The 10/22 Air Rifle Kit Part 3

The 10/22 Air Rifle Kit Part 3

Pushing it to 25 yards

By Dennis Adler

Normally, 25 yards is not a great distance for high-power air rifles, but for one that is running on a pair of 12 gr. CO2 cartridges it could be a push. Not that a pellet can’t travel that far, it certainly can and much further, but not accurately. What we are after here is proof that the Umarex Ruger 10/22 with its paired CO2 cartridges and the power of precision targeting with the Mantis 3-9×32 AO Mil-Dot scope can send a pellet 25 yards downrange and hit the target with consistent accuracy. With a scoped .22 LR Ruger 10/22 this would be a given, but with a CO2 version it is not. read more


The 10/22 Air Rifle Kit Part 2

The 10/22 Air Rifle Kit Part 2

Scoped and ready for the 10-meter range

By Dennis Adler

I shot the 10 meter indoor test off a benchrest. With the Mantis scope I was expecting very right groups and had the 10/22 settled into these very affordable Millett Benchmaster rests, which are great for .22s and air rifles like the Ruger 10/22.

Pellet rifles fall into a number of categories from Olympic competition to small game hunting and just plain old plinking and target shooting. The best pellet rifles are usually expensive (or comparatively expensive) precharged pneumatics (PCP), premium underlever spring air rifles, like the RWS Diana 460 Magnum, spring piston break barrels, like the Beeman R7 Elite Series, while at the lower end of the price spectrum are CO2 powered air rifles using an 88 gr. CO2 cartridge or dual 12 gr. CO2 cartridges. The Ruger 10/22 falls into the last category and with its sealed air chamber in the buttstock has enough power to send 4.5mm pellets downrange at velocities capable of being effective for small varmint hunting and practical target shooting, both of which are greatly enhanced with the use of a variable power scope like the Mantis. Pyramyd Air has picked a good match for the Ruger 10/22 in the Rifle Kit. read more


The 10/22 Air Rifle Kit Part 1

The 10/22 Air Rifle Kit Part 1

Scoped and ready for the 10-meter range

By Dennis Adler

Sometimes there are real advantages to buying a kit when it has everything you need to upgrade an air rifle, including the air rifle itself. Since Umarex didn’t introduce the Ruger 10/22 with accessories, or even include a rail to mount a scope (like Ruger does with the 10/22 rimfire model), Pyramyd Air put the package together using a UTG low profile rail mount, UTG Accushot 1-inch scope rings with large easy to use hex thumb nuts, and a well made Mantis 3-9×32 AO Mil-Dot Scope.

One of the things I regret about the time I had a Ruger 10/22, back in the late 1960s, was not fitting it with a scope. Never being much of rifleman, (I have a few but they are western lever actions), and rather more of a shotgun and handgun guy, I’ve never had too many opportunities to shoot rifles with optics, except for a handful of modern guns I have tested for gun magazines over the years. To quote Quigley Down Under, only reversing Quigley’s use of a rifle, instead of a revolver, “I said I never had much use for one. Never said I didn’t know how to use it.” So with that in mind, I am going to make up for my misgivings from years past and run a test with the new Pyramyd Air 10/22 Air Rifle Kit and see what the Ruger can do with a proper scope. Granted, I have to settle for shooting 4.5mm lead pellets at around 650 fps, rather than my old 10/22 with .22 LR rounds traveling down range at a much greater, and louder velocity, but from my perspective writing about airguns, this is a brand new experience. I could have had a 10/22 with a scope anytime in the last 50 years, but never a pellet model! read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 4

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 4

As real as it gets with a CO2 Air Rifle

By Dennis Adler

Doubling up on 10/22s, the new Ruger CO2 model is an almost perfect match for the .22 rifle.

