Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical

Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical Part 1

The Swiss Equation

By Dennis Adler

With the exception of the slide contour and forward serrations, the .177 caliber Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical is a dead ringer for the .45 ACP Sig Sauer TacOps and Sig Sauer 1911 XO models.

With the exception of slide contour and forward serrations, the .177 caliber Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical is a match for the .45 ACP Sig Sauer TacOps and Sig Sauer 1911 XO models.

Sig has been marching to the beat of its own drummer for over 150 years building guns that are distinctively Sig in nature. In modern times Sig first earned its reputation with the famous P210, introduced back in 1947. Despite its historic heritage and distinctive designs, in 2004 the revered Swiss armsmaker came to terms with what almost every gun manufacturer in the world acknowledged as the most significant handgun of the 20th Century, the Colt Model 1911. Sig Sauer began building its own versions of the standard Colt Government Model. (This was followed by a Carry model with 4.0 inch barrel introduced in 2007, a Compact variation, and in 2011, an Ultra Compact with 3.3 inch barrel. In addition Sig Sauer offered two 1911 Tactical Rail Guns, the TacOps, and 1911 XO.

The .177 caliber Sig Sauer Tactical (far right) is based on the .45 ACP Sig Sauer 1911 XO (far left) and TacOpcs model (center). Note the accurate frame design with flat mainspring housing, palm swell grip safety, upswept beavertail and Delta-style skeletonized hammer.

The .177 caliber Sig Sauer Tactical (far right) is based on the .45 ACP Sig Sauer 1911 XO (far left) and TacOps model (center). Note the accurate frame design with flat mainspring housing, palmswell grip safety, upswept beavertail and Delta-style skeletonized hammer.

The Government-sized Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical Operations model is a full feature Rail Gun with an SAO (single action only) trigger, low profile night sights, ambidextrous thumb safety, and Ergo XT grips, and, like any semiautomatic pistol bearing the Sig Sauer name, a distinctive look with a skeletonized hammer and trigger, squared contoured slide reminiscent of Sig’s P-Series pistols, deep slide serrations, and extended beavertail and palmswell grip safety, all set off by a matte black slide and alloy frame. The alloy frame is where the .177 caliber Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical Model begins.

There isn’t a single view, except looking down the .177 caliber recessed smoothbore barrel, that isn’t totally accurate to a Model 1911 Rail Gun.

There isn’t a single view, except looking down the .177 caliber recessed smoothbore barrel, that isn’t totally accurate to a Model 1911 Rail Gun.

 What makes a Rail Gun special?

In 2012 the Colt Model 1911 Rail Gun proved it still has the chops by being selected as the Marine Corps new CQBP (Close Quarter Battle Pistol) for elite USMC special operations units. The Marine Corps version, or M45, is a specialized Rail Gun based on the Colt XSE Series Rail Gun, a full-sized Government Model with integral Mil Spec Picatinny dustcover accessory rail suitable for large tactical lights and light/laser combinations. Accessory rails are an integral part of any 1911 built specifically for tactical use by military and law enforcement, (or personal defense use with light/laser accessories). Today, 1911 Rail Guns are available from a number of manufacturers, including Colt and Sig Sauer.

The .177 caliber pistol has nearly exact exterior dimensions, comes in at 10 ounces lighter than the Sig 1911 TacOps, at 33 ounces (empty).

The .177 caliber pistol has nearly exact exterior dimensions, comes in at 10 ounces lighter than the Sig 1911 TacOps, at 33 ounces (empty).

Railing with air

The Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical airgun has one of the most authentic designs of any 1911-style CO2 powered, blowback action semi-auto made. Although the airgun’s slide configuration is not exactly the same as the Sig’s, more like a Colt Model 1911 Rail Gun, the frame is identical to the Sig with its squared sides, integrated dustcover rail and finely checkered frontstrap. The design of the .177 caliber 1911 Tactical is a combination of the .45 ACP Sig Sauer TacOps, Sig Sauer 1911 XO, and Colt CQBP Rail Guns.

The .177 caliber pistol has nearly exact exterior dimensions, comes in at 10 ounces lighter than the Sig 1911 TacOps, at 33 ounces (empty), and features full wraparound diamond checkered rubber tactical (Tac Master) grips. The wraparound design actually covers the correct checkered frontstrap.

The ambidextrous thumb safeties are easy to work. Also note the vertically serrated alloy trigger shoe and over travel adjustment screw.

The ambidextrous thumb safeties are easy to work. Also note the vertically serrated alloy trigger shoe and over travel adjustment screw.

Features unique to the airgun and based on the Sig Sauer 1911 TacOps model include a Delta-style serrated hammer, skeletonized target trigger with vertically serrated shoe and over travel adjustment, palmswell grip safety with upswept beavertail, vertically grooved flat mainspring housing, and dovetailed front and rear white dot combat sights.

The air pistol uses the same style low profile white dot sights and ambidextrous thumb safeties as the cartridge-firing models, although the white dots are not tritium night sights.

The air pistol uses the same style low profile white dot sights and ambidextrous thumb safeties as the cartridge-firing models, although the white dots are not tritium night sights.

The Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical uses a drop free, 18-round self contained CO2 and BB magazine which adds to the gun’s authentic operation and handling. With a recessed .177 caliber, 4.25 inch smoothbore barrel and .45 ACP muzzle, this is about as close in appearances to the real Sig as you can get with a blowback action air pistol.

Using a 4.25 inch smoothbore barrel, (0.75 inches shorter than the .45 ACP models) the .177 caliber version of the Sig Sauer 1911 TacOps uses 18-shot, drop free self contained CO2 and BB magazines.

