My favorite CO2 air pistol of all time Part 2

My favorite CO2 air pistol of all time Part 2

And what makes it special

By Dennis Adler

The Maschinenpistole 40 or MP40 was one of the big hits from Umarex in 2017.
The CO2 version of the full auto 9mm WWII submachine gun allows semi-auto fire as well as full auto, making it much more CO2 and BB friendly. The self-contained CO2 BB magazines use a pair of 12 gram CO2 cartridges. It doesn’t hurt accuracy, either.

When you have a veritable history of American and European firearms recreated today in .177 caliber BB and 4.5mm pellet firing airguns, everything from selective fire pistols like the Mini Uzi, Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 and WWII German MP40, to state-of-the-art semi-autos like the Glock 17 and legendary guns from the American West, like the Colt Peacemaker, finding one gun that raises the bar or hits your “must have” list, is like going to a premier firearms auction with the determination that no matter how many guns catch your eye, you are only going home with one. And so we begin Part 2 back in 2017. read more


My favorite CO2 air pistol of all time Part 1

My favorite CO2 air pistol of all time Part 1

And what makes it special

By Dennis Adler

The very first Airgun Experience was a tribute to John Wayne’s last film, The Shootist, and the limited edition Umarex Colt Peacemaker hand engraved and custom finished Shootist CO2 model. This was the beginning of an entire series of hand engraved CO2 Peacemakers in 5-1/2 and 7-1/2 inch barrel lengths that would be introduced in Airgun Experience articles.

This marks the 400th Airgun Experience article and over the period from No. 1 to No. 400 so many new CO2 air pistols and rifles have been introduced it becomes difficult to keep them all in comparative categories. The only real defining characteristics are magazine types, blowback or non-blowback actions (and that has to include revolvers), sights, though most are fixed sights of one type or another, and lastly, the quality of the build, fit, and finish. In most cases the differences between blowback and non-blowback semi autos covers all the rest, but not in every case and with today’s choices, that really doesn’t pare down the list all that much. So to start, let’s look back at new models introduced since Airgun Experience No. 1, which started with a new model. read more


Springfield Armory M1 Carbine Part 3

Springfield Armory M1 Carbine Part 3

An American Military Classic

By Dennis Adler

Troops training with the M1 Carbine had the most advanced weapon American soldiers had ever used. These are Type 1 models c.1942. Also note the soldier in the background practicing with a Colt 1911A1.

One of the true requisites for a firearm being deemed a classic design is that no matter how old it is, no matter how many firearms are regarded as superior in design or capability, it is still being manufactured to this day. Reproductions of firearms from the past are similar validations, but with the M1 Carbine, like the Colt Model 1911A1, the design is still being used and current models still manufactured. How this relates to CO2 models is much the same; today we have Colt Peacemakers, multiple versions of the Colt Model 1911, and now, the beginning of M1 CO2 models. And yes, that raises the question “are there other versions forthcoming?” Perhaps, given that there were different variations of the original M1 Carbine. read more


Springfield Armory M1 Carbine Part 2

Springfield Armory M1 Carbine Part 2

An American Military Classic

By Dennis Adler

At 4.9 pounds, Springfield was able to come within 9.6 ounces of the military M1 Carbine which weighed 5.5 pounds (as light at 5.2 pounds). Of course that is with the plastic stock CO2 model vs. hardwood on the actual M1 stocks.

Why a Springfield Armory M1 CO2 Carbine and not an M14? Considering that Springfield Armory builds the M14, that is an even better question. The answer is simply that the M1 Carbine is an historic WWII firearm, the M14 is not. One reason Springfield builds the M14 today is that it was developed at the original Springfield Armory with the legendary John Garand. The M14 is essentially a modernized select-fire M1 Garand with a detachable magazine. The M2 Carbine (with a 30-round magazine) was a select fire version of the M1 Carbine developed in 1944 and used toward the end of WWII and again in Korea and during the early years of the Vietnam War. WWII M1 models were also converted to M2 variations with a kit (“Kit, Carbine, T17”) developed at the Inland Division of GM, which built the greatest number of M1 Carbines. read more


Springfield Armory M1 Carbine Part 1

Springfield Armory M1 Carbine Part 1

An American Military Classic

By Dennis Adler

If there is one thing Springfield Armory knows how to build it is the M1 and M14 Carbine. With 45 years of practice the company has turned its skills toward a CO2 model that encompasses the key features of the WWII era M1 Carbine in a magazine fed, blowback action model.

Ask 100 people what the most famous military rifle in American history is and you will hear M16 more than any other, and from a technical point, in terms of numbers produced, model variations, years in service and the number of manufacturers, they’re probably right. Ask the same question of 100 military arms collectors and you’ll get a lot of different answers, very few of which, if any, will be the M16. The M1 Garand and M1 Carbine will be among the majority, and for good reason; the M1 Carbine served the U.S military in WWII, Korea and throughout the first years of the Vietnam War. It is a part of U.S. military history in ways that the M16 can never be. read more


Air Venturi Seneca Aspen Part 2

Air Venturi Seneca Aspen Part 2

The PCP air rifle that goes it alone

By Dennis Adler

The scope that comes with the Aspen is a fairly good optic but the gun can be outfitted with any number of sights to enhance its long range accuracy. The receiver is drilled and tapped and has a built-in 11mm rail for scope mounts.

The Air Venturi Seneca Aspen is offered in 4.5mm (.177), 5.5mm (.22), or 6.35mm (.25) caliber models. The .22 is an ideal gun to take on small game hunting trips or just as a plus one for your hunting gear. There are certain advantages to a very quiet, high velocity air rifle in the field.

The Aspen provides a number of options, the number of shots vs. number of pumps to maintain ideal psi for single or multiple rounds, as well as psi firing modes, there are two, High and Low, the latter providing more shots without pumping up the air pressure as often, but still with an average of 750 fps with .22 caliber pellets (within the set psi range). read more


Air Venturi Seneca Aspen Part 1

Air Venturi Seneca Aspen Part 1

The PCP air rifle that goes it alone

By Dennis Adler

The Air Venturi Seneca Aspen is a pretty large air rifle weighing 8 pounds but capable of 10 shots (in .177 and .22 caliber) at velocities over 900 fps. This self-contained precharged pneumatic is the first of its kind, at least in this century…

Dedicated air rifle hunters and competitive shooters know that PCP stands for Precharged Pneumatic. And that means superior velocity and accuracy for hunting small game or precision target shooting. A PCP is capable of much more than 12 gram CO2-powered air rifles or even those with larger 88 gram CO2 cylinders. A PCP also allows sustained firepower while traditional single shot break barrel spring piston, gas piston, or pump guns only allow one shot. This is a topic I have not spent any time writing about in Airgun Experience because this column is more focused on handguns than rifles, and always on guns that are self contained. Simply, precharged means you must have a source to put air (not CO2) in the rifle or pistol’s reservoir. This is traditionally done with either a compressor or a scuba tank. It can also be done, quite laboriously, with specially designed hand pumps, which is the only way to make a precharged pneumatic air rifle portable enough for use in the field away from any lightweight means of recharging the air supply. The hand pump is actually a very old solution because precharged pneumatic air rifles were developed in the late 18th century! read more