Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman DPMS SBR
Crosman’s DPMS SBR full auto BB gun.

This report covers:

  • What is it?
  • Watch the video
  • The gun
  • Blowback
  • Controls
  • Disassembly
  • Stock
  • Forearm
  • Loading
  • Shot count
  • Bolt holdopen
  • Sights
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun. First — the acronyms. DPMS = Defense Procurement Manufacturing Services. WHAT??? It’s a shop that was initially in Osseo, Minnesota and opened in 1985. It started manufacturing parts for military weapons like the M16. It’s now part of a larger conglomerate that’s located in Huntsville, Alabama. SBR = Short Barrel Rifle. Another name for a carbine, and, in this case, the rifle that was shortened was already a carbine.

What is it?

The DPMS SBR is Crosman’s select-fire BB gun that shoots 25 BBs per magazine. Select fire means both full and semiautomatic fire are available via the conventional M16 selector switch. Gun bashers will tell you that AR-15s are automatic, but in fact that is incorrect. Civilians in the U.S. may not purchase full auto firearms without a lengthy process that vets the owner, tying the gun to him by serial number, and costs $200 per firearm so registered. AR-15s are semiautomatic, only, so a selector switch applies to the full auto military platform, only. read more


Diana Stormrider Generation II precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider II
Diana Stormrider Generation II precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Stormrider Gen 1 Part 4

This report covers:

  • Fill
  • RWS Superdome
  • Discharge sound
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Chronograph
  • Last pellet
  • Discussion
  • Trigger pull and adjustment
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the .177-caliber Diana Stormrider. I linked to Part 4 of my test of the .22 caliber rifle last year for comparison, but the rifle I’m testing today is a .177-caliber second-generation airgun, where that last test was a first generation. Part 1 of this report discusses the differences.

In Part 1 of this report I made a big deal about this Stormrider’s fill adaptor coming with a male Foster fitting on the end that connects to the hose of most air tanks. However, in re-reading the other report I see that the Gen 1 gun had one, as well, so Diana has thought this through from the very beginning. read more


Sharpshooter rubber band catapult gun: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

Sharpshooter pistol
The Sharpshooter catapult pistol was made from the early 1930s until the 1980s by as many as 5 different companies. This one was made in the early 1940s.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Test 1
  • Test 1 continued
  • Discussion
  • Firing behavior
  • What’s next?
  • Test 2 — A modern Sharpshooter
  • More discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Sharpshooter catapult pistol. Since there is only one type of ammo for it, I have added something additional to spice up the report. Let’s get to it.

The ad from 1948 said the pistol could hit a fly at 16 feet. Dean Fletcher tested his at a more reasonable 10 feet, which is what I will do. Readers asked me what kind of target I used and today I will tell you. Using a coat hanger, I made a wire target holder that stands up, and wrapped a single sheet of aluminum foil around the edges of the loop at the top. It’s the same target I used for the Daisy Targeteer test. read more


Benjamin Fortitude precharged rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Fortitude
The Benjamin Fortitude precharged air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Second rifle
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Trigger
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Premier lites again
  • Shot count
  • Discharge sound
  • Test target
  • Evaluation

Today we resume our look at the Benjamin Fortitude precharged air rifle. I will summarize where we have been, so folks reading this report for the first time will understand what is happening.

Second rifle

This is the second Fortitude I have tested. Parts 1 and 2 of this report belong to the first rifle. The first rifle’s inlet valve locked up at the end of the velocity test and remained open when I bled the air after the fill. The entire gun exhausted all its air. I tried to fill it several times, just to be sure. So I stopped the test at that point and requested a replacement rifle in the same .177 caliber. While this is Part 3, I will actually run another velocity test today, since this is a brand new airgun. read more


Benjamin Fortitude precharged rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Fortitude
The Benjamin Fortitude precharged air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Point one
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Why such a large velocity spread?
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Shot count
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Inlet valve failed
  • Evaluation so far

Today we look at the velocity of the Benjamin Fortitude. As this is one of the new price point PCPs, this test should be interesting.

Point one

My test rifle leaked down from the initial fill in three hours. I had filled it to 3,000 psi, then set it aside to do other work. When I returned three hours later nearly all the air had leaked out. However when I refilled it, I couldn’t hear a leak. It was apparently slow enough to allow testing, so I proceeded.

Crosman Premier lites

The first pellet I tested was the Crosman Premier 7.9-grain dome. They averaged 885 f.p.s. over 10 shots. The low was 872 and the high was 900 f.p.s. That’s an 18 f.p.s. spread. At the average velocity this pellet produced 13.74 foot pounds of energy at the muzzle. read more


Benjamin Fortitude precharged rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Fortitude
The Benjamin Fortitude precharged air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Price-point PCP
  • Not a Marauder!
  • Description
  • Stock
  • Shrouded barrel
  • Free-floated barrel
  • Regulator
  • Impressive!
  • Conclusions

Today we begin our look at yet another price-point PCP — the Benjamin Fortitude. Unlike the Umarex Gauntlet that was the first price-point PCP to be announced, and then suffered early launch jitters, the Fortitude stayed under wraps until the airgun company formerly known as Crosman decided it was ready.

Price-point PCP

What is a price-point PCP? An argument could be made that the Benjamin Discovery was the first one, though if you go down that path you will soon turn up a crowd of similarly low-priced PCPs. We have looked at several of them over the years. But they are not what I am calling price-point PCPs. Those airguns are fine, basic airguns. A price-point PCP is a precharged pneumatic that offers features formerly found only on guns costing many times the penny-under-$300 that the market has decided to make the line in the sand. In short, a price-point PCP (PPP) is one that gives a lot of value for the price. read more


Diana Chaser air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana Chaser air pistol
The Diana Chaser is a new CO2 pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Qiang Yuan Match pellets
  • Adjusted the sights
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Pellets jamming
  • Trigger pull changed
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • RWS Superdome
  • The magazine
  • Open sights visible?
  • RWS Superdomes through the magazine
  • Discussion
  • Surprise!

Today is accuracy day for the Diana Chaser air pistol. I threw in some extra tests just for fun. This should be interesting, so let’s go!

The test

I shot off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I used the single shot tray for the first 4 groups, then switched to the magazine for the final group. There were some interesting results that I couldn’t have predicted.

Qiang Yuan Match pellets

I shot the first group with Qiang Yuan Match pellets. No particular reason for that, other than I had them ready. They hit the target low and to the left, but I left the sights where they were and shot all 10 pellets. They landed in a group that measures 1.052-inches between centers. This was larger than I had hoped for the Chaser. read more