There are a number of excellent CO2 powered air rifles on the market today that duplicate AR-based .223 Remington (5.56x45mm NATO) centerfire platforms, as well as the Sig Sauer MPX and MCX pellet-firing models, and classic military models like the Springfield Armory M1 Carbine. The new Umarex Ruger 10/22 is the only one based on an original .22 LR design, essentially the next step up after a pellet rifle for learning gun handling skills and target shooting. The symbiotic relationship between the 10/22 in .22 LR and the 10/22 CO2 in 4.5mm (.177 caliber), is the closest of any contemporary air rifle to its cartridge-loading counterpart. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 3

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 3

The 10-meter tests and an edge

By Dennis Adler

The .22 LR 10/22 uses an alloy receiver as does the CO2 model and Umarex copied it in every fine detail, including the four drilled and threaded screw holes for mounting the Weaver rail that comes with the 10/22 rimfire model.

I know you’re all wondering what the “edge” is. It is what makes the Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle a bit more authentic. The .22 LR model uses a lightweight alloy receiver, just like the CO2 model, and this is very good news because Umarex followed the exact same receiver design including the four drilled and threaded holes to mount a scope base. The 10/22 rimfire models have a Weaver-style scope adapter, and Ruger also sells them as an accessory item, which means you can purchase one and use it on the CO2 model. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 2

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 2

Measurements and velocity

By Dennis Adler

Overlooking the shorter barrel on the latest Ruger 10/22 Compact, the classic lines of the 1960’s Ruger design still come through even with modern black synthetic stocks. The new CO2 model not only captures the look but the fundamental handling, as well, making this an ideal first gun for anyone working their way up to a rimfire semi-auto rifle. The 10/22 has been that gun for over half a century.

The Ruger 10/22 is an iconic design that has been copied by others and inspired similar designs, (even in CO2 by Crosman) but as executed by Umarex, it is almost a 1:1 version of the modern Carbine with black synthetic stock. And I have to thank Ruger and Umarex for bringing the 10/22 back into my life because it really is a touchstone to my past, as I am sure it is to many of you who may have had, or still own, a Ruger 10/22. As a CO2 model it sizes up as a very authentic gun and with the internal buttstock CO2 loading design, taken from the Umarex Legends Cowboy Lever Action, the 10/22’s exterior lines are superbly duplicated. In fact, measuring the CO2 model against the current black synthetic stock Carbine model, the overall lengths are identical at 37 inches (the CO2 model is 37.1 inches), barrel lengths are 18.5 inches (external length), and weight with the synthetic stock is 5 pounds. The CO2 version tips the scale at 4.5 pounds, a difference you can feel when you pick up the air rifle and compare it to the .22 LR model. The Compact .22 caliber model Ruger sent is 2-inches shorter in overall length with the 16.12 inch barrel. There are a few other minor differences between the Compact and the Carbine including sights, but the standard Carbine in .22 LR has the same folding, windage adjustable rear and bead front sight as the 10/22 Air Rifle (in the comparison photo). read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 1

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle Part 1

Yesterday’s childhood re-imagined

By Dennis Adler

The Ruger 10/22 of my youth was an innovative .22 for the time. The 10-round, rotary magazine fed semi-auto was designed by William B. Ruger, Sr. to be on the same scale and have the same sleek lines as his famous .44 Magnum Carbine. The 10/22 was Ruger’s first .22 and for the better part of the last 50 years it has been the first rifle of young men and women who wanted to learn to target shoot and hunt. In rimfire terms, it is the Red Ryder BB gun of .22s.

I have had a lot of “first” guns, first CO2 pistol, first semi-auto pistol, first revolver, but the Ruger 10/22 was the first rifle I ever owned, well, half owned. My friend Gene and I went in on it, and it was “our first rifle.” That was during my first year of college, and the 10/22 got to be weekend escape recreation, plinking at cans and paper targets in the desert. This was the original Ruger 10/22, about three years after it was introduced in 1964, a lean, simple .22 LR semi-auto with a nice hardwood stock. read more