Sig Sauer P250 ASP

Sig Sauer P250 ASP

Built for training and ready for the 10 meter target range

By Dennis Adler

The Sig Sauer P250 ASP is also a DAO (double action only) design and is offered in two finishes, all black or two tone with an OD green frame and black slide.

The P250 ASP is a DAO design and is offered in two finishes, all black or with an OD green frame and black slide.The blowback action pellet gun uses a reversible rotary 8+8 capacity magazine.

Introduced in 2008, the original DAO, cartridge-firing Sig Sauer P250 was specifically designed to address the future needs of the military, law enforcement, and civilian shooters around the world. Offered in 9mm, .40S&W and .45ACP, the P250’s innovative construction pioneered Sig Sauer’s current series of modular designs that enable users to interchange the frame, barrel and magazine for three different platforms; subcompact, compact, and full size, by moving the fire control housing from one frame to another. This also allows a change in caliber from 9mm to .40S&W or .45 ACP all with the same serialized fire control housing (technically “the gun”). This model formed the basis for the new Sig Sauer P250 ASP (Advanced Sport Pellet) blowback action pellet gun, which is a near one-to-one match to the full size P250 model, and designed to provide hands-on experience with a comparably styled handgun. This is more so in terms of trigger pull, sighting, and operating the magazine release, than in the overall operation of a cartridge-firing P250 model.

Sig Sauer brought its ASP series to market full born with a complete line of accessories including their own 12 gram Elite Performance CO2 cylinders, Sig .177 caliber Match Ballistic 5.25 gr. alloy pellets.

Sig Sauer brought its ASP series to market with a complete line of accessories including their own 12 gram Elite Performance CO2 cylinders and Sig .177 caliber Match Ballistic 5.25 gr.alloy pellets.

The Sig Sauer P250 ASP is also a DAO (double action only) design and is offered in two finishes, all black or two tone with an OD green frame and black slide. The 4.5mm pellet gun uses a reversible dual 8-round magazine (for a total of 16 shots in one magazine). When Sig Sauer says “comparably styled handgun” the P250 ASP has the weight, balance, trigger design, sights, and general operation of the cartridge-firing models; the only things missing are a few semi-auto operating features.

The ASP is 8.0 inches in length, slightly taller at 5.75 inches (top of the rear sight to the base of the magazine well), and 1.4 inches in width.

The ASP is 8.0 inches in length, slightly taller than the P250 at 5.75 inches (top of the rear sight to the base of the magazine well), and an identical 1.4 inches in width. 

Measuring up

In comparative size the overall length of a 9mm model is 8.0 inches, height 5.5 inches and width 1.4 inches. The ASP is 8.0 inches in length, slightly taller at 5.75 inches (top of the rear sight to the base of the magazine well), and 1.4 inches in width. The P250 averages 29.4 ounces; the ASP pellet gun weighs in just slightly lighter at 25.5 ounces. Double action trigger pull on a 9mm averages 6.5 pounds and the ASP 6.35 pounds, once again making it excellent for training exercises. The P250 ASP pellet gun is, of course, a little different in operation.

the CO2, which goes into a separate chamber accessed by removing the one-piece floorplate and backstrap. The screw to tighten and seat the CO2 cartridge is built into the base of the CO2 chamber.

The CO2 goes into a separate chamber accessed by removing the one-piece floorplate and backstrap. The screw to tighten and seat the CO2 cartridge is built into the base of the CO2 chamber.

The ASP has two separate systems, first a reversible 8+8 rotary pellet magazine, which means internally the airgun functions more like a revolver with the magazine rotating around the chamber, but it also has a blowback action slide that re-cocks the hammer after each shot is fired, just like a cartridge-firing P250. The second is the CO2, which goes into a separate chamber accessed by removing the one-piece floorplate and backstrap. The screw to tighten and seat the CO2 cartridge is built into the base of the CO2 chamber. The drawback here is that the use of a full-size Sig Sauer magazine containing the CO2 and pellets is not possible, (this doesn’t exist by the way; that combination is only available for BB firing models like the Sig Sauer P226 X-Five). As a result, you cannot practice reloading or tactical reloads with the pellet gun.

