Hatsan Bullmaster PCP: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan Bullmaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Mounting the rings
  • Problem
  • Enter BKL
  • Two strap rings
  • More to mounting a scope
  • Shim the rear mount
  • Position and level the scope
  • Adjust the eyepiece
  • Thickness of the reticle lines
  • Is this scope clear?
  • Scope mounted — what’s next?
  • Summary

Today is Part 3 of my report on the new Hatsan Bullmaster precharged pneumatic airgun, but you may recall that I introduced two new products in Part 2 — the new UTG 3-12X32 AO Bug Buster scope and some UTG Accu-Sync scope rings that are so new they aren’t even on the Pyramyd Air website yet. Normally in Part 3 I start testing the accuracy of the airgun under review, but today I’m going to discuss mounting this new scope and getting the rifle set up to test. With all the new readers that have joined us over the past several months it seems like the right thing to do. Let’s get started.

read more


Hatsan BullMaster PCP: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan BullMaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

This report covers:

  • Like the Sortie
  • Comparisons?
  • Companies change over time
  • Description
  • Fill
  • Pressure gauge
  • Magazines
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • So much more to tell
  • Next

Today I start my review of the Hatsan BullMaster precharged pneumatic air rifle. This is a repeating semiautomatic air rifle in bullpup configuration. It is available in both .177 and .22 calibers and the published energies, 21/31 foot-pounds, respectively, are right where they should be for a handy hunting air rifle. I am testing the .22, but since it was sent directly from Hatsan, I won’t publish the serial number. Your chances of getting this particular airgun are slim.

Like the Sortie

I tested the Sortie semiautomatic air pistol for you in a 5-part review back in September and October, and I did it intentionally. I had this BullMaster at that time, and since the actions of the two airguns are so similar, I wanted to start with the smaller one first. Testing the Sortie got me ready for the BullMaster.

read more


Hatsan Hercules QE .45 caliber big bore air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Hercules 45
Hatsan Hercules QE .45 caliber big bore rifle.

This report covers:

  • Big gun!
  • Description
  • .45 bullets and “pellets”
  • 1000 cc reservoir capacity
  • Onboard air gauge
  • 250 bar fill
  • Adjustable stock
  • Adjustable trigger
  • Barrel
  • Sights
  • I shot the Hercules
  • Sound
  • Evaluation

Big gun!

I’m starting a report on the Hatsan Hercules QE .45 big bore air rifle. First let me observe that this rifle is BIG. And I mean big in all ways. It’s 48.4 inches long and weighs 13 pounds before a scope is attached. I was surprised by that number, so I put it on a balance beam scale, and the rifle I am testing came to exactly 13 lbs.

The Hercules rifles come in the following calibers: .22, .25, .30, .357 and .45. Some of the specifications like magazine capacity differ by caliber (the .22 magazine holds 14 pellets), but the length and weight remain the same throughout the range.

read more


The Hatsan Sortie PCP pistol: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Sortie
Hatsan Sortie semiautomatic pistol.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Shooting with a scope
  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Field Target Trophy with 5.53mm head
  • H&N Sniper Light
  • Last pellet — Baracuda with 5.50mm head
  • Summary and evaluation

Today we see how accurate the new Hatsan Sortie pistol is at 25 yards. Remember, this is a true semiautomatic .22-caliber air pistol that looks ideal for hunting.

Shooting with a scope

Several readers wondered how the pistol could be held to shoot with a rifle scope attached. I said I didn’t want to try a pistol scope and readers know the eye relief with a rifle scope is about three inches or less, so how can that work? I promised to show you in this report, so let’s do that now.

I mounted a UTG 10X44 Mini SWAT scope on the Sortie. That scope is either discontinued or out of stock, but it looks quite similar to the UTG 10X50 SWAT scope. All the features are identical.

read more


Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider
Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Rear sight comes off
  • The test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Next up — JSB Exact Jumbos!
  • One more pellet
  • Conclusion

Let’s get right to it. Today we learn just how accurate is the .22-caliber Diana Stormrider I’m testing. In Part 3 I probably had difficulty seeing the open sights, but today I have scoped the rifle with a UTG SWAT 3-12X44 sidewheel scope. I have mounted it in BKL 30mm high rings. These are the thin rings with two screws per cap, because the Stormrider receiver doesn’t accept rings with a long base.

Rear sight comes off

The rear sight had to be removed for the bell of the scope to clear. The sight base, which is also the barrel band, remained on the rifle — just the adjustable rear notch had to come off.

read more


They have the wrong twist rate!: Part 2

usby Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Been awhile
  • New airgunners
  • A better way
  • Doing what works
  • The point
  • Sharpening straight razors

Been awhile

Part 1 of this report was written way back in the beginning of February. I think the reason it’s taken me so long to get back to it is I titled it wrong. I will discuss that as we go, but first let me define who “they” are. In the words of comedian, Red Green, “They” are everybody who is not us. Now that that’s clear we can continue.

Part 1 was a treatise on twist rates and how they affect accuracy. As many of you are aware, I use this blog to school both new airgunners and also airgun manufacturers — who are often as ignorant of the facts as new airgunners, but cannot or will not admit it. No engineer who has just been hired by an airgun company is going to admit there is something he doesn’t know about guns! Heaven forbid! And neither is any CEO or owner of a company, because in their minds they are in a position of authority and should therefore know!

read more


Revisiting the BSA GRT Lightning XL SE: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This is Part 2 of a guest blog from reader Dennis. He sent this to me a month ago, but I got so busy that I forgot about it until he reminded me last week.

This is about the air rifle he really enjoys. If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now over to you, Dennis.

Revisiting the BSA GRT Lightning XL SE: Part 2

By Dennis

BSA GRT Lightning
BSA GRT Lightning XL SE.

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Mea culpa
  • Process modifications
  • Groups at 20, 30 and 40 yards
  • Trajectory
  • Conclusion

Introduction

In Part 1 I reviewed the BSA GRT Lightning LX SE (.22 caliber), discussed several issues and showed results of several groups shot at 15 yards. I was encouraged to extend the range beyond 15 yards and report back the results. Thus this Part 2.
If you have not yet read Part 1, you can find it via the link above. Feel free to check it out now. I’ll wait here for you.

read more