Glock Analytics

Glock Analytics

The most buck for the bang!

By Dennis Adler

Umarex has surpassed other airgun manufacturers with the introduction of four new models in a little over a year. Umarex has introduced other airguns during the same time as well, but we are talking four new models of the same brand since last year. So, how do you pick one?

To close out this series on the Umarex Glock models, which, given the very short span of time since the first Glock branded CO2 pistol was introduced, could be something of a record for consecutive new models, I have decided to provide an analysis of all four guns by price, features, and rate each to help make choosing a single gun out of the four models easier. The needs of everyone will not be the same, and there is no “winner” per se, but rather a ranking of features similar to how I calculate Replica Air Pistol of the Year, only we are dealing with one brand of air pistol. In the end one might come out on top and that will help me with 2019’s Replica Air Pistol of the Year competition. But today, this is for those of you pondering more than a dozen articles on Glock CO2 models and wondering which one, if any, to purchase. read more


Umarex Glock 19X Part 4

Umarex Glock 19X Part 4

A good gun for training

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Glock 19X will fit most Glock 19 holsters, like this ASG Strike Force locking paddle holster. The slightly different contours of G19X may require some molded holsters, like the Blackhawk Serpa, to be specifically for the G19X. Leather holsters for the G19 will all very likely fit the 19X as well.

It is time for comparisons with every other Glock CO2 model to end. The G19X can stand on its own. Yes, it is not the perfect Glock Perfection we got with the Gen4 G17, but is it newer, more powerful, as accurate, if not more so, and it has the latest military finish, coyote tan, which beats any previous Glock for appearances. Let’s face it, a Glock is not a pretty gun, and I use “pretty” as a reference to guns that have a sense of artistic styling beyond the needs of function alone. The new rounded slide contours and beveled muzzle on the G19X give the Glock brand something it has always lacked, a touch of character. Or perhaps that is antitype for Glock’s history of building handguns that, as so many writers had said over the last 37 years, looks like the box it came in. A Glock is a sturdy, form follows function tool, (and centerfire Glocks are damned near indestructible), so the company left providing character to the aftermarket, which has done an impressive, if not often overly flamboyant job of making the guns look like anything but a Glock. The Gen5 revisions and coyote tan finish are Glock’s first move in that direction. The Umarex Glock 19X gives us a taste for that change. Regardless of its shortcomings, it is a good shooter, a 1:1 match for its centerfire counterpart (except for that pesky non-functioning right hand slide release; sorry left-handed shooters), and it more than meets the standard for a training surrogate. read more


Umarex Glock 19X Part 3

Umarex Glock 19X Part 3

A shorter, more attractive Third Gen in disguise

By Dennis Adler

Third Gen design vs. Gen5 exterior design is a big switch in how you hold the newest Glock models, and that is true for the latest CO2 guns as well. Slide shape is new, grip contour, especially with G19X, which has the flared base extending over the magazine. In the looks department, it is an easy choice. But inside, except for barrel length, the Third Gen G17 and Gen5 G19X CO2 pistols are the very same gun. That is not a bad thing.

The Glock 19X has the physical presence of an entirely new CO2 model and for all intents and purposes it is, but inside, it is the second of the Umarex Glock model designs, and that brings with it both advantages and disadvantages. Aside from not being able to fieldstrip the G19X, it is the trigger that truly separates the handling between the Third Gen and Gen4 CO2 model operation.

The Third Generation Glock 17-based CO2 model gave us a self-contained CO2 BB magazine, 1:1 dimensions to the centerfire model, and delivered higher velocity than any other blowback action CO2 BB pistol on the market, an average of 376 fps, making the Third Gen Glock 17 suitable for both 7 and 10 yard training exercises, almost impossible with most blowback action air pistols sending BBs downrange at 300 to 320 fps. read more


Umarex Glock 19X Part 2

Umarex Glock 19X Part 2

Two to one – the making of a G19X

By Dennis Adler

The first Umarex Glock CO2 model (far left) was a G19 Third Gen as a non-blowback design. This was followed by a Glock 17 Third Gen design using a short, short-recoil blowback action, a Gen4 Glock 17 with full blowback action and field strippable design, and now a Gen5 “design” Glock 19X in coyote tan.

The requirements of the U.S. Army’s MHS program were for a duty gun that could serve multiple military needs as a standard issue sidearm as well as a handgun for special operations units. Glock did not have a design that would allow for the total modularity that was required, but to meet the size and capacity requirements, they could combine two existing guns to make a new model capable of consideration. Thus the Glock 19X was made of parts from the latest Glock 19 and Glock 17. What Glock created was a gun that provided a shorter barrel and slide length for ease of carry with a frame that allowed the 17+1 standard capacity of a full-sized Glock 9×19 pistol. read more


Umarex Glock 19X Part 1

Umarex Glock 19X Part 1

And the story continues…

By Dennis Adler

The 9x19mm Glock 19X is a civilian version of the model designed by Glock for the U.S. Army’s Modular Handgun System (MHS) program as a replacement for the Beretta M9. Sig Sauer won the trials with the P320/M17, but Glock ended up with a gun that still has wide appeal to certain U.S. military and government agencies as well as the civilian market. The new Umarex Glock CO2 version looks almost identical to the centerfire model. On the U.S. market version the instant giveaway is the absence of 9×19 on the slide, while in Europe, the CO2 models bear the full markings of the centerfire gun.

