Umarex 850 M2 part 9

Umarex 850 M2 part 9

Into the field – paper, tin cans and varmints beware

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex 850 M2 has shown potential as a small game or pest gun that is quiet, fast handling and with theright pellet, can deliver 10 foot pounds of energy (FPE), which is effective on small game. Of course, you have to be working in fairly close for an very accurate shot, and 25 yards (75 feet) seems to be where the 850 M2 lives for consistent sub-1-inch groups. A pellet will travel much further, of course, but as distance increases accuracy decreases. I can definitely put a .22 caliber pellet from the 850 M2 on the target from 50 yards, but I can’t necessarily say where it will hit with the same accuracy. The trajectory of .22 pellets fired from the 850 M2 can actually be witnessed through the scope and the bowed trajectory can become predictable if you have the opportunity for consecutive shots as I did at 25 yards with the H&N Sport hollow points, and they gave me consistent 1-inch or smaller groups from a rested position with the Axeon scope. read more

Umarex 850 M2 part 8

Umarex 850 M2 part 8

Into the field – paper, tin cans and varmints beware

By Dennis Adler

Today it is time to begin wrapping up my series on the Umarex 850 M2 with a test of different pellets at maximumeffective range. With the .22 caliber model you have the option to send some pretty heavy lead pellets downrange and fitted with the Axeon 4-16×44 scope keep your shots sufficiently accurate to take small game and certainly kick tin cans and print tight groups on paper.

I have found the Umarex 850 M2 can be a little difficult sometimes. The forestock is hard to remove (at least for me) whenever you need to load CO2, and there is an occasional loss of CO2 pressure from the 2×12 gr. adapter while shooting, but it doesn’t happen with any regularity. It could be the adapter but it also happened once with an 88 gr. CO2 cartridge, velocity just drops off like you are out of CO2, which, in fact, you are. The seating of the CO2 in the receiver is very precise; there is even a special warning sheet with the gun pertaining to this. In general though, when everything works, the 850 M2 is a surprisingly well balanced, fast handling, and accurate .22 caliber CO2 bolt action rifle suitable for both target shooting and small game hunting. For this latest series of tests I am shooting five different types of pellets from two different manufacturers looking for the perfect combination of accuracy and performance.

Recap from previous tests

My earlier tests used H&N Sport .22 caliber lead pellets; the 13.73 gr. Sport wadcutters, 21.14 gr. Baracuda Match round nose pellets, and 18.62 gr. Baracuda Hunter Extreme hollow points recommended for small game hunting. My original comparisons were rated for both velocity and muzzle energy at 72 degrees. Here is the recap: The Sport clocked an average velocity of 555 fps which generates 9 ft. lbs. of energy (13 joules for those in Europe). The highest velocity with the Sport pellets was 566 fps, which increases energy to 10 ft. lbs. and 13 joules. Standard deviation for eight shots was 7 fps. read more

Best entry-level CO2 pocket pistol Part 2

Best entry-level CO2 pocket pistol Part 2

Another “Tale of the Tape”

By Dennis Adler

This is an interesting comparison for me because I have actually done this with the centerfire guns, so I have a somewhat unique perspective on how the PPS and P365 compare as personal defense handguns, and how well their CO2 counterparts can fill in as very affordable understudies for handling and CCW practice. In Combat Handguns we call this head-to-head type of comparison “The Tale of the Tape” and I am going to write this up in much the same way so that the guns speak for themselves and the best choice is clearly evident, though in CH articles I have had a couple of coin tosses over the years. You might want to have some pocket change ready. read more

Best entry-level CO2 pocket pistol Part 1

Best entry-level CO2 pocket pistol Part 1

It’s not the one you think it is

By Dennis Adler

Pocket pistols are not as big a deal with airgun enthusiasts as they are with folks who carry a handgun for personal protection, even though the first blowback action CO2 pistol, the Walther PPK/S, was regarded as a pocket pistol. To be fair, the pocket pistol label has never really belonged to the PPK/S but rather the c. 1930 PPK, which is a smaller pistol. That’s splitting hairs these days because the PPK is larger than many contemporary pocket pistols, some of which are in larger calibers, too. read more

Early blowback action designs

Early blowback action designs

Umarex already had an eye on the future

By Dennis Adler

In the world of blowback action CO2 models we tend to look back at 2014 as a watershed year when Umarex introduced the Colt licensed 1911 Commander, what was then, and even to this day one of the best 1911 CO2 models. There were, however, a handful of other blowback action models that preceded the Commander by at least a year and from other manufacturers, (and here we are referencing models with self-contained CO2 BB magazines only). Blowback action models began with the Umarex and the Walther PPK/S some 20 years ago, and though the period from 2000 to 2014 is not memorable for noteworthy blowback action air pistols, looking back to 2010 Umarex actually introduced a few that have been overlooked by many, some because they were only available for a very short time. They nevertheless represent benchmarks in blowback action pistol evolution.   read more

Revisiting the Peacemakers Part 3

Revisiting the Peacemakers Part 3

Taking a page from Colt’s history

By Dennis Adler

Most respectable cow towns out west had a gunsmith and even a gun shop, with a case or two displaying new and used revolvers, and a wall rack with rifles and shotguns. There’s even an apocryphal story that author and historian Joseph G. Rosa told in his book The Gunfighter Man or Myth? about a writer for the New Mexico Democrat who observed a young cowboy deciding on the purchase of a new revolver in 1884. The gun shop’s proprietor reached into a display case and retrieved a handsomely mounted .45 caliber revolver and said, “How do you like this? It is the newest thing out – a double action forty-five.” The cowpoke looked at the Colt Model 1878 and turned up his nose, “Ain’t worth a row of beans. No man ‘cept a tenderfoot wants that kind of thing. Give me an old reliable all the time. Ye see a man that’s used to the old style is apt to get fooled – not pull her off in time – and then he’ll be laid out colder’n a wedge.” He did have a point. read more

Revisiting the Peacemakers Part 2

Revisiting the Peacemakers Part 2

What Sam Colt learned about manufacturing the 1851 Navy

By Dennis Adler

This is one of those lessons in history that explains why, that even in what appears to be the best of times, all of your planning means very little if no one comprehends why you are doing it. This is the lesson Samuel Colt learned in the 1850s. How this relates to what is happening with Colt Peacemaker air pistols might seem a bit ambiguous, but as you read you will understand that what Colt learned in the past is relevant to what is about to happen in the present.

Sam Colt’s Experiences

In terms of celebrated Colt revolvers, the 1851 Navy is only surpassed by the 1873 Peacemaker as one of the most legendary guns of the American West. It was the perfect revolver in size, caliber (.36 caliber), weight, balance and handling. The U.S. Ordnance Department would select Colt’s 1851 Navy as the nation’s first standard issue sidearm for the Army and Navy in 1855, cementing the model’s role in American history, but in 1851, when it was still new and impressively innovative, Sam Colt – barely on his feet with his new company in Hartford, Connecticut – made a bold decision. During the first full year of manufacture, Colt displayed the 1851 Navy, along with other Colt models, 1849 Pocket Model and large .44 caliber Dragoons, at the London Exposition held in June. The 1851 London Exposition by its sheer size and scope is regarded as the first World’s Fair. read more