Umarex Beretta PX4 semi-auto air pistol

Umarex Beretta PX4 semi-auto air pistol 

A storm on the horizon

By Dennis Adler 

The Umarex Beretta PX4 Storm is a visual match to the 9mm and .40 S&W cartridge guns and an excellent airgun for training in the handling and basic operation of the PX4 Storm.
The Umarex Beretta PX4 Storm airgun is a visual match to the 9mm and .40 S&W cartridge guns and an excellent training substitute for learning handling and operation.

Not every air pistol is a copy of a cartridge-firing handgun, but blowback action airguns have assumed that role. They are by design intended to serve several purposes, only one of which is training (or remedial training) with a duplicate to a cartridge-firing handgun. Another is simply to learn safe gun handling without the expense of purchasing a cartridge-firing handgun, which many airgun owners never do. And last, and perhaps most import, they are simply a lot of fun to shoot because they do more than just send a BB or pellet downrange. Part of the attraction to blowback action airguns is their greater sense of realism and for many airgun enthusiasts that is the “E-Ticket” ride, to coin an old expression. The Umarex Beretta PX4 Storm is a perfect example. read more

Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 Part 2

Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712

“The Gun that Stunned the West”

Part 2 – Testing the Umarex Model 712

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Mauser 712 version, while lacking the lustrous blued finish of an original, has hit all of the key operating features, particularly for the Model 712, arguably the most desirable of any Mauser Broomhandle model because of its selective fire mechanism.
The Umarex Mauser Model 712 version, while lacking the lustrous blued finish of an original, has hit all of the key operating features from the original 1932 model, arguably the most desirable of any Mauser Broomhandle because of its selective fire mechanism and interchangeable box magazine.

The original Broomhandle Mauser (actually referred to by Mauser as the Pistole 7.73 until the Model 1930 and Model 712 were introduced), was a well-balanced gun with its center of gravity forward of the trigger to reduce muzzle jump. Recoil was more linear with the mass of the bolt slamming back over the hammer, and delivering its energy into the grip. As with all Broomhandle models the sharp recoil also drove the edges of the metal frame between the grips into the web of the shooter’s hand, which fortunately is not a problem with the Umarex airgun. read more

Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712

Umarex Broomhandle Mauser Model 712

“The Gun that Stunned the West”

Part 1 – A Little Mauser History

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Legends Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 is one of the most accurate to the original airguns ever produced.
The Umarex Legends Broomhandle Mauser Model 712 is one of the most accurate to the original airguns ever produced.

There once was a Sheriff from Anadarko, and no, that’s not the beginning of a limerick, but it is the beginning of a change in handguns that swept across what remained of the American West at the turn of the century. By 1900, a slow but continual shift from traditional revolvers to semiautomatic handguns was taking place. The first successful American made semi-auto pistols were manufactured by Colt and designed by John M. Browning. He had also patented a semi-auto design for Fabrique Nationale in Belgium which became the 7.65mm (.32 ACP) Model 1899-FN and improved Model 1900-FN. The later version is historically noted as being among the handguns carried by Cheyenne, Wyoming, Deputy Sheriff Richard Proctor, who arrested Tom Horn for murder in 1902. It was, however, the German influence that made one of the most stunning contributions to the change from revolvers to semiautomatics, not only by lawmen and outlaws, but the U.S. government as well. read more

CP99

Walther CP99 

The original skill set trainer 16 years later

By Dennis Adler

Still one of the best 9mm semi-autos in the world, the Walther P99 (left) was introduced to the U.S. market in 1995 and purchased by a number of U.S. law enforcement agencies. Five years later Walther introduced the CO2 version, CP99. It was used as a training gun for German police. After 16 years the CP99 remains one of the most popular of all Walther pellet guns.
Still one of the best 9mm semi-autos in the world, the Walther P99 (left) was introduced to the U.S. market in 1995 and purchased by a number of U.S. law enforcement agencies. Five years later Walther introduced the CP99 CO2 version. It was used as a training gun for German police. After 16 years the CP99 remains one of the most popular of all Walther pellet guns.