Two other noteworthy issues I have with the P250 pellet gun are that the slide is not designed to lock back after the last round has been fired, (although it will manually stay back resting on the top edge of the hammer). The second is the slide release lever, which while accurate in size and design, is non-functional. Other features are also just cosmetic; the ejection port, for example, is only a molded-in outline on the slide.

The P250 ASP fits most P250 holsters including this Galco Quick Slide belt holster.

The P250 ASP fits most P250 holsters including this Galco Quick Slide belt holster.

On the plus side, and important for training, the magazine release and thumb safety do operate identically to the cartridge model, and the frame has the same integral Picatinny rail for mounting tactical lights and lasers. Overall, it is an excellent platform for learning the basic handling of a P250, and being a pellet gun with a 5-inch rifled steel barrel, it can also achieve higher velocities and greater accuracy than blowback action, smoothbore BB guns. Another plus for the ASP is the use of white dot sights similar to those on the cartridge-firing P250, which makes targeting easier and again adds to the learning experience. The P250 (and P226) ASP blowback action air pistols are designed and engineered for that purpose, as well as the fun of sport shooting with pellet guns.

For firearms training or just more accurate airgun shooting, the P250 ASP Picatinny rail is long enough to fit most tactical lights and lasers. (Fox Fury AWL-P Amphibious Weapon Light shown)

For training, or just more accurate airgun shooting, the integral Picatinny rail on the P250 ASP is long enough to fit most tactical lights and lasers. (Fox Fury AWL-P Amphibious Weapon Light shown)

Built to perform

The ASP models are built to exacting performance standards and the design was put through rigorous testing before being approved to bear the Sig Sauer name. The polymer and alloy P250 (and P226) ASP designs were “life-tested” with 15,000 shots to ensure that professionals who train with these airguns experience exceptional performance and true hands-on operation. In that respect I would have to agree with Sig Sauer, this is a true hands-on gun for learning the operation of the P250. Having tested the 9mm versions in the past I can vouch for the feel of this gun in the hand, the trigger pull and sighting characteristics. Would I like a slide that locks back and the commensurate need for a working slide release, absolutely, and that may come some day as technology improves, but in comparison to earlier makes of pellet gun doppelgangers (like the Beretta 92FS and Walther P99), the Sig is one quantum leap ahead with its blowback action and magazine loading, albeit a rotary stick magazine. The ASP also fits a number of production holsters made for the P250, so even learning carry, drawing, and re-holstering procedures are possible with the airgun. That’s a lot of “hands-on” for well under $100.

The P250 ASP is perfect for drawing and reholstering practice.

The P250 ASP is perfect for drawing and reholstering practice.

Sig Sauer P250 style white dot sights make the ASP faster to get on target.

Sig Sauer P250 style white dot sights make the ASP faster to get on target.

Lead downrange

As a 10 meter pellet gun the ASP is satisfying to shoot. Average velocity with lightweight 5.25 gr. Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy wadcutter pellets was 458 fps and even without the recoil and sound of a 9mm pistol going off, the ASP is very close to the real gun in feel, sighting, and trigger pull. Fired offhand at 10 meters, my best 8-round groups averaged 1.5 inches, with a best five rounds at 0.95 inches in the X.

Blowback action slide gives the P250 ASP a more realistic feel.

Blowback action slide gives the P250 ASP a more realistic feel.

Sig Sauer summed up the P250 ASP by stating, “The popular self-defense, centerfire P250 is mirrored in ASP from full blowback metal slide to steel rifled barrel with a few built-in performance advantages – low audible profile, practice space versatility and radically less expensive ammunition. With the P250 ASP you can train until a quick, accurate response is second nature.” The gun speaks for itself.

Fired offhand from 10 meters the best five round measured 0.95 inches in the X.

Fired offhand from 10 meters the best five rounds measured 0.95 inches in the X.

11 thoughts on “Sig Sauer P250 ASP


  1. Savannah

    Yes the P250 is a nice training gun and a good shooter at 10 meters. I personally like the P226 ASP version a bit more as it has additional features closer to the real Sig Sauer P226 9mm. The two airgun designs are really quite different (P250 ASP and P226 ASP) and at the price owning both would make nice additions to your collection.

