning just above of the trigger. This is a proprietary accessory rail, like HK has for the USP. In Sig’s case, a traditional Picatinny accessory rail would be too wide for the Micro-Compact’s frame. Sig has already developed laser sights for this gun and will likely have other P365 specific mounting accessories down the road. The CO2 model will accept all of those as well. For now, you just have to settle for the smallest blowback action air pistol with a self-contained CO2 BB magazine that has ever been made.

With 1:1 gun tests there is the overwhelming factor of gun powder vs. CO2 as the propellant, and that’s one thing a blowback action CO2 pistol can never duplicate, the actual felt recoil and sound of a handgun firing. Training with air is absolutely good for fundamental skills that lead up to the moment you pull the trigger. After that point, the two guns go their separate ways. The importance of a good training gun, or understudy as they are often referred to, is that everything up to the moment you pull the trigger is 1:1. It has to feel the same as pulling the trigger on the centerfire model, and obviously the trigger is one very important part of that equation. Only a handful of CO2 models have a trigger pull as close to actual as possible. The question here is, is the Sig Sauer P365 CO2 model one of them? read more


Sig Sauer P365 Part 5

Sig Sauer P365 Part 5

Velocity checks – A fast miss vs. a slow bullseye

By Dennis Adler 

What a good training gun should be, the Sig Sauer P365 gives you a proper hands-on experience comparable to the centerfire model. It is not perfect, but it delivers on feedback and accuracy, if not the velocity of larger blowback action CO2 models.

About 30 years ago, I used to keep a custom built S&W Model 25 with a 2-inch barrel close by when I was off in the desert testing four wheel drive vehicles. A Model 25 is a .45 ACP revolver. A 230 grain hard ball out of a 2-inch barrel wasn’t exactly setting any velocity records. You didn’t need Shoot-N-C targets at the range; you could shoot and see the bullet going downrange. (Not really but muzzle velocity was about 650 to 700 fps). One thing I can say though, is that I didn’t miss too often with that snub nose .45 S&W revolver. What it taught me was that velocity isn’t always as important as accuracy, and that may be the best takeaway from the Sig Sauer P365 CO2 model. It’s not going to surpass other larger blowback action CO2 pistols sending .177 caliber steel balls downrange, but it is probably going to outshoot most of them. read more


Sig Sauer P365 Part 4

Sig Sauer P365 Part 4

Tale of the Tape

By Dennis Adler

This is the Tale of the Tape, the 1:1 comparison between the 9mm Sig Sauer P365 and the .177 caliber CO2 model. Overall length is 5.8 inches, height 4.5 inches, (9mm with finger extension magazine), width 1.0 inches (widest point), barrel 3.1 inches (9mm) trigger pull 6.0 pounds, sights XRAY3 Day/Night (3-dot green front), weight 17.8 ounces (empty), capacity 10+1 and optional 12-round extended magazine. The CO2 model’s overall length is 5.75 inches (the muzzle does not protrude as far from the slide as the 9mm), height 4.5 inches, (with finger extension magazine), width 1.0 inches (widest point), barrel 3.1 inches (smoothbore), trigger pull 5 pounds, 6.0 ounces, white dot rear, green dot front sight, weight 15.0 ounces (empty, lighter weight alloy slide), capacity 12 rounds. Training gun status: Confirmed.

Sig Sauer wanted the P365 to be as authentic in handling as possible for a blowback action CO2 pistol, and in order for the airgun to achieve that goal they had to make one noteworthy compromise with the compact CO2 system to fit within the framework of the 9mm pistol; the gun cannot be field stripped like the centerfire model. It can be disassembled for maintenance but Sig Sauer does not want consumers taking the gun apart, so it is not covered in the instruction manual. On the other hand, and the pictures clearly show this, Sig met its goal of duplicating the size and handling of the P365. The CO2 BB magazine takes up the same amount of space as the 9mm’s (though with different proportional use of the space). One of the more interesting aspects of that, aside from this being the smallest self-contained 12 gr. CO2 BB magazine ever devised for a blowback action air pistol, is that it loads very similarly to the 9mm. The Sig has what I would call a “zero aggravation” loading system for the 12 rounds of .177 caliber steel BBs. read more