Schofield and 1875 Remington Part 1

Schofield and 1875 Remington Part 1

The 4.5mm pellet-firing cartridges will determine the top smoothbore six-shooter

By Dennis Adler

And so it comes down to two guns, the Bear River Schofield Texas Jack, hand engraved by Adams & Adams, and the new old gun on the block, the Crosman Remington Model 1875, both equipped with steel smoothbore barrels, and loaded with pellet-firing cartridges. Back in the day their cartridge-firing ancestors were carried by everyone from lawmen to famous outlaws and were pretty much an even match.

This is like a western where all the anticipation has been building for the big shootout at the end only there are no good guys vs. bad guys here, just two very well made CO2 powered six-shooters facing each other down to see which smoothbore single action is the most accurate when loaded with pellet-firing rounds; the Schofield or the 1875 Remington in the ultimate test, the John Wesley Hardin faro card shoot. read more

Bear River Schofield 4.5mm Pellet Shells

Bear River Schofield 4.5mm Pellet Shells

Running on lead

By Dennis Adler

The new 4.5mm pellet rounds come six to a package, so you’ll need at least three packs to fill out a cartridge belt. The Adams & Adams engraved Schofield models are shown with TrailRider Products holsters and cartridge belt.

The one thing that everyone has been waiting for from Bear River (aside from a model with a rifled barrel) is the long anticipated rear-loading pellet firing cartridges. This is one big step forward for the very popular Schofield CO2 model, which only needed fresh ammo to kick accuracy, velocity, and shooting enjoyment up a full notch. The new pellet-loading cartridges look like the pellet rounds for the Colt Peacemaker CO2 model, but they are specific to the Schofield’s cylinder design and, just like Colts and Schofields in the 1870s, are not interchangeable. Score a point for historic accuracy? I don’t know, score a point for Bear River for getting these new rounds into circulation! read more

Crosman Remington Model 1875 vs. Bear River Schofield

Crosman Remington Model 1875 vs. Bear River Schofield

BBs at 10 Paces!

By Dennis Adler

It’s BBs at 10 paces, the new Crosman Remington Model 1875 (right) which fires either BB or pellet cartridges, and the Bear River Schofield, which at present, only fires BB cartridges. Both have smoothbore barrels. The Remington has an internal barrel length of 6-3/4 inches which gives it a slight edge over the Schofield’s 6-1/2 inch internal barrel. External barrel lengths are 7-1/4 inches for the Remington and 7.0 inches for the Schofield. The tests were done using Remington’s own plated steel BBs.

To wrap up this latest series on Western Airguns, it’s time to level the last playing field, and pit the new Crosman Remington Model 1875 and Bear River Schofield CO2 revolvers against each other; the number two and number three guns from the last test each shooting .177 caliber steel BBs. Since the Remington could shoot 4.5mm lead pellets as well, it was compared against the 7-1/2 inch Umarex Colt pellet model. The Schofield came up a distant third for accuracy with only BBs to send down range, however, the Remington is a dual cartridge pistol and fires either BB or pellet loading cartridges. Using the same cartridge design (but not same cartridge) as the Umarex Colt Peacemakers, either type of Remington round loads at the back of the cartridge, and Crosman is diligent in clearly marking the rims of the two different cartridges so there is no mistake in loading. Since both the Remington and Schofield have smoothbore barrels, the test distance will be shortened to 21 feet using the same style B-27 silhouette targets as the previous Colt, vs. Schofield vs. Remington test. read more

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 3

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 3

The Shootout – Colt vs. Schofield, vs. Remington

By Dennis Adler

The three most famous handguns of the American West have finally been produced in CO2 versions. This completes a circle of legendary Western arms that begs to be tested as they were back in the day, the Colt Peacemaker vs. the Schofield, vs. the new kid on the block, the Remington Model 1875.

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 1
Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 2

Three famous American handguns from the 1870s, all with history, famous and infamous owners, and all almost perfectly reproduced as .177 caliber CO2 BB and pellet cartridge loading revolvers. Just as it was back in the days of Buffalo Bill Cody, Texas Jack and Frank James, these legendary revolvers all had advantages and failings and all of them have been faithfully copied in these CO2 models by Umarex, Bear River, and Crosman. The Umarex Colt Peacemaker has a solid advantage with its rifled barrel. The Schofield and 1875 Remington both have smoothbore barrels, but can shoot 4.5mm lead pellets as well as .177 caliber steel BBs with different cartridges. All three have comparable barrel lengths (externally) and come relatively close with their internal barrel lengths, 6.75 inches for the Peacemaker (measured from the front of the cylinder to the recessed 4.5mm muzzle), 6-1/2 inches for the Schofield, and 6-3/4 inches for the 1875 Remington. read more

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 2

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 2

The Three Horsemen – Colt, S&W and Remington Compared

By Dennis Adler

The trio of western guns we have all been waiting for, the Umarex 7-1/2 inch Colt Peacemaker (rear, in the deluxe engraved Adams & Adams edition), the Schofield (center also in deluxe engraved Adams & Adams edition) and brand new Crosman Remington Model 1875.

Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 1
Crosman Remington Model 1875 Part 3
Colt built more Peacemakers between 1873 and 1879 than all the Remington Model 1875, 1888, and 1890 Single Actions combined. Even the S&W Schofield and all of the Model No. 3 Americans, Russians, and New Model No. 3 Single Actions produced from 1872 to 1912 take a far backseat to the Peacemaker for production. However, it was the 1875 Remington that maintained the company’s presence in the large caliber single action revolver market throughout the 1870s and 1880s. It seems only just that of the three CO2 powered Western revolvers available today that the 1875 Remington should be among them. Even coming in third in the Old West, when there were many choices and not too much money to be spent on a pistol, says something about the prestige of carrying a Remington. It was tough to beat Colt’s “Old Reliable” when deciding on the purchase of a new gun. You can say the same thing today of the Peacemaker, Schofield and Model 1875 Remington, when choosing among these three excellent CO2 BB and pellet cartridge-firing revolvers. read more

The 100th Airgun Experience

The 100th Airgun Experience

What have we learned?

By Dennis Adler

History has, in a way, dictated which guns are the most significant, among them the great Webley MKVI. As a manufacturer, Webley also has a lengthy history building airguns, so their c. 1937 MKVI in .177 caliber is based on the same blueprint as the original .455 caliber military revolver.
History has, in a way, dictated which guns are the most significant, among them is the great Webley MKVI. As a manufacturer Webley also has a long history building airguns and their c. 1937 MKVI in .177 caliber is based on the same blueprint as the original .455 caliber military revolver. (Webley holster by World War Supply, belt courtesy John Bianchi)

It’s hard to believe, but here we are at No. 100. A lot of airguns have been tested in the previous 99 Airgun Experience articles. When I set out to create this series of short features, rather than following a traditional blog format, I decided to write and illustrate them as I would for a magazine. This comes from 40 years in the print media world as an author, editor and publisher; it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Hopefully, those of you who have followed the Airgun Experience throughout the last 99 articles and others who have recently started to read the columns on Pyramyd Air have come to appreciate the depth and detail in each review. The goal has always been to inform, illustrate, and educate as much as possible, not only with reviews of the airguns but their use for enhancing firearms knowledge and improving shooting skills. read more

Colt Peacemaker vs. Schofield

.177 caliber Colt Peacemaker vs. Schofield Topbreak Revolver

Two Gun Lawman Part 2

Historically, double gun rigs were less common, they did exist, and there are photographs to document it, including images of Wild Bill Hickok. The period correct holsters worn by the author with the Umarex Colt Peacemaker and Bear River Schofield are of the California Pattern design on a narrow 2-inch cartridge belt.
Double gun rigs were less common but period photographs document them, including images of Wild Bill Hickok. The period correct holsters worn by the author with the Umarex Colt Peacemaker and Bear River Schofield are a California Pattern design on a 2-inch cartridge belt.

By creating limited edition, hand engraved models of the Colt Peacemaker and Schofield, a grand tradition in American arms making is being preserved. For the 7-1/2 inch hand engraved Peacemaker Adams & Adams have used the same L.D. Nimschke pattern as the 5-1/2 inch model, only on an all nickel gun. To do hand engraving on an alloy framed pistol, achieve the depth and detail of the original 19th century hand engraved models by Nimschke, Helfricht, and others takes a skilled hand. This is a softer metal than cartridge guns which are hardened steel. Recreating the L.D. Nimschke designs on the Umarex Colt Peacemakers is no different than working on a .45 Colt Single Action. The end result still combines the flowing scrollwork, foliate designs, and punch dot backgrounds necessary to cover the frame and topstrap, barrel, ejector housing, triggerguard and backstrap. Colt engraving varies by the percentage of coverage and barrel length for the most part, and must also incorporate engraving to surround the Colt’s patent dates on the left side of the frame and the Rampant Colt emblem at the rear. read more