    Dennis Adler


  2. Well, I ordered the Sig 250 and out of 58 air guns in my collection, it’s the only one I sent back. I was disappointed in the lack of features which I take the blame for. I knew ahead of time there was no locking slide and no last shot hold open. But the deal-breaker, and what I didn’t realize, was that this pistol has an impossibly horrible trigger. The pull was at least 8 pounds, and off the scale. Terrible. My accuracy in shooting, or lack thereof, is always primarily tied to the trigger. At 20 feet I can create dime sized groups with my Tanfoglio Gold, which has the best trigger of any pistol I have. I never even fired this one. I have several of the other pistols you have reviewed and always agree with your conclusions. My 327 S&W is wonderful, ditto my Dan Wesson 6″ and 8″. Wonderful guns. My latest is the nickel Schofield. My, my, what a lovely gun. Love the Colt and the Swiss Arm 357s too. But I’m now afraid to get the new Sig 1911. Sig has me on the run, away from their products.


    • Like I had said earlier, the P226 ASP is a better gun and if you don’t have that one, I’d give it a try in place of the P250 ASP, which is a less expensive airgun. If you are not “absolute” on having a pellet firing Sig Sauer, I would get the P226 X-Five over either of the 8-shot rotary magazine pellet models. The 226 X-Five is one of the best blowback action models around. If you want the pellet version then go with the P226 ASP.


  3. I’ve recently purchased the 226 ASP. Have you done testing with other brands of pellets to determine the ones that yield the best results? Your results with the 250 ASP and the Sig Ballistic Pellets look nice. I’ve been reading that the 226 ASP shoots low and to the left for a lot of people, but I have a feeling it’s due to the ammunition its being fed. Any thoughts?


    • It has been awhile since I tested the P226 ASP but I don’t recall any sighting issues. But I have a tendency to pull left with some handguns, (I’m right handed and left eye dominant), overall I think the guns are pretty close to POA at 10 meters. As for favorite pellets, I did like the Sig alloy pellets but my personal favorite remains Meisterkugeln Professional Line 7.0 gr. lead wadcutters.


  4. I’m confused here, the article says this is a Double Action Only trigger, but multiple vids on YouTube show the hammer locking back after each shot, and the trigger is back in the photos here too.

    So which is it, does the P250 hammer cock back when the slide is pulled to the rear or fired, or does the trigger return to the full pull position after each shot, which would be a real bummer and sales killer if some moron at Sig made it like that.


    • Glenn

      Since you sent two comments, I will answer both here. Normally, I don’t give rude comments the dignity of an answer but since you managed to ask a valid question while insulting me, I will explain about the P250. It is based on the centerfire model but is not an exact copy. It is by design a double action only semi-auto. That definition needs no further explanation, DAO. You pull the trigger and the hammer (or a striker on a striker-fired gun) is forced back by the action of pulling the trigger. Some guns have exposed hammer spurs but they are not intended to be manually cocked. With a DAO trigger system the trigger returns to its forward position after each shot. Even if you managed to cock the hammer, the trigger remains in DA condition, otherwise the gun would be a DA/SA. The P250 ASP is a DAO design but yes, as an airgun the hammer can be manually cocked but again the trigger remains a double action pull. This is intentional not a mistake made by morons. In training with the P250 ASP the idea is to have the same trigger press experience as the cartridge firing models. There is no point at which the trigger stays back if you manually cock the hammer. The trigger press remains the same. When the slide comes back it does indeed cock the hammer but again, the trigger pull is still DAO. Now, as to why there is no video. I don’t have videos in Airgun Experience. I think the photos pretty well explain the gun’s operation. If the hammer is confusing that is on Sig but the function is correct. The P250 is a DAO. As for being silly, occasionally, old, yes but with age comes experience and you need to look at more of my blogs if you don’t like my hair in this one. And bufont is spelled bouffant. If you are going to insult someone at least spell it correctly.


      • I must admit, I was confused by this, too. I’ve never even conceived of a system that cocks the hammer, but still users a DAO trigger. It makes sense now that you explain it, but it was very confusing for me. I’m really new to airguns (loving this blog BTW), but fairly experienced with cartridge guns.



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