M17 Reboot Part 4

M17 Reboot Part 4

Sig Sauer Reflex Sight at 10 yards

By Dennis Adler

The outdoor shoot at 10 yards went well except for fairly steady crosswinds. Even so, and hitting a little off the mark, the M17 ASP and Sig Sauer reflex sight combo put shots close within the A-Zone of an IPSC silhouette target.

This is the practical accuracy range for the M17 ASP fitted with the Sig Sauer M17/M18 Low Profile Reflex Sight. As shown in the earlier installments the sight is easy to mount to the M17 slide and once attached and sighted in the gun becomes a far more accurate pellet pistol. My initial tests (sighting in and targets) were done at 21 feet (7 yards) and now I am going outdoors to do a complete range test from holster draw to shooting a 10-round string at 10 yards (30 feet).  The added 9 feet of distance should not make much difference for the M17 ASP in terms of velocity; the rapid shooting at 1-second intervals will likely have some affect on velocity but not significantly for 10 shots. read more


M17 Reboot Part 3

M17 Reboot Part 3

Down to business with the Sig Sauer Reflex Sight

By Dennis Adler

It’s a whole new gun when you add the Sig Sauer Low Profile Reflex Sight to the M17 ASP. It goes from a combat pistol to something closer to a target pistol.

The Sig Sauer P320/M17 ASP was not a tack driver during any of its previous range tests, but it was good enough for its intended purpose as a fixed sight military handgun for close quarter to medium range use. Yes, the 9mm M17/M18 models are far more accurate than the 4.5mm CO2 model which is intended as a training gun and for general sport shooting. The M17 ASP is a darn good gun as designed and can keep groups tight at 10 meters, but it’s no target pistol. But can it be, now that the airgun is equipped with a dedicated Sig Sauer design Low Profile Reflex Sight mounted to the slide? read more


M17 Reboot Part 2

M17 Reboot Part 2

Un-boxing and mounting the Sig Sauer Reflex Sight

By Dennis Adler

As none of you have this yet, we are going to share this airgun experience step-by-step. So think of this installment on the M17 Reboot as a still frame video. With the new M17/M18 Low Profile Reflex Sight in hand (the mention of the M18 unfortunately does not hint at a forthcoming M18 CO2 model but rather that this sight comes with a mounting base for the M18 Air Soft model as well), I am going to un-box and follow the directions to install the Sig reflex sight on an M17 ASP.

It’s a box full of little wonders from Sig Air. Included are the Low Profile Reflex Sight with dust cover (shown on the sight), two mounting plates, tools, instruction manual and a lens cloth. The only extra tool needed is a small Phillips head screwdriver.

What comes in the box? read more


M17 Reboot Part 1

M17 Reboot Part 1

Sig Sauer ups its game with optics

By Dennis Adler

The Sig Sauer P320/M17 ASP is the CO2 pistol that broke the barrier between BB and pellet pistols with the first self-contained CO2 pellet magazine. It is not a perfect design in overall operation, but it is a 1:1 gun for exterior appearance and basic handling. And as Sig Sauer’s Sig Air Division intended, it is an ideal training substitute for its 9mm counterpart. It is also the first CO2 pellet model to employ in its original design a removable optics plate. And that is where we left the M17 almost a year ago waiting for the next step. That time has come.

Sig Sauer is starting from a position of strength with the P320/M17 ASP, because it is still the only blowback action CO2 pellet pistol on the market with a self-contained CO2 pellet magazine, and it is also the only CO2 version of the exact pistol being carried today as the new standard issue U.S. military sidearm. To be fair, there are other handguns in use by U.S. military with CO2 counterparts, and the Marine Corps are opting for Sig’s compact M18 version, (which is not yet offered as a CO2 model, only Air Soft), but the majority of U.S. service branches are already carrying or will be carrying the M17. This is not news and the CO2 version has already proven itself, walking away with 2018’s Replica Air Pistol of the Year title. Even so, Sig Air knew there was still work to be done on the M17 ASP and has not rested on its laurels. This announcement is late but the option that the P320/M17 ASP needed most, the slide optics mount and red dot sight are finally here, and here is where we begin, with a look back at the CO2 model and where this new feature will take it. read more


Barra 009 Part 005

Barra 009 Part 005

Full Auto Operation

By Dennis Adler

Right now, if you are into blowback action CO2 BB pistols, this is the hot ticket for 2020. The Barra 009 is everything you found desirable about the Gen4 Glock 17 plus the option to fire on full auto at the flip of a switch. This is what makes CO2 airguns exciting to shoot.

This is the part of every select-fire CO2 air pistol test that we wait for because this is an experience you can generally only get with an airgun. I have fired full auto centerfire rifles and they can be a handful, same for pistols, but most reports on the Glock 18 say that recoil is not that hard to manage on full auto compared to other select-fire pistols. Certainly with the Barra 009 recoil will not be an issue no matter how nice the rapid action of the slide feels and the low dB report sounds. It is a mere fraction of what the real gun would be like. And that is actually a good thing, as very few of us will ever need to train for full auto firing with a handgun or rifle. It is an occasional privilege for those of us who write about firearms so our opinions are grounded in fact. The fact is, at the moment, the Barra 009 is in a class by itself as the most compact (compared to the Beretta 92A1/M9A3 or Mauser M712) CO2 full auto handgun on the market. And a gun in a class of its own deserves a good explanation. read more


Barra 009 Part 004

Barra 009 Part 004

Semi-auto accuracy at 21 feet

By Dennis Adler

Today we further explore the comparisons between the Umarex Glock 17 Gen4 and Barra 009 by shooting the 009 as a semiautomatic pistol. In part 003 were found that the velocity of the Barra is almost identical with the Gen4, the 009 delivering a littler more velocity on the high end and closer to the 325 fps figures quoted by the manufacturer but only by a few fps. Average velocity between the Gen4 and 009 is the same, 317 fps, and both guns have a modest 2 fps standard deviation for an entire magazine; overall, very comparable guns with the same parts. No corners cut by Barra. read more


Barra 009 Part 003

Barra 009 Part 003

A Glock is a Glock…

By Dennis Adler

There’s an old joke about Glocks that has been repeated far too many times (and now applies to far more guns than the original G17), that a Glock looks like the box it came in. Well, at least the Barra 009 comes in a box.

Whether the name on the slide is Glock, or another manufacturer (there are at least two U.S. companies that produce handguns that look like a Glock), the shape is pretty much the same. And there are guns that resemble Glocks; the point being that building a gun that looks like a Glock is not uncommon, however, building a gun that performs as well as a Glock, well that is a different story. In our particular case it is more than likely that the Barra 009 will perform (in single action mode) exactly the same as the Umarex Glock 17 Gen4 because they share essentially the same internal components. read more