Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Hatsan 135 30 caliber rifle
Hatsan’s .30 caliber 135 QE Vortex is a large breakbarrel — both in size and caliber.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact 44.75 grain
  • JSB Exact 50.15-grain
  • Predator Polymag
  • Next
  • JSB domes at 25 yards
  • Predator Polymags
  • Polymags with the tips removed
  • Popeye?
  • What’s next?
  • Summary

Time for me to bend the bow of Ulysses and see what it can do. Today I have a slightly different accuracy test for you.

The test

I tested the rifle at both 10 meters and 25 yards. I shot 5-shot groups today because this rifle is just too hard for me to cock. A tired BB is a sloppy BB. All shooting was off a sandbag rest in the normal fashion and I used the artillery hold, both because I knew the rifle would be twitchy, something several readers confirmed.

Sight-in

Sight-in took five shots. As it came from the package the rifle was shooting high and right. The open sights have scales to tell you where they are and I found the windage scale most helpful, getting on target. read more


Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan 135 30 caliber rifle
Hatsan’s .30 caliber 135 QE Vortex is a large breakbarrel — both in size and caliber.

This report covers:

  • Adjusting the trigger
  • JSB Exact 50.15 grains
  • Predator Polymag
  • Air Venturi .30 caliber balls
  • JSB Exact 44.75 grains
  • Cocking effort
  • Recoil
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Time for me to bend the bow of Ulysses, which no man but he could string. Today is velocity day, plus I said I would take a closer look at adjusting the Quattro trigger. I’ll do the trigger first.

Adjusting the trigger

All of the trigger adjustments work and I adjusted them all. The trigger came out of the box breaking at 6 lbs. 10.5 oz. and I was able to get it down to 5 lbs. 4 oz. When I did the first stage went away, so I added some and now it feels right to me. I also lightened the first stage pull (1 lb. 10 oz.) by a couple ounces (1 lb. 4 oz.), though it doesn’t seem any different when I pull it. read more


Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 135 30 caliber rifle
Hatsan’s .30 caliber 135 QE Vortex is a large breakbarrel — both in size and caliber.

This report covers:

  • Not only no…
  • Calibers
  • Description
  • Stock
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Scope base
  • Ammunition
  • Do you own one?

This is the airgun I mentioned at the end of yesterday’s report. The Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle is intriguing because the caliber is so large. This is the only big bore breakbarrel I know of. But is it practical? Is it worth the effort (stay tuned for that!)? Is this an air rifle you can do anything with besides brag? I intend finding out.

Not only no…

It was 2006. I was in Josh Ungier’s office in Pyramyd Air’s old location. Josh had been showing me different cool things, like the pump-assist Benjamin 392 they were working on and we were having a great time, just talking airguns. Then he got a cagey look in his eye, which for Josh was common because he always had something bizarre cooking. He reached behind his desk and pulled out a large breakbarrel rifle and handed it to me. “Cock it, Thomas,” he said. Josh always calls me Thomas. read more


My day at Sig Sauer: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASP20
Sig Sauer’s new ASP20 gas spring breakbarrel air rifle breaks ground in many areas!

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Why a gas spring?
  • Trigger
  • Why a breakbarrel?
  • Does the ASP20 have an internal shock absorber?
  • On with the build
  • Final assembly — the stock
  • The barrel
  • Off to the range
  • Shooting sensation
  • Cocking effort
  • Accuracy
  • Whisky 3 ASP 4-12X44 scope
  • Summary

Boy, is there a LOT of interest in this new rifle! You guys are asking a lot of very good questions about the new ASP20 breakbarrel rifle, as you should. I will begin by addressing some of the most prominent ones.

Why a gas spring?

Some call it a gas piston, others say gas ram, but we are all referring to the gas spring (the industry term for a spring that uses compressed gas in place of a coiled steel spring to do its job). Gas springs replace coiled steel mainsprings in spring-piston airguns. They are more modern and easier to make and obtain, they don’t take a set if left compressed, they are less susceptible to cold and, if the design is right, they are smoother operating. They also eliminate several parts that rattle and they remove some weight from the powerplant. read more


Cool stuff

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The mostest-fastest pellet gun!/li>
  • The mostest-powerfulest
  • How to generate power
  • The deal
  • What does this mean?
  • Summary

I am at Sig today, so I won’t be able to comment as much as usual. I have airguns to test, but today I thought I would do something different. Many of our readers have gotten into modifying their guns, so I will address that today. What works, what “works” and what doesn’t.

The mostest-fastest pellet gun!

There are those who want to see just how fast a pellet can be propelled, so they put together a science experiment that uses helium as the propellant gas. They looked on the periodic table and discovered that helium is the gas with the smallest atom that is safe. Hydrogen atoms are smaller, but they remember the Hindenberg disaster. read more


Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic rifle: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman PCP
Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

This report covers:

  • The test
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm head
  • Bug Buster scope performance
  • JSB Beast
  • What now?
  • Summary

Today we see how the Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic air rifle does at 50 yards. Get ready for a pleasant surprise!

The test

I shot the rifle last Friday, which was my banner day at the range. The weather was perfect with no hint of a breeze — perfect for testing the accuracy of an air rifle. The test was ourdoors at 50 yards. I shot off a sandbag rest and the rifle was scoped with the UTG 3-12X32 Bug Buster scope.

Beeman PCP scoped
The Bug Buster 3-12 scope is a perfect match for the QB Chief.

I looked at the 25-yard test results and selected the two best pellets. First up was the H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm head. At 25 yards the QB put ten of them in 0.334-inches. Sight-in took several rounds and then I shot the first group. I filled the rifle after each group, as we have established that the QB Chief gets around 15 good shots per fill to 2000 psi. read more


2018 Texas Airgun show

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • FWB 110
  • Daisy 99 first variation
  • Daisy Targeteer gallery and gun
  • Daisy Critter Gitter
  • Daystate CR97 prototype
  • O’Connell rifle
  • Shooting!
  • RAW
  • Big bores
  • Hammer
  • More on the show
  • Prizes galore!
  • The end

It happened last Saturday and if you were there you saw what I am about to report. If you missed it, too bad, because I think it was the best show yet.

Airgun shows usually have a theme; this one had several. Airguns that are never seen was one of them. Let’s start there.

FWB 110

Reader JerryC laid an FWB 110 on my table for display throughout the show. How rare is it? Well, this is the first one I have seen.

FWB 110
It may look like an FWB 150 or 300, but the 110 was the one that started them all.

The 110 is unique because it doesn’t have the anti-recoil mechanism in the stock. It recoils, though this one doesn’t move very much. It was tuned and resealed by Dave Slade and is a masterpiece of a recoiling 10-meter target rifle. Think of a tuned HW55CM or a Walther LGV and you will have it. How do I know? I shot it! Yes, you will be getting a 3-part review! read more