Diana model 5V pellet pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 5V pistol
Diana model 5V pellet pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • 5 screws
  • Gun fell apart!
  • The solution!
  • Case-hardened parts
  • Stoning is out!
  • Back to the pistol
  • Testing the trigger
  • Job done

This one will be a quickie. You will remember that I wanted to remove the grip from my Diana 5V pellet pistol to see if I could do anything to reduce the trigger pull that was over 12 pounds. Well I did, and in less time than it will take me to write this short report, I discovered and corrected the problem.

5 screws

The grip is held to the action by 4 screws. They sit two to a side. The fifth screw is a wood screw that holds the base of the triggerguard to the grip. The front of the triggerguard is hooked over a pin in the action. If you don’t remove this screw first, the grip won’t come off the action.

read more


Collecting airguns: What is collecting? 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Scarcity Part 1
Condition Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Collect anything
  • Old airguns
  • Constant upgrade
  • New collectible airguns
  • A long story
  • Collecting as an investment
  • The eclectic collector
  • The accidental collector
  • Desirability
  • Finally — an attempt to define collecting

Part 2 of this report got over 125 comments on the first day it was posted. I would say this is perhaps the most popular series I have ever written.

Reader Toto@F52, who goes by the name of Dan, inspired this report. He wondered what makes a collectible. And a lot of other readers asked the same thing. Many readers want this definition before they read anything further about collecting. I think they believe that once we all agree on the definition, then the rest of it will make more sense. But that’s just it — we will never agree on a definition! I hope to illustrate a little of the reason why today.

read more


Gletcher Stechkin APS BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gletcher Stetckin APS BB pistol
Gletcher’s Stechkin blowback BB pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy BBs
  • Correction to the hold
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • What gives?
  • Last group
  • Summary

This will be an interesting report. I had something astounding happen in this accuracy test, so let’s begin! Today we are looking at the accuracy of the Gletcher Stechkin APS BB pistol.

The test

I shot from a seated position at 5 meters from the target, using a UTG Monopod as a hand rest. Each group was produced by 10 BBs. I shot the pistol in the single-action mode for every shot.

Daisy BBs

I consider Daisy Premium Grade BBs to be a standard among premium BBs. They are no better than other BBs, but I have confidence that they are uniform and usually perform reliably.

read more


Gamo Swarm Maxxim: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo Swarm Maxim
Gamo Swarm Maxxim repeating breakbarrel air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The scope
  • Pellet length?
  • Accuracy
  • What went right?
  • What remains?
  • Targets

Today I start testing the accuracy of the Gamo Swarm Maxxim multi-shot rifle. I decided to go straight to 25 yards, as that is the distance at which they say their scope is parallax adjusted.

The scope

The scope comes with the mount installed and all you need to do is attach it to the rifle. I found it very quick and easy to mount.

Gamo Maxxim scope base
The scope is installed in the rings when you get it, and the mount just has to be clamped on the rifle. Easy! The stop pin (right) slips into a hole on the Swarm base.

You absolutely cannot see the repeating mechanism in the scope. The image is clear. However, with a dot sight mounted at the same height the mechanism is clearly visible.

read more


Umarex Forge combo: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Forge
Umarex Forge.

This report covers:

  • Different
  • Ballbearing detent
  • Power
  • Stock
  • Size
  • Picatinny rail
  • Scope included
  • Open sights
  • Trigger
  • TNT
  • Synthetics
  • Where is it made?
  • Many good things

Today we begin looking at an air rifle I have been waiting to review since first seeing it at this year’s SHOT Show. Every SHOT Show has dramatic new products that all writers scramble to review. Then there are the quiet new products that don’t seem to attract as much attention. But some things I am always looking for fall into this quiet group, and the Forge from Umarex is one such gun.

Different

The Forge is a different breakbarrel. For starters, although it develops an advertised 1,250 f.p.s. with lead-free pellets, it’s relatively easy to cock! Of course I will measure the effort in Part 2, but I’m estimating something around the specified 30 lbs. For a gas piston, that is remarkable! Easy cocking is one thing I am always looking for.

read more


Diana model 5V pellet pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 5V pistol
Diana model 5V pellet pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • What is dieseling?
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Observations

Today we look at the power of my old Diana model 5V air pistol. I expected to see results in the same class as the BSF S20 and Webley Hurricane, but perhaps a little slower because of the age of this airgun. I reckoned somewhere in the high 300s, at least.

RWS Hobbys

The first pellet I tested was the RWS Hobby, which is often the standard for velocity in an airgun. In the 5V Hobbys averaged 397 f.p.s., which I think is a pretty healthy result. The low was 387 and the high was 408 f.p.s., so the spread was 21 f.p.s. At the average velocity, this pellet produced 2.45 foot pounds of energy. I will add the Hobby fit the bore pretty tight.

read more


Collecting airguns: Condition 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Numismatics
  • Coin grades
  • Back to guns
  • 1894 Swedish Mauser
  • Is refinishing bad?
  • Cleaned coins
  • Three types of collectors
  • Different finishes equal different wear patterns
  • Last story
  • Summary

Today’s subject is one of the big ones in collecting. However, it must be understood in light of the intentions of the collector. Are you collecting because you enjoy airguns? Are you collecting as an investment? Or are you collecting to make money? The answer to these three questions can sometimes drive the issue of condition.

Numismatics

I will start with coin collecting and then transition to firearms and airguns. There are thousands of times more coin collectors around the world than airgun collectors. And, in the world of collecting coins, condition is one of the most fundamental issues. Let’s get specific.

read more