Bersa BP9cc Part 2

Bersa BP9cc Part 2 Part 1

Learning the ways of subcompact carry

By Dennis Adler

The ASG Bersa BP9cc is an ideal gun for CCW training. Though larger than most subcompacts used for concealed carry, the majority of compact 9mm handguns are the approximate size of the Bersa BP9cc. The airgun is pictured with an Elite Survival Systems ballistic nylon belt clip holster (left) a Galco Yaqui paddle holster (center) and a DeSantis Nemesis pocket holster. All three are designed for compact semi-autos of approximate size to the Bersa.

While I prefer a CO2 training gun that is 100 percent correct to its cartridge-firing counterpart, like the Umarex S&W M&P40, the ASG Bersa BP9cc hits on so many important points that the magazine design almost becomes a secondary issue. What I like most about this particular airgun is the actual pistol it is based upon, a compact 9mm semi-auto that is just a little shorter in overall length than a Glock 19. It has the same simplicity of operation and many of the same fundamental features. The Bersa BPcc models remain slightly above the entry level pricing for a 9mm (.380 and .40 S&W) pistol, as does the price for the ASG CO2 model. Since the .177 caliber pistol uses an internal striker and has the same weight and basic handling of the cartridge models it offers a great opportunity to test the waters for a centerfire model and also work on trigger control, sighting, and most importantly for a compact pistol, determining the best means of carry for the gun. Aside from the cost of holsters, under $100 gets you started with the BP9cc airgun. read more


Bersa BP9cc Part 1

Bersa BP9cc Part 1

Learning the ways of subcompact carry

By Dennis Adler

Since 1959 Bersa has been manufacturing well-built, affordable semi-auto pistols in Ramos Mejia, Argentina, and their first polymer-framed, striker-fired model, the BP9cc is available as a .177 caliber blowback action CO2 model. The ASG Bersa BP9cc has exceptional attention to detail and polished slide used on the 9mm duotone pistol.

Back in the 1980s I owned a Bersa .380 ACP semi-auto, it wasn’t a Walther PPK but it looked a lot like one and that was its biggest attraction. Bersa started out in the late 1950s building .22 caliber semi-autos and over the decades worked its way up to larger calibers. Their early guns all had a passing resemblance to either Walther or Beretta models, and not surprisingly, the company’s founders, Benso Bonadimani, Ercole Montini and Savino Caselli were Italian firearms engineers who immigrated to Argentina in the 1950s and established Bersa in the city of Ramos Mejia, the name you see on the slide of every Bersa model. Their first .22 LR semi-auto pistol was introduced in 1959. More than half a century later Bersa is an established manufacturer of well built but still affordable pistols. The company offers a complete line of .22LR, .380, 9mm and .40 S&W semi-autos (some that still look like a Walther PPK or PPK/S) and others, like the BP9cc, with a passing resemblance to a Glock. It is, however, its own unique design. BP9cc stands for Bersa Polymer 9mm Concealed Carry. Introduced in 2010, the 9mm semi-auto was the company’s first polymer-framed, striker-fired pistol, so for Bersa this is a groundbreaking design. read more