1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 1

1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 1

The Russian Version of BBs vs. Pellets

By Dennis Adler

Gletcher offers back and silver versions of the legendary Model 1895 Nagant revolver. The black .177 caliber BB version (bottom) and the current 4.5mm pellet model NGT RF in black with rifled barrel. These are authentic looking CO2 pistols that reproduce nearly all the features found on the original 1895 models. (Russian Nagant holster courtesy World War Supply)

I know, all we hear about is Russia, Russia, Russia, but I’m taking about Mother Russia, 19th century Russia and the golden age of firearms, a time when America’s captains of industry and armsmakers courted the Russian Czars and lavished them with presentation pistols. Samuel Colt was among the first with a magnificent Gustav Young engraved and gold inlaid 3rd Model Dragoon and a pair of matching 1851 Navy Model revolvers that he personally presented to Czar Nicholas I in 1853 and 1854. By the end of the 19th century, everyone from Colt to Smith & Wesson had sold arms to Russia, but in 1895 Czar Nicholas II turned to the Nagant Brothers in Belgium and purchased their newest double action revolver to rearm his military. read more

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 3

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

The Russian sharpshooter is back

By Dennis Adler

The Mosin-Nagant was the most abundant of all Russian rifles spanning more than half a century of production beginning in 1891. The Model 1944 alone exceeded 4 million and found its way into the hands of the resistance during WWII. Here the Gletcher Mosin-Nagant is paired with two other Gletcher Russian Legends models, the Nagant pellet pistol (holstered) and the TT-33 blowback action semi-auto.

The Mosin-Nagant is among a handful of legendary rifles like the Henry and Winchester lever action models, the M1 Garand, 1903 Springfield, .303 Lee-Enfield, and Mauser 98, that proved their mettle on the fields of battle and became iconic symbols, not only of nations, but of ideals. The Mosin-Nagant was a design that rose above the very history of the nation in which it was created, and played no small role in making that history. As a CO2 model it carries a remarkable heritage that spans from the era of the Czars, to the Russian Revolution, the rise of Communism, through two world wars, and into the present day, where many surviving examples of early to mid 20th century Mosin-Nagant rifles and carbines, and Mosin-Nagant design models (produced by armsmakers in other countries) are still being used. The Mosin-Nagant has had an almost unprecedented 127 years of service since 1891. So, there is a lot to be said about the Gletcher Mosin-Nagant CO2 model, most importantly that it is a worthy representative of its namesake, not perfect, but for an air rifle, quite remarkable. read more

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 2

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 2 Part 1

The Russian sharpshooter is back

By Dennis Adler

Aside from Russian soldiers, Russian Jewish partisans, men and women alike, joined in the fight against Germany. One of the most common rifles used by the resistance was the Mosin-Nagant, which had been in production for more than 50 years by WWII. The Gletcher M1944 CO2 model is shown with the sling (which comes with the rifle) attached to the stock.

The last variation of the Mosin-Nagant was the M44 carbine (Model 1944), which was adopted by the Russian army late in 1944, and this is the model after which the Gletcher Mosin-Nagant CO2 model is named. The Model 1944 was an updated Model 1938 carbine with the addition of a side folding bayonet. The Russian military still deemed this a necessary tool, especially with increased urban combat toward the end of the war. The bayonet for the M1944 was designed by the N.S. Semin and chosen over several others as it performed exceptionally well with the shorter length of the Mosin-Nagant carbine. The side folding mount for the 15.1 inch cruciform bayonet also made it an unobtrusive accessory when not needed, as well as eliminating the earlier requirement for a soldier to carry a separate detachable bayonet, as with 91/30 and earlier 1891 infantry models. read more

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 1

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 1

The Russian sharpshooter is back

By Dennis Adler

History gives us many choices in military firearms because almost every gun, at one time or another has been used by an army somewhere in the world since the 15th century. Almost every handgun and rifle has some military lineage, whether it is a flintlock, caplock, rimfire, centerfire, or CO2 model.

