The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Do I plan my blogs?
  • So — why this one?
  • The sight
  • P1 damaged
  • How does it look?
  • Impressions
  • Summary

It’s been a long time since we looked at this pistol. Part 9 was published nearly a year ago. And the series was started on the first of November, 2017. So, let me bring you up to speed.

As I was packing up to leave the 2017 Texas Airgun Show, a gentleman approached me for a trade. We traded and I ended up with a Beeman P1 pistol. I already owned a P1 that I had purchased many years before, but this one was nice and it came with everything I needed to rebuild the powerplant — if that was required. read more


Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman DPMS SBR
Crosman’s DPMS SBR full auto BB gun.

This report covers:

  • What is it?
  • Watch the video
  • The gun
  • Blowback
  • Controls
  • Disassembly
  • Stock
  • Forearm
  • Loading
  • Shot count
  • Bolt holdopen
  • Sights
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun. First — the acronyms. DPMS = Defense Procurement Manufacturing Services. WHAT??? It’s a shop that was initially in Osseo, Minnesota and opened in 1985. It started manufacturing parts for military weapons like the M16. It’s now part of a larger conglomerate that’s located in Huntsville, Alabama. SBR = Short Barrel Rifle. Another name for a carbine, and, in this case, the rifle that was shortened was already a carbine.

What is it?

The DPMS SBR is Crosman’s select-fire BB gun that shoots 25 BBs per magazine. Select fire means both full and semiautomatic fire are available via the conventional M16 selector switch. Gun bashers will tell you that AR-15s are automatic, but in fact that is incorrect. Civilians in the U.S. may not purchase full auto firearms without a lengthy process that vets the owner, tying the gun to him by serial number, and costs $200 per firearm so registered. AR-15s are semiautomatic, only, so a selector switch applies to the full auto military platform, only. read more


The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Sorted pellets
  • Sorting RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Pre-test work
  • Another test?
  • Modifications?
  • Back to the test
  • 4.55 Premier
  • 4.56 Premier
  • The test changes
  • Deep seated again
  • Meisterkugeln with 4.54mm heads
  • Discussion

Today I will conduct the accuracy tests of the Beeman P1 that you readers requested. There’s a lot of ground to cover, so let’s begin.

Sorted pellets

Based on the fliers I was getting in Part 6, you asked me to sort the pellets by head size. I chose the Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellet and the RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle pellet for this test, because they both performed the best in the last accuracy test.

I used the PelletGage to sort pellets by head size. Premiers were first, and I discovered their heads ranged from 4.54mm to larger than 4.56mm, which is the largest hole on my gage. Most were either 4.55 or 4.56mm, with 4.56mm being the most common. read more


Blowguns — the first airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is a guest blog from reader Hiveseeker. Today he reflects on the very first airguns — blowguns

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now over to you, Hiveseeker.

Blowguns — the first airguns
by Hiveseeker

This report covers:

  • Airgun history
  • Blowgun calibers
  • Blowgun length
  • Popular .40 and .50 caliber darts
  • Popular .625 caliber darts
  • A word about blowgun hunting
  • Blowgun accessories
  • Make a blowgun target
  • How to blow that blowgun
  • Aiming a blowgun
  • For further study

lead photo
Modern-day blowguns come in .40, .50, and .625 caliber. Note the accessory dart quivers.

Airgun history

Here at the Airgun Academy blog B.B. has done a great job of sharing his passion and knowledge of airgun history, deepening our appreciation for our favorite sport. Today we’ll be traveling even further into the past as we delve back to the earliest roots of airgun history — the blowgun! B.B. took us there in 2007 when he wrote about The blowgun Where it all began, and observed that “As airgun collectors become more interested in their hobby, they eventually start acquiring blowguns.” read more


Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Fill problem
  • Air Venturi G6 pump
  • Sight alignment problems
  • Accuracy
  • Summary

I had some operational issues today and learned some things that may be useful to new owners of the Benjamin Wildfire. Today’s test was ostensibly to mount a dot sight and test the rifle for accuracy at 10 meters. This is in preparation for moving back to 25 yards.

Fill problem

First up is a problem I had when filling the rifle. I filled from two different large Carbon fiber tanks and both have this problem. When I try to bleed the line to disconnect the rifle from the tank, the pressure in the line holds the inlet valve of the rifle open and all the air in the reservoir leaks out. read more


Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

This report covers:

  • Let’s get it straight
  • Different desires
  • PCPs
  • Actually
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • How difficult is it to fill with a hand pump?
  • A good way to enter the world of PCP
  • Yes, but a hand pump costs more than the rifle!!!
  • Today was not planned

Let’s get it straight

This is the season of the tax refund, here in the U.S. tax refunds come in all shapes and sizes. If you work for an employer, your options of controlling the size of your refund are few — just whatever choices the payroll service allows. Usually they can adjust it so the refund is as low as possible, but always a positive number, so you owe no additional money when your taxes are computed. Or if you prefer, more can be deducted each pay period so the refund is larger.

For those who are self-employed, the options are greater. You either pay your estimated taxes quarterly, or you wait until the end of the year and have a very large bill due. Or you hire a payroll service and they help you sculpt your withholding to whatever suits you. read more


Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • Scoped
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Discussion
  • Umarex Precision Steel BBs
  • Results

I said I would come back to the Brice scope base for the Daisy Red Ryder BB gun, and today is the day. As you may recall from Part 4, the spacer under the rear of the base I am testing is too tall for the gun and it makes the gun shoot too high. I trimmed about a third off the height for today’s test.

Scoped

I also mounted a vintage Leapers Accushot 3-12X44 SWAT mil dot scope that looks like the scope I linked to, except it doesn’t have the etched reticle or illumination.

Daisy Red Ryder scoped
This Leapers scope is an oldie, but it still works great. Looks big on the Red Ryder, doesn’t it? read more