Hatsan Bullmaster PCP: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan Bullmaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Comments
  • New Bug Buster
  • Power
  • H&N Baracuda 5.50mm head
  • H&N Sniper Light 5.50mm head
  • H&N Field Target Trophy with 5.53mm head
  • Shot count
  • Trigger
  • Sound
  • Summary
  • Next

Comments

I’ll start today’s report by listing some of the comments you readers made to Part 1. Several of you don’t care for the Hatsan BullMaster’s looks. That’s why I show a picture of the gun at the top of each report. You have to be satisfied with the appearance if you’re going to buy an airgun this expensive.

Next, several of you commented on the weight. At more than 10 pounds before the scope is mounted, this is not a lightweight airgun. Bullpups are small, but not necessarily light.

Then there is the size, itself. For a bullpup, the Bullmaster is on the large side. The overall length of just under 31 inches is very short compared to a conventional air rifle, but for a bullpup it’s on the long side. That length does give you a fully shrouded barrel that’s just under 20 inches, and you need the barrel length for power, but the point of a bullpup is its compact size.

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Hatsan BullMaster PCP: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan BullMaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

This report covers:

  • Like the Sortie
  • Comparisons?
  • Companies change over time
  • Description
  • Fill
  • Pressure gauge
  • Magazines
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • So much more to tell
  • Next

Today I start my review of the Hatsan BullMaster precharged pneumatic air rifle. This is a repeating semiautomatic air rifle in bullpup configuration. It is available in both .177 and .22 calibers and the published energies, 21/31 foot-pounds, respectively, are right where they should be for a handy hunting air rifle. I am testing the .22, but since it was sent directly from Hatsan, I won’t publish the serial number. Your chances of getting this particular airgun are slim.

Like the Sortie

I tested the Sortie semiautomatic air pistol for you in a 5-part review back in September and October, and I did it intentionally. I had this BullMaster at that time, and since the actions of the two airguns are so similar, I wanted to start with the smaller one first. Testing the Sortie got me ready for the BullMaster.

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Hatsan Hercules QE .45 caliber big bore air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Hercules 45
Hatsan Hercules QE .45 caliber big bore rifle.

This report covers:

  • Big gun!
  • Description
  • .45 bullets and “pellets”
  • 1000 cc reservoir capacity
  • Onboard air gauge
  • 250 bar fill
  • Adjustable stock
  • Adjustable trigger
  • Barrel
  • Sights
  • I shot the Hercules
  • Sound
  • Evaluation

Big gun!

I’m starting a report on the Hatsan Hercules QE .45 big bore air rifle. First let me observe that this rifle is BIG. And I mean big in all ways. It’s 48.4 inches long and weighs 13 pounds before a scope is attached. I was surprised by that number, so I put it on a balance beam scale, and the rifle I am testing came to exactly 13 lbs.

The Hercules rifles come in the following calibers: .22, .25, .30, .357 and .45. Some of the specifications like magazine capacity differ by caliber (the .22 magazine holds 14 pellets), but the length and weight remain the same throughout the range.

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Getting started with a precharged air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Fill options
  • Practicality
  • Filling a big bore
  • Tank size
  • Filling a smallbore PCP
  • The point
  • Air compressors
  • Booster compressors
  • Stand-alone compressors
  • The future

I said in the last report that I would write this report on filling options for PCPs. I’m writing this for the new guys who aren’t sure which way to turn. Any way you go represents an investment, so this is something that needs to be given a lot of consideration. Hopefully this report will start a discussion of that.

Fill options

There are two basic ways to fill a precharged airgun. Either the air is introduced from a container where it is stored until called for or else it is put in and compressed as the fill is made. The first option is based on an air tank of some kind. The second is either a hand pump or a small air compressor that connects to the airgun. I will talk about both of these but first I want to discuss practicality.

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The Defender super carbon fiber tank carrier

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

tank in carrier
Defender carbon fiber tank carrier.

This report covers:

  • 2017 Texas airgun show
  • Why a carrier?
  • I can make it myself
  • Fabric carrier
  • Who makes it?
  • What about those saddlebags?
  • Pockets — pockets and more pockets!
  • Center of balance
  • Will Pyramyd Air carry it?
  • The cost?

Today is not about an airgun or a shooting technique. Today I’m writing about a carrier for the 98 cubic foot carbon fiber air tank I recently bought from Pyramyd Air. That tank is one of the handiest pieces of equipment I own. At the Texas airgun show it filled three Benjamin Wildfires all day long and still had over 3,400 psi when I brought it home! It’s as important to me as the spotting scope I bought from Meopta last year. I wrote 4 reports about that scope, but I think I will only write this one about the carrier. It’s neat, but you will get the idea really quickly.

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Do pressure vessels become unsafe over time?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Do pressure vessels become unsafe over time?
  • Operating pressure
  • Water leading to rust
  • Oxygen!
  • Danger through work-hardening
  • Last word

Today we have a safety issue to examine. Here is the question I got last week that spawned this report.

“Wasn’t sure how to reach you so using this venue. Was wondering about safety issue on pcps with regard to repeated pressurization over the years.Most pcps are newer and certainly built with margin of safety, but is it possible as these age and perhaps are handed down that they (the pressure vessel) can become unsafe? Read somewhere repeated pressurization can lead to eventual metal fatigue (in relation to high pressure vessels of non air rifle type). Thinking of future owners down the road. Thanks for all you do for all us airgun fans, read blog everyday.”

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Firearm pellet adaptor: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • On a dare
  • The adaptor
  • Priming
  • Is it dangerous?
  • Loading the pellet
  • Discharge sound
  • Cost
  • Legality
  • Conclusions

I love it when I’m wrong! I try to be correct in my reporting, but sometimes I hit the wall and splatter all over the place. Today might be the start of one such time. I am reporting on an adaptor I bought to shoot pellets in a .223 Remington centerfire rifle, using the power of number 209 shotgun primers.

On a dare

My late wife, Edith, used to keep me straight by periodically challenging me. Whenever I said something that didn’t sound quite right, she invited me to put my money where my mouth iwa. She learned very quickly that I knew what I was talking about in the field of guns most of the time, but every once in awhile I was off the track. She learned to spot those times and she would call me on them.

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