Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Crosman Premier Lights
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Crosman 100 multi pump and I had to get out the trime! If you have been reading the blog for more than half a year, you know what that means. If not, you will.

The test

The test was at 10 meters indoors with the rifle resting on a sandbag rest. I shot 5-shot groups today because the 100 is a multi pump. I pumped 4 times for every shot. I said in the last report I was going to pump 5 times per shot, but after examining the velocity figures I felt 4 pumps were enough. Because I only shot 5-shot groups, I tried 4 different pellets, and when you see the results you’ll be glad that I did! Five shots are a fair indicator of accuracy. They are not as conclusive as 10 shots, but in a pinch they will do. read more


The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Disassembly
  • Cleaning
  • Lubrication and assembly
  • Velocity — RWS Hobby pellets
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Crosman Premier Light
  • Discussion
  • What comes next?

Today is a big day. I cleaned the Tune in a Tube (TIAT) grease out of the Beeman P1 we are testing and lubricated it with plain white lithium grease. This will tell us whether TIAT is wrong for an air pistol like the P1 and also whether the pistol I’m testing is still in good shape.

Disassembly

I had the pistol apart and ready to clean in 15 minutes. The directions I gave you in Part 4 work perfectly. I’m not showing any pictures of that today because Part 4 nailed it.

Cleaning

I will say this, TIAT is very sticky stuff! It took longer to clean than I anticipated. Everything had to be wiped dry. That stuff really clings! All I did was wipe it all away with paper towels so the gun was dry and ready for the new grease. read more


Precharged pneumatics, regulators and power adjusters: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

    • Mac’s gun
    • Difference between the Talon and Talon SS
    • Long barrel
    • Air flow is the key
    • The Condor
    • The Freimarked rifle
    • NRA airgun range
    • However…
    • For RidgeRunner
    • Michael

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    It seems like you readers are hot for more information on tuning valves and adjusting power on precharged pneumatics (PCP). Very well. In response to something RidgeRunner said yesterday, I will do Part 2 of this report today.

    Mac’s gun

    It began many years ago with my friend, Earl MacDonald — Mac. He was of the opinion, shared by many airgunners, that a high-velocity .177 caliber pellet will be most accurate at long range because it will drop less over distance. So, he wanted the mostest-fastest .177 ever made. He talked to AirForce, where I worked at the time, and convinced them to let me build him a super-fast .177 Talon from blemished parts. In those days production was smaller than today and we didn’t have as many blemished parts around. Still I managed to find the parts I needed to assemble the gun. read more


Precharged pneumatics, regulators and power adjusters: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

    • Two things
    • What is an air regulator and what does it do?
    • How does the valve behave?
    • So — why have regulators?
    • Result
    • Why you need a chronograph
    • What I have not yet addressed

    Today’s blog was a gift from reader Michael, with several others joining the discussion. Here’s what Michael said last Thursday.

    B.B.,
    I’m not a future TexanSS owner, but I enjoy reading about any model of AirForce air gun. I have considered buying a TalonSS ever since AirForce came out with them, and I’ll keep thinking about one until I someday break down and get one.

    They are accurate, lightweight, cool looking, etc., but to me the greatest appeal is AirForce’s wide ranging power adjustment. To me that is huge. Want to increase shots-per-fill for target practice? Dial it down. Want to rid your side yard of that pesky squirrel but you have a .25 Condor? Dial it down to squirrel power. read more


Crosman 102 multi-pump pneumatic repeater: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 102
Crosman’s 102 is a .22 caliber multi-pump repeater.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Why?
  • The rifle
  • How smooth?
  • Sights
  • Cocking

Merry Christmas, everybody!

Here’s a special Christmas present for several readers — the start of my report on Crosman’s 102 multi-pump repeater.

History

The .22 caliber 102 repeater is derived from the 101, which was originally just called the Crosman Pneumatic. The numbers came much later. The 102 was made from 1929 to 1950, at which time all model 100 variants were terminated.

Crosman 102 receiver detail
The receiver doesn’t give the model number.

The gun I’m testing for you is the one I bought at the Texas airgun show, but received earlier this month. This one has the hard-rubber “clickless” forearm that was only available on this model in 1938 and 1939, according to the Blue Book of Airguns. The rubber has hardened and cracked with age and any benefit from the softer compound was lost decades ago. read more


Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How much was it?
  • How I know it holds
  • The tests
  • Test 1 — Crosman Premier lights
  • Test 2
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellet
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Trigger pull
  • Power adjustability
  • Loading is hard
  • Summary

How much was it?

Before I jump into today’s report, which is on the velocity of the Crosman 100, I want to make a comment on the price. I paid $150 for this one. It has just been refinished and the powerplant was overhauled — I think. Even if it wasn’t overhauled, it holds air for months (I’ll explain how I know that), so it’s the same thing.

Remember how rare I said these are? I see one for every hundred 101s (the .22 caliber version) at airgun shows. A nice 101 will run about $125-150, so I don’t think it’s too much to pay for the far rarer .177 version. Sure you will stumble into fantastic deals from time to time, but on any given day at a good airgun show, this is about what one of these will cost. They cost that much in the late 1990s, so the price isn’t being driven by inflation. read more


AirForce TexanSS big bore air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TexanSS
TexanSS big bore air rifle from AirForce.

This report covers:

  • Background
  • Texan
  • TexanSS
  • Adjustability
  • The valve
  • Aftermarket striker springs
  • Infinite adjustments
  • Trigger
  • Reservoir
  • Documentation
  • Summary

Today’s report should get a rise out of you! We are starting our look at the TexanSS from AirForce Airguns. It’s a .45 caliber big bore air rifle with sound suppression (that’s what the SS stands for).

Background

At the SHOT Show I get to listen to hundreds of airgunners and airgun dealers from all around the U.S., and when it comes to big bores here is what they all want — a shorter rifle that’s suppressed, lightweight, runs on 3,000 psi and is extremely powerful. I listen but seldom mention that some of their requests contradict one another.That should come out in this report. read more