Back in 2000 Umarex unveiled an innovative air pistol design, the Walther CP99 pellet gun. There was nothing new about pellet guns, or Walther airguns, but this airgun had a mission, it was as physically close in detail and basic handling as the 9mm Walther P99 being used by German police departments, as well as state and local law enforcement agencies in the U.S. (or the Smith & Wesson built version, the S&W 99 manufactured from 2000 to 2004). read more

Umarex HK MP5 K

Umarex HK MP5 K

Your Very Own Personal PDW

By Dennis Adler

Umarex started with .22 LR versions of the famous HK MP5, and using similar metal and polymer construction has built the MP5 K PDW in .177 caliber. The airgun has the folding stock and full operating features like the original.
Umarex started with .22 LR versions of the famous HK MP5, and using similar metal and polymer construction has built the MP5 K-PDW in .177 caliber. The airgun has a folding stock (something you can’t have with the .22 caliber MP5 models) and full operating features like the 9mm model.

This is a story that begins with a bang, the sound of a .22 caliber rifle being fired. Over the past seven years the popularity of .22 LR copies of famous military handguns and rifles has grown exponentially as new models have become available, and there are more and more each year, mainly through the ingenious designers and manufactures at Umarex and their licensed reproductions of legendary arms like the Uzi Pistol and Carbine, the HK MP5, Colt AR-15 (and later variations), the HK 416 and Colt 1911 Government Model. It comes as no surprise then that Umarex has also done the same with .177 caliber models in recent years including the famous HK MP5 K-PDW (Personal Defense Weapon). read more

Umarex Walther P.38

Umarex Walther P.38

Recreating one of the most influential semi-auto handgun designs of the 20th Century

By Dennis Adler 

As authentic as possible, the Umarex Walther P.38 is a near visual match for the real vintage pre-WWII model at top right!
As authentic as possible, the Umarex Walther P.38 is a near visual match for the real vintage pre-WWII model at top left! (WWII P.38 holsters courtesy World War Supply)

I have to admit a certain prejudice for this Umarex model because I collect Walther P.38 pistols, and when I first saw this .177 caliber version a few years ago it immediately went to the top of my must have list. If you have any interest in legendary German handgun designs or the evolution of handguns in the 20th Century, it should go to the top of your airgun list as well. Here’s why. read more

Umarex Beretta Model 92A1

Umarex + Beretta + 92A1 = Perfection

The latest Beretta Model 92 airgun sets a new standard

By Dennis Adler

The Umarex Beretta Model 92A1 is as close to the 9mm version as an airgun can get. It even fits most exisitng 92A1 holsters. (Galco Combat Master shown)
The Umarex Beretta Model 92A1 is as close to the 9mm version as an airgun can get. It even fits most exisitng 92A1 holsters. (Galco Combat Master shown)

For as long as I have been writing about airguns there has always been a top drawer Umarex Beretta Model 92. Some 15 years ago, when I co-authored the 1st Edition Blue Book of Airguns with Dr. Robert Beeman, one of the airguns on the cover was the new Umarex Beretta Model 92FS pellet gun, a visually striking copy of the military’s standard issue sidearm (adopted in 1985 to replace the Colt Model 1911A1). But it was a traditional multiple-shot pellet gun under the skin, and internally it functioned more like a revolver using an 8-shot cast alloy rotary pellet magazine inserted into the breech by pressing the slide release and allowing the front half of the barrel and slide to move forward so the rotary magazine could be inserted. The CO2 was loaded into the left side of the grip frame (by pressing the magazine release which pushed the left grip panel out to be removed), and exposing the CO2 loading channel underneath. It was and remains to this day a very slick air pistol that has the look, feel and weight of a 9mm Beretta 92FS. It is also a very accurate 10 meter pellet gun. However, what Umarex has achieved in the 15 years since the 92FS pellet gun was introduced is nothing short of remarkable, and the latest (2015) Umarex Beretta Model 92A1 blowback action BB gun sets a new standard. read more