Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • How to test?
  • Test 1. A single-stack forced feed BB gun
  • Daisy BBs in the Daisy 25
  • Dust Devils in the Daisy 25
  • Power in the Daisy 25
  • Test 2. Gravity feed with a magnetic breech
  • Daisy BBs in the Red Ryder
  • Dust Devils in the Red Ryder
  • Power in the Red Ryder
  • Test 3. A CO2 gun with cartridges
  • Daisy BBs in the SAA/li>
  • Dust Devils in the SAA
  • Power in the SAA
  • Velocity comparison
  • Feeding
  • What’s next?

Today I begin testing the new Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs that you read about in Part 1. To say the interest is high is an understatement.

How to test?

How do you test something that’s so new that there isn’t much precedent? I decided on the following. In Part 1 we learned that the Dust Devils weigh about 4.35 grains, so they will go faster than conventional steel BBs that weigh about 5.1 grains. I thought that was the place to start, but with a twist.
Instead of just doing a velocity test, I thought I would select three different kinds of BB feed systems and also see how well Dust Devils feed in each of them. There are more than three types of BB feeding systems, so we won’t cover everything today, however, once we see how the Dust Devils compare to standard steel BBs we may not have to test their velocity any further in the future. We will see as this test unfolds.

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Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box.
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

This report covers:

  • BBs rebound
  • Smart Shot
  • Weight
  • Composition
  • Accuracy?
  • Hard Target?
  • Do they work?
  • Acid test!
  • Application
  • What they will and won’t do
  • Long-term test
  • Summary

Today we are going to look at something entirely new — the Air Venturi Dust Devil BB. It’s a BB that can be fired at hard targets with little fear of rebound, because the BB disintegrates on impact. I have been playing with these for several months now, and they do deliver on that promise!

BBs rebound

Ask anyone who shoots BBs and they will tell you — BBs rebound from hard targets. They can come back at the shooter almost as fast as they went downrange. You may recall that little Ralphie Parker discovered that when he fired the first shot from his Red Ryder in the movie, A Christmas Story. Well, he wasn’t the only one! Little BB Pelletier busted his lower lip when a BB fired from an Anics revolver rebounded from 10 meters away. That BB left the pistol twice as fast as Ralphie’s — 500 f.p.s.! I shouldn’t have shot it into a steel bullet trap to begin with, but do as I say — not as I do. I said, “Aww — it’ll never come all the way back here.” Right! Reminds me of guys who shoot .22 long rifle ammo at golf balls and get surprised in exactly the same way.

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Niche market advancement

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Benjamin Discovery
  • Crosman
  • The $100 PCP
  • The bottom line
  • The legal silencer from AirForce
  • Air Venturi
  • Lloyd Sikes
  • This blog!
  • We are waiting for:

Reader William Schooley mentioned today’s topic in a comment last week. We were talking about how many airguns needed to be sold for a company to take a customer’s recommendation seriously. Here is what he said.

“I may be way over my head on this, but isn’t this just the type of situation which creates niche markets and micromarketing? It seems to me that where a small but specific group wants a product that’s not being addressed by other larger firms, smaller more specialized companies will develop products to fill the niche. What is your historical take on niche or micromarketing in the air gun community?”

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Determining the age of a vintage airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How old?
  • It starts with straight razors
  • Shape of the blade
  • Shape of the scales
  • Blade profile
  • Airguns
  • Generations/ages
  • Very old steel and wood
  • Seals
  • Spring guns
  • Funky parts
  • Other finishes
  • Post WW II steel and wood guns
  • Breech and piston seals
  • Look for plastic
  • Painted guns?
  • Summary

How old?

If you are new to the field of airguns there seems to be an ocean of things you need to know. If you want to become a collector, some of these things are crucial. Today I will explore how you can determine the relative age of a vintage airgun.

It starts with straight razors

Don’t worry, I’m not going to talk about straight razors very long. But they were the thing I used to rediscover what it feels like to be a new guy in an established hobby. Although I am not interested in collecting them, I couldn’t help but pick up some clues to their relative ages (when they were made) along the way.

Shape of the blade

Before around 1800, straight razors had no real tang. That’s the skinny part behind the blade where you hold the razor to shave. Razors from 1800 and earlier simply don’t have one. They just end the sharp blade and remain almost as wide but become dull as they go back to the pivot pin on the scales.

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The Diana 27: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
My .22 caliber Diana 27 is actually a Hy Score 807.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Eye report
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Some questions arise
  • RWS Superpoints
  • The artillery hold
  • Summary
  • MP40
  • Second time was the trick

Before I begin, someone asked about Rich Shar. He’s the guy who smoothes the biggest spring guns like the big Gamos and Hatsans. Rich tells me he has not been working on guns for awhile, but he does have a project in the works. He promises to tell me more about it. Now, on to today’s report.

I have decided to take my Diana 27 apart and clean out the old grease, then relubricate it with Almagard 3752 grease, to see what difference it might make. But not today. Today will be a traditional Part 3 accuracy test.

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Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

MP40
Umarex Legends MP40 BB submachinegun.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Other interests
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Semiauto?
  • Umarex Steel BBs
  • Full auto
  • Back to Hornadys
  • How many BBs?
  • Shot count
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the new Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun. I’ve read reviews that say it is surprisingly accurate, so I was hopeful.

Other interests

Besides velocity, you readers had several other things you wanted me to try. I tried a few and will also report those results. Let’s go!

Hornady Black Diamond BBs

First up were Hornady Black Diamond BBs. I loaded just 10 into the magazine, because I wanted to shoot a 10-shot group. The MP40 stops shooting after the last BB is fired, so there is no risk of dry-firing and wasting CO2. The gun already had two mostly fresh cartridges in the mag from the end of the last test, so I went with those until they were exhausted.

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Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

MP40
Umarex Legends MP40 BB submachinegun.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • CO2 effect
  • Installing CO2
  • Loading
  • Umarex steel BBs
  • Fire control
  • The sensation
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Shot count
  • Hornady Black Diamonds — again
  • Bottom line

Today we look at the velocity of the new Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun. Since it has a semiautomatic mode, this will be easier than expected. However, there are special considerations for a gun like this.

CO2 effect

Most of you know that CO2 chills the gun as it is fired. And CO2 loses pressure as the temperature drops. Will that affect the velocity of this full-auto airgun? I plan to test for it. My test will show the velocity you can expect from the gun at its fastest and also what will happen as the shots happen faster and the temperature falls. There are unlimited ways of doing this, and I have selected one.

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