The Mosin-Nagant was not just a rifle but a series of rifles produced in Russia from 1891 through 1948. Many original Mosin-Nagant models are still in use today around the world. With millions having been manufactured they are readily available and affordable for military arms collectors. The Gletcher Mosin-Nagant CO2 rifle is based on the WWII era Model 1944, a variation of the M38 version with a folding bayonet.

For CO2 powered air rifles one of the oldest patterns used today is the Mosin-Nagant bolt-action rifle, which dates back to the original 1891 design by Russian Army Captain Sergei Ivaonvich Mosin, and Belgian armsmakers Emile and Leon Nagant. The hyphenated sharing of names, however, wasn’t exactly intended, in fact, back in late 19th century Russia it was never known as a Mosin-Nagant, but rather the Model 1891 or the “3-Lineyaya Vintovka obr 1891g” (3-line rifle, model of 1891). In point of fact, the bolt action rifle was almost entirely designed by Sergei Mosin. The Nagant part, however, is quite significant; Emile and Leon designed the magazine follower, the bolt, an interrupter (a specially designed part within the receiver, which helps prevent double feeding) and the charger or stripper clip that was used in the final production models. Originally these key pieces were part of the Nagant rifle design presented to the Russian military at the same time as Sergei Mosin’s in 1890. read more

The 100th Airgun Experience

The 100th Airgun Experience

What have we learned?

By Dennis Adler

History has, in a way, dictated which guns are the most significant, among them the great Webley MKVI. As a manufacturer, Webley also has a lengthy history building airguns, so their c. 1937 MKVI in .177 caliber is based on the same blueprint as the original .455 caliber military revolver.
History has, in a way, dictated which guns are the most significant, among them is the great Webley MKVI. As a manufacturer Webley also has a long history building airguns and their c. 1937 MKVI in .177 caliber is based on the same blueprint as the original .455 caliber military revolver. (Webley holster by World War Supply, belt courtesy John Bianchi)

It’s hard to believe, but here we are at No. 100. A lot of airguns have been tested in the previous 99 Airgun Experience articles. When I set out to create this series of short features, rather than following a traditional blog format, I decided to write and illustrate them as I would for a magazine. This comes from 40 years in the print media world as an author, editor and publisher; it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Hopefully, those of you who have followed the Airgun Experience throughout the last 99 articles and others who have recently started to read the columns on Pyramyd Air have come to appreciate the depth and detail in each review. The goal has always been to inform, illustrate, and educate as much as possible, not only with reviews of the airguns but their use for enhancing firearms knowledge and improving shooting skills. read more

Gletcher Model 1891 Mosin-Nagant sawed-off Rifle

The Belgian-Russian Connection

The Gletcher Model 1891 Mosin-Nagant sawed-off Rifle

By Dennis Adler

The Gletcher M1891 Mosin-Nagant sawed-off rifle or Obrez model s it was known in Russia, is a very accurate reproduction of a rare model used by various irregular forces and partisans during the 1917 October Revolution. Although altered in the field and not manufactured in this form, Obrez models were used in campaigns throughout the early 20th century.
The Gletcher M1891 Mosin-Nagant sawed-off rifle or Obrez model as it was known in Russia, is a very accurate reproduction of a rare model used by various irregular forces and partisans during the 1917 October Revolution. Although altered in the field and not manufactured in this form, Obrez models were used in campaigns throughout the early 20th century.

Sawed-off rifles and shotguns were not solely an affectation of the American West and the Prohibition Era of the 1920s and ’30s; throughout Europe rifles and shotguns with shortened barrels were common, particularly in time of war, which brings us to this unusual and rare variation of the legendary Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, the Obrez. This was a non-production version of the Model 1891 (and later Mosin-Nagant rifles) with the stocks cut off behind the wrist and barrels shortened to as little as 12 inches. None, however, were as elegantly designed as this Gletcher airgun variation based on the Model 1891 design. read more