Using a 4.25 inch smoothbore barrel, (0.75 inches shorter than the .45 ACP models) the .177 caliber version uses 18-shot, drop free self contained CO2 and BB magazines.

In Part 2 the Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical goes to the target range.

A word about safety

Blowback action airguns provide the look, feel and operation of their cartridge-firing counterparts and this is one reason why they have become so popular. Airguns in general all look like guns, blowback action models more so, and it is important to remember that the vast majority of people can’t tell an airgun from a cartridge gun. Never brandish an airgun in public. Always, and I can never stress this enough, always treat an airgun as you would a cartridge gun. The same manual of operation and safety should always apply.

14 thoughts on “Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical

  1. Looking forward to the shooting test. I really like my Umarex Colt Commander, so will be interested in seeing how this pistol compares as far as accuracy and build quality.
    Thank you
    Harvey


    • If the Colt Commander had theambi safety it would be perfect. Personally , I see no need for a rail , and absolutely despise rubber wrap around grips . See no need for the larger mag floor plate . I like a more standard looking45, but for the tactical crowd, it will be an appealing 1911


      • The tactical look (as well as modern military look), are desirable features today but a lot of old school Colt 1911 fans don’t care for the Rail Gun design, and that is why they are special models. Another reason is they don’t fit any 1911 holsters and if you have a lot of them, as I do, the rail is a non starter, unless you want to begin breaking in a new rig. For LEOs and military though, it was, and remains the next logical step, and in step with the current trend in semi-autos with integral rails.


  2. Dennis,

    Like Harvey above, I too own the Umarex Colt Commander and like it a lot. My only regret about the Colt Commander is the lack of the dustcover accessory rail. I too would like to see you report on a side-by-side shooting comparison of the Commander and the SIG. I have one question about the SIG. Either I just didn’t see it, or you didn’t say if the grip safety is functional on the SIG. Is the grip safety functional?


  3. I hope the airgun industry avoids the pitfall of too many variations of an existing firearm . I for one would like variations that at presently aren’t offered like a true 4 1/4 inch barrel Commander, blowback version of the Colt Defender for starters .



      • Wouldn’t we all. Till then we’ll just have to be happy with the Tanfoglio Custom and Gold Custom models for extreme accuracy. I would actually rather see a Gold Cup than a 4-1/4 inch Commander. One other thought about the Sig Sauer 1911 Rail Gun. You have to follow the market and the increasing number of traditional cartridge firing models that are coming out with Rail Gun versions. For the purposes of training, it is necessary to have airguns that match their cartridge firing counterparts. More models, yes, but not for the sake of adding models but rather for the purpose of making airguns viable training aids for civilians,and law enforcement. As for rubber wraparound grips, it’s a matter of choice. I’m not too fond of them either, but on the very positive side, I think with very little adjustment to the screw mounting holes in Crimson Trace 1911 laser grips, (same wraparound fit) they could be mounted to the Sig Sauer 1911 airgun grip frame. That would be a worthwhile addition to the Sig CO2 model for home defense training.


        • I think a lot of the ” tactical ” stuff is more for wannabes than truly necessary. I have found no daytime shooting scenarios that need a rail gun . At night a 38 revolver or a semiauto with a flashlight held away from my face works for me .Technology can break when needed the most. Marksmanship and tactics carry the day, and night


          • Tactical models are yes, perhaps a little trendy, which is no surprise; civilians always like what military and law enforcement uses. That said, I personally believe that for home defense a Rail Gun offers a marked advantage over a semi-auto and hand held flashlight. Under the duress of a home invasion, having both hands on the gun is a solid plus, and one of the reasons why so many manufactures offer Rail Guns. In a recent publication on sale now titled “America’s Handgun Model 1911” in which I have written a short history of the 1911, there is a section on 20 new for 2016 Model 1911s. Of that total, seven are equipped with dustcover rails. The majority of new and older 1911s remain traditional in design. However, there is a solid foundation for Rail Guns in use by Spec Ops, SWAT, and others, as well as the advantages they offer for civilian home defense use. As for technology failing, yep, it can and does. Technology can’t replace a well-trained marksmen.


        • I see Pyramid is listing a two tone version with standard grips . Would be nice if they offered optional parts I have 2 Commanders , couldn’t resist a second that Walmart had a 50 percent off sale . A Remington and an Umarex WW2 version. As a lefty pistol shooter would like to add ambi safeties as I have on my 45s.


  4. For those who go the tactical route these will make nice understies. Iam set in my ways and since a flashlight held in a reverse grip under a handgun works for me I will stick with it .Can leave it in that position or move it around to not provide a flashpoint that will draw fire to my head and chest. If I were on an entry team or in a combat situation I might change my thinking but not at this stage. Nice review, looking forward to the shooting stage.


    • A lot of us are set in their ways, and that’s training that stays with you. Others change with new or different techniques, but the old standard also still works. For entry teams, police, where a Rail Gun with tactical light is carried daily, and of course, Spec Ops use, this is more state of the art thinking with Rail Guns. If the practice were not sound the Marine Corps would not have adopted the CQBP in 2012 for its elite Special Operations units. The use of a flashlight that is held offset to the body certainly makes good sense as opposed to one mounted under the gun and in line with your own center body mass, but for law enforcement, they are likely wearing vests. In a home protection situation, I am still more inclined to go with a more stable two-handed hold than trying to rest the strong hand over the support arm holding the flashlight. Of course, that works for adding stability, too. I’m reminded of the 1865 gunfight Wild Bill Hickok had with Dave Tutt in Springfield, Missouri. At a distance of about 225 feet, Tutt drew and fired at Hickok. He missed. Wild Bill rested his 1851 Navy over his left arm and shot Tutt through the heart, dropping him where he stood. Kind of hard to argue with that.


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