The evolution of Glock CO2 models is keeping pace with Sig Sauer and Springfield Armory’s introduction of new air pistols this year, and over the past year and a half has gone from no Glock CO2 models to four in the U.S. market. In the European market there are also CO2 models of the Glock 34 Competition (Longslide) and Glock 17 Gen5. Since the G19X was available in Europe before it was released here, that gives us some idea of what we are apt to see from Umarex and Glock in the U.S. market for 2020. But for now, for us, (U.S.) four new Glock blowback action CO2 models is an impressive start. read more


A little distressed

A little distressed

Who is influencing who?

By Dennis Adler

Today I got an email from Dan Wesson, not the ASG Dan Wesson, the CZ-USA Dan Wesson with news about a new 1911 DW model, the Wraith. The name caught my attention right away, not exactly the name you would pick for a handgun unless there was something ominous about it. Well there isn’t, except that it has a unique distressed finish, black finished barrel and sights, and distinctive grips. Sound a little familiar? A little Sig Sauer WTP like?

So this morning I got an email from CZ-USA’s media relations announcing a new Dan Wesson 1911 model called the Wraith. As you can see, it is a very clean gun devoid of extensive markings or branding and just the model name in script. The most distinguishing feature of the gun, aside from the threaded muzzle, is the distressed version of Dan Wesson’s Duty finish. I have to say, this is something different that is very eye catching and falls into that category of seldom seen new guns with an aged, worn, or distressed finish. There are a number of gunmakers out there with custom finishes, not many though, who offer a distressed look. Think Sig Sauer 1911 WTP and that’s about as close as you get in a production model. Would we like to see ASG and Dan Wesson turn this into a new blowback action CO2 model with a self-contained CO2 BB magazine? Oh yes!

Distressed finishes on centerfire guns are not that common, custom finishes yes, but not deliberately aged finishes unless you are looking at Western guns, which were the original distressed finish handguns, with 19th century-design black powder and cartridge-loading single actions being offered up by manufacturers with worn finishes to look like original old guns. Very cool stuff for Western gun enthusiasts and, as it has turned out in the last few years, for CO2 guns based on original centerfire pistols and long arms. But now, who is influencing who? read more


Springfield Armory 1911 A-1 MIL-SPEC Part 5

Springfield Armory 1911 A-1 MILSPEC Part 5

Two gun showdown and benchrest accuracy

By Dennis Adler

The Hyskore is a good pistol rest with a lot of adjustments. There are also extra rubber pads to raise the rear of the gun and a V shape rubber pad for the inside of the rest to use if you want to lay the base of the frame on top, rather than in the wedge (as pictured). It depends on the gun and how you are comfortable shooting from a rest. I have never done that well with the pistol rest and air pistols compared to just shooting off hand. Sometimes I do better if I just settle down and use a two-handed hold and Weaver stance. Today, the rest only made a small difference in overall group sizes.

While we might have expected Umarex or Swiss Arms to develop a new 1911 model to challenge Sig Sauer’s WTP, it was another relatively new company to the airgun game that rose to the occasion, Springfield Armory. In many ways this is not unexpected as neither Sig nor Springfield were in the airgun market until the last couple of years for Sig, and only just this year for Springfield since they are both manufacturers of centerfire guns; this as opposed to airgun manufacturers like Umarex, among others, collaborating with gunmakers to produce CO2 copies of their cartridge guns. Of course, Umarex being the parent company of Carl Walther puts them in the perfect position to do this with gun manufacturers like Colt, S&W, and Glock. When a gunmaker decides to make the move into the airgun marketplace, like Sig Sauer did, even establishing a separate division (SIG AIR), it becomes a more meticulous in-house effort. Much the same has occurred at Springfield Armory and the result is a series of new models that have individually raised the bar. The 1911 MIL-SPEC does that, for the most part. We now have two relatively new airgun manufactures with R&D and marketing divisions and offshore manufacturing competing for the most authentic copy of a current production 1911 model in their respective centerfire lines. We also have Umarex and Glock delivering on their promise to introduce new and better models, including the just released Glock 19X. So the race for this year’s top gun is still up for grabs! But first, the benchrest test of last year’s top ranking 1911 CO2 model, the Sig Sauer WTP, literally against “the new kid on the block.” read more