Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Assembling the ball bearing cages
  • Two cages — inner and outer
  • The real sear
  • Trigger assembly
  • Finish the assembly
  • Trigger adjustment
  • Test the rifle
  • Summary

And I’m going to pick it up right where we left off on Friday. A reminder that I am in Las Vegas at the SHOT Show today and will not be able to respond to comments as easily as normal. Let’s get started.

Assembling the ball bearing cages

We have come to the most daunting part of the assembly — assembling the trigger unit. You have to put a swarm of loose parts into the spring tube under tension from both the mainspring and the trigger spring. First, put the lubricated spring guide into the rear of the mainspring. I forgot to do that the first time through and I assembled the rifle without the guide. Got the rifle all buttoned up and said those famous last words, “I hope I never have to do THAT again!” Then my eyes fell on the guide sitting on the table. It was smiling at me, and I’m pretty sure I heard God laugh a little! read more


Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • SHOT Show
  • Today and Monday
  • New parts
  • Scragging?
  • Lubricating the mainspring
  • Rust removal
  • Lubrication
  • Putting the piston into the spring tube
  • Pull the trigger!
  • Attach the barrel
  • Break

Many of you have been reading this series in which I tune reader Michael’s Winchester 427 that is actually a Diana 27. This is not an air rifle for beginners to learn on! The mechanism is too complex for first-timers for a number of reasons that should become clear today.

SHOT Show

I have to tell you — this is a very lengthy report. I won’t get it all done today, so Monday I will finish up. And on Monday I will be in Las Vegas at the SHOT Show. I won’t see your comments as frequently as usual while I’m there next week, plus after I walk out of the show every day I have to go back to my room, write the next day’s blog and have it ready to publish by 9 p.m. which is midnight on the east coast where the WordPress server publishes the blog. So please don’t ask me any lengthy questions. I am not going to have dinner with anyone this year, so I can do my work without being whipsawed! read more


DIY Rifle Stock – Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is Part 4 of reader Vana’s excellent report on stock making.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, Hank.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Slavia 618

This is my original 55 year old Slavia 618 in its new “firewood” stock. I made this one in a “camo” style, using cherry and maple blocks in a random arrangement of the pieces.

This report covers:

  • The Firewood stock
  • Why firewood?
  • How do we do this?
  • Some design considerations
  • Is your wood dry enough?
  • What if I want to start right now?
  • Microwaving wood – how does it work?
  • Art or science?
  • Microwaving wood summarized
  • Working with the blocks
  • Summary

The Firewood stock

And now for something completely different – an additive construction stock made from firewood. I’ve made a couple of these and have been pleased with the results — there’s lots of artistic opportunity to make a stock that is special. read more


DIY Rifle Stock – Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier
Today’s report is Part 3 of reader Vana’s excellent report on stock making.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, Hank.

Part 1
Part 2

Slavia 618
This is my original 55 year old Slavia 618 in its new “firewood” stock. I made this one in a “camo” style, using cherry and maple blocks in a random arrangement of the pieces.

This report covers:

  • Parts of the hand
  • The model
  • Getting ready
  • About the grip
  • Carving the grip
  • The Try-Gun stock
  • Summary

Parts of the hand

parts of the hand
Legend: These are parts of the hand that I will reference in my discussion of the grip.

I made this legend so that it will be easier to follow my explanations. In the picture, my grip is relaxed and open so I can label the parts clearly. When actually holding the grip, my thumb (1st Digit) would wrap around the grip causing the Thenar region to move down to follow the top of the Palmar region perimeter (purple line), and the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers would be curled in more. read more


Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Reader MarklinJHawkland
  • The blind pin
  • Sheared the screw
  • The lesson
  • Cleaning the spring tube
  • Other cleaning
  • The assembly
  • Summary

I’m tuning and overhauling reader Michael’s .22 caliber Diana 27, which is actually a Winchester 427. In Part one I disassembled it and in Part two I showed you how the ball bearing trigger works. In Part three I talked about removing the old piston seal that had a screw that was stuck. I have a lot more to say about that today.

Reader MarklinJHawkland
This is the reader who solved the puzzle. I knew there is a pin in the head of the piston, because when I disassembled the rifle someone had tapped that pin in far enough for me to see it. Unfortunately it was probably that and not the rust that had jammed the screw in place. read more


Webley Service Mark II: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service rifle
Webley Mark II Service Rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

Today’s report is another in the series I did on the Webley Mark II Service rifle. Today’s post is by reader RidgeRunner, who now owns the rifle. He tells us about his rifle’s performance after the maintenance he reported in Part 6.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, take it away, RidgeRunner.

This report covers:

  • A Round Tuit
  • My Chrony Rig
  • Into The Breech!
  • RWS Super H-Point
  • Eley Wasp
  • H&N Sniper Light
  • H&N Field Target
  • JSB Exact Jumbo RS
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Crosman Premier Hollow Point
  • H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Summary

A Round Tuit

round tuit

Well, it took me a while to get to this, but now that I have a round tuit I can start doing the velocity test on this old gal. Since I spent most of a warm, calm, sunny Sunday shooting this air rifle, you might want to make sure you have a full cup of coffee before you go much further. read more


Best equipment or the best training?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Best equipment?
  • Why not cheap?
  • Airgunner’s dreams
  • Why?
  • One gun to rule them all
  • Thanks Hank
  • One final type of table saw
  • And one final airgun — is it a hybrid?
  • Summary

I almost titled today’s report as an open letter to the airgun industry, because I believe there is a lot for them in here. But there is also a lot for the average airgunner. Reader Vana should be flattered because his excellent report on stockmaking yesterday prompted all that I am about to say.

Best equipment?

As I read Vana’s report, I mused about making stocks myself. Like that will ever happen. It’s like watching a Fred Astair movie and deciding to take dance lessons, I guess. Only, when it comes to dancing, the movie I should watch is Godzilla.

But here is what I actually did. I went online and researched table saws. Yes, I really did! I discovered that table saws fall into several categories that range from cheap, through portable or jobsite, up to contractor and finally cabinet, which is the pinnacle. I discovered that I wanted to pay for a portable (usually under $400) but to get one with the features of a cabinet ($5,000 to $10,000). However I did not like the extreme weight of the cabinet models (450-600 lbs.) and wanted my saw to weigh more in the contractor range (225-250 lbs.). Hey! I’m an airgunner when it comes to table saws! read more