Sheridan Supergrade: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • JSB Exact
  • Crosman Premier
  • Sheridan Cylindricals
  • Predator Polymag
  • Crosman Premiers
  • H&N Baracuda
  • H&N Field Target Trophy
  • Evaluation so far
  • 10-shot group
  • Summary
  • 22 caliber club

Today I moved back to 25 yards to test the Sheridan Supergrade. There were also a couple extra tests readers asked me to do and they are included in this report.

The test

I shot with the rifle rested on a sandbag. I pumped the rifle 5 times for every shot in today’s report. I also wore my reading glasses to make the front sight as sharp as possible. The bullseye became a little fuzzier than usual, but I think you are going to see that it didn’t matter. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Sight adjustment
  • Qiang Yuan training pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • Last group
  • Evaluation thus far

Today we begin to look at the accuracy of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump rifle. But before we start, there is a picture I owe some readers.

Dragonfly open
The pump handle is fully extended.

The test

I decided to pump the rifle 3 times per shot for the entire test. In Part 2 we saw how powerful it is, and three pumps are more than enough for any pellet. The distance for this test was 10 meters and the rifle was rested. I used the open sights for today’s test. I shot 5 shots per bull and then selected the best pellet and shot a final group of 10. Let’s get started. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sheridan Cylindrical
  • JSB Exact
  • Adjusted the sight
  • Velocity
  • Crosman Premiers
  • H&N Field Target Trophy
  • Next

Today we test the accuracy of the Sheridan Supergrade at 10 meters. Let’s get started.

The test

I shot off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. The rifle was pumped 4 times for every shot. As you learned Friday, the trigger was set as light as it will go, which is 4 lbs. 10 oz.

I decided to shoot 5-shot groups and then to select the best pellet to shoot a 10-shot group. I went that way because a multi-pump takes so long to get ready for each shot. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade left
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Adjustable trigger!
  • Trigger-pull
  • Courage arrives!
  • Safety
  • Adjust the bolt handle position
  • Velocity
  • Test 1.
  • Test 2.
  • Test 3.
  • Pump effort
  • Summary

We’re back at it with the Sheridan Supergrade today. I will get to the velocity testing, but there are still a couple more surprises before that.

Adjustable trigger!

That’s right; the Sheridan Supergrade came with an adjustable trigger! Imagine that — an airgun from the 1940s with a trigger that adjusts.

The trigger adjusted in a unique way — by changing the location of the sear spring on a notched bar. To do this the rifle has to be out of the stock, which is not as straightforward as it is with some guns, so I won’t do it today. But I may work up the courage to try it at some point in our test. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The focus
  • Pumping
  • Pump effort
  • Velocity
  • Test 1. Crosman Premier lite
  • Test 2. Crosman Premier lite
  • Test 3. Two other pellets
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • RWS Hobby
  • Seating pellets
  • Pump lever noise
  • Storing the rifle with air
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump rifle. There certainly is a lot of interest in this air rifle. Some have noted its similarity with the Diana Stormrider and wonder if the Dragonfly can be considered a precharged pneumatic with a built-in pump. Others are quick to point out this rifle is made in China by Snow Peak Airguns (SPA).

Several readers could not envision the pump arm of the rifle from the picture I posted, so here is a side view.

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly side view.

The focus

While it’s nice to know the lineage of the rifle, my interest is how well the Dragonfly performs. Reader Benji-Don sent me his impressions of the rifle, which I will start sharing with you today. This is velocity day, so that’s where we will start. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade left
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Chronograph
  • How long can a multi-pump be left fully pressurized?
  • The point
  • Smith and Hatcher were right!
  • Condition of the rifle
  • Last comment

Before we start I would like to introduce you to Jake. He is the best Sheridan resource I know. Here is his website. Much of the information I have is either obtained from or corroborated on that site.

Siraniko, you were right. I’m doing Part 2 today!

Chronograph

Reader GunFun1 wondered how velocity was determined back in 1947 and 1956, when General Hatcher and W.H.B. Smith wrote their reports on the Supergrade. Well, it’s found in that book nobody wants — Smith’s Standard Encyclopedia of Gas, Air and Spring Guns of the World, by W.H.B. Smith. At least the method that Smith used is found there. It was called the Potter chronograph and occupied several rooms at H.P. White Laboratories. At its heart was a quartz crystal oscillator that cycled 100,000 times a second. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade left
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The back story
  • Early reports
  • How many pumps?
  • So — how many pumps?
  • We’re just getting started!
  • Description
  • Why so much?
  • SO — why 12 pumps?
  • Summary

Awww! Not again! BB — you promised us something very special today. You have reviewed and tested the Sheridan Supergrade so many times on this blog!

Yes, I have. But this report will be different. This report will have a major impact on not just Supergrade owners, but on most multi-pump owners.

The back story

Several weeks ago a new reader posted that he had a Sheridan Supergrade to sell. I have to approve all new readers’ comments, so I approved and posted his, welcomed him to the blog and, because he included his email address in the message, I contacted him. read more