Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2 cartridge
  • O-ring material
  • Velocity
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Discussion
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of my Crosman Mark I Target pistol. This will be interesting because I don’t remember ever doing it. I probably did, but without a report to read I can’t remember.

Loading the CO2 cartridge

Usually on a CO2 pistol that stores the 12-gram CO2 cartridge in the grip, one of the grip panels comes off to remove and install the cartridge — the left one, more often than not. Not so with this pistol. Instead there is a large knurled cap at the bottom of the grip that is removed, and the cartridge inside slides out. If there is still significant gas in the gun, the pressure will force the o-ring in the cap to seal the cap tight and it may not rotate. Don’t use pliers to force it! Shoot the gun until the gas is gone or almost gone. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Mark II
  • The pistol
  • Two power levels
  • Grips
  • Sights
  • The trigger
  • Power
  • The pinnacle of its time
  • Ergonomics
  • Modified guns
  • How long do they hold?
  • Summary

I wanted to write about the Crosman Mark I target pistol today, but was afraid I might have reported on it too many times in the recent past. However, when I looked, I discovered that I have never fully tested this airgun for you! I wrote about it back in 2005 and re-ran that report in July of 2015, but apparently I’ve never gone all the way and done a complete test. That ends today.

History

The .22 caliber Mark I Target pistols were made by Crosman from 1966 to 1983. In 1980 Crosman removed the power adjustment capability from the gun, so those made from ’66 to ’80 are called the first variation, while those made from ’80 to ’83 without power adjustment are called the second variation. The first variation guns are considered more desirable, only because of the additional feature of power adjustment. read more


How the Price-Point PCP (PPP) has changed the face of the airgun world

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex’s Gauntlet was the first PPP to be announced, but several others beat it to the marketplace.

This report covers:

  • Gauntlet dropped!
  • For Hank
  • For the manufacturers
  • What is a PPP?
  • Cost
  • Required features
  • Nice features to have
  • Caliber
  • ALL BOATS ARE FLOATED!
  • Compressors
  • Other PCPs
  • Sig
  • AirForce Airguns
  • On and on
  • Summary

Gauntlet dropped!

When Umarex announced the new Gauntlet air rifle the savvy airgunning world was stunned. A precharged pneumatic (PCP) that was a repeater, was shrouded with an active silencer, had an adjustable trigger and stock, was accurate and came with a regulator — all for less than $300. They named it appropriately, because it was a huge gauntlet to drop on the airgun community. I’m sure this is exactly what Umarex had in mind, though the particulars of how it has and still is unfolding I’m sure have been as much of a surprise to them as they have been to others. read more


Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistol
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Action
  • Sights
  • Light rail
  • Holsters
  • Disassembly
  • Installing CO2
  • Removing and installing the magazine
  • Manual
  • Works with BBs
  • Summary

Just a reminder that I’m in the hospital today, so I can’t answer questions. Hopefully I will be back home sometime tomorrow.

This is the completion of my description of the new Sig P320 M17 pellet pistol. Now I need to explain something. This pellet pistol is marked M17 — not P320 M17. Sig calls it the P320 M17, so it is correctly identified both here and on the Pyramyd Air website. But I told you that I bought the P320 M17 firearm, and it is marked with both numbers. Let me show you.

Sig M17 pellet pistol markings
On the top left of the slide the pellet pistol is just marked M17. This is also how the Army sidearm is marked. read more


Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistoll
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

This report covers:

  • M17 differences
  • M17 pellet pistol
  • My grand plan
  • What’s up?
  • Lookalikes are coming to the top
  • Back to the M17 pellet pistol
  • Operation
  • Disassembly
  • Same heft
  • Summary

To all our American readers I want to wish a very happy Thanksgiving. Now, on to today’s report.

On January 19, 2017 it was announced that the U.S. Army had selected the Sig Sauer P320 pistol for their new Modular Handgun System. The full-sized gun is called the M17 and the carry-sized weapon is the M18. The rest of the U.S. armed forces also have or will have this sidearm. The nominal caliber for the U.S. military is the 9X19mm pistol cartridge that is best-known as the 9mm Luger.

M17 differences

The M17 is not just a P320 by a different name. The Army specified certain performance requirements for their pistol and they require Sig to maintain a strict separation in their plants between Army contract guns and similar civilian guns. This not only covers the finished guns but also all parts. read more


Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Crosman DPMS SBR
Crosman’s DPMS SBR full auto BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Summary
  • The report
  • The test
  • Hornady Black Diamond
  • Second group
  • Hornady full auto
  • Crosman Copperheads
  • Copperheads full auto
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Next?
  • Summary

Summary

Buy it, buy it, buy it! The Crosman DPMS SBR is a best buy, both in a reliable full auto BB gun and also in one that’s accurate.

That was my summary. Do I even need to write the rest of the report?

The report

Oh, all right! I’m here anyway, so let me show you what happened. Today is accuracy day for the DPMS and I was excited to see what it can do. I had seen indications of accuracy at the NRA Show a couple months ago, and in his video report Tyler Patner also showed us some good targets at a range farther than we normally shoot BB guns.

The test

Tyler shot at 10 yards. I’m shooting at the usual 5 meters (16.4 feet) until I know that the DPMS is really accurate. You’ll see why when I tell you what I plan on doing. read more


Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Crosman DPMS SBR
Crosman’s DPMS SBR full auto BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Never run out of bullets
  • The feel of the gun when firing
  • Here we go!
  • Left cartridge first
  • Copperheads first
  • How does it feel, single-shot?
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond
  • How many shots?
  • Using the BB speedloader
  • Full auto
  • Test 1
  • Test 2
  • Test 3
  • Test 4
  • Test 5
  • Test 6
  • Discussion
  • Test 7
  • Shot count
  • Feel of full auto
  • Trigger pull
  • Forgot I had to cock it
  • Summary

Never run out of bullets

The first part of this report didn’t receive that many comments, but those who did say something said similar things. The first was you all want this gun to never run out of BBs. You want it to get no less than 150 shots before it’s time to reload.

When I was a kid I wanted the same thing. I wanted all my guns to hold an infinite numbers of bullet, so they would never run out. Then I went into the Army and got to shoot many fully automatic weapons. I quickly learned that the first thing you want in a machine gun is reliability.

I remember that the M85 .50 caliber machine gun that was designed for fitting inside the turrets of armored vehicles was the worst machine gun to exist since the French Chauchat of WWI. It jammed all the time and seldom would fire an entire belt of ammo without stopping. You had to lubricate the cartridges with fireproof hydraulic oil to keep the gun operating. read more