1896 New King Single Shot: Part 4

Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

1896 King
1896 New King single shot BB gun.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • 4.55 mm lead ball
  • Moved to 10 feet
  • The first “group”
  • Second thing I did wrong
  • Correction
  • 4.50 mm ball
  • Marksman BBs
  • Summary

I couldn’t resist! I just had to know how this old girl shot. So today we will find out together.

The test

I started the test at 5 meters, like all BB gun tests. I rested the gun on the UTG monopod and I sat in a chair. I vowed to push all the balls down the barrel with the cleaning rod, but I changed that one time while the test was underway. Let’s get started!

4.55 mm lead ball

First to be tested was the 4.55 mm lead ball that comes as close as possible to the 0.180-inch BB caliber. It measures 0.179-inches in diameter. I fired the first shot and the sound from downrange was not what I expected. So I went and examined the target. There were no holes in the target! read more


Dan Wesson Valor 1911 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson Valor
Dan Wesson Valor 1911 CO2 pellet pistol.

This report covers:

  • History
  • New cartridge
  • Service use
  • Features that were changed
  • The Valor
  • Repeater
  • No blowback
  • Sights
  • Licensed replica
  • Barrel
  • Summary

Today we start looking at a new pellet pistol — the Dan Wesson Valor 1911. They call it a 1911, but this pellet pistol is a replica of a 1911A1 if ever I saw one. Let’s begin the report by learning the difference between the two firearm models.

History

The Colt 1911 pistol was designed by John Moses Browning in — that’s right — 1911. Earlier versions of the gun competed in rigorous Army trials, along with many other pistols from around the world — including the gun we call the German Luger! The 1911 was far superior to all other pistols being tested  in terms of ruggedness and resistance to hostile climates. It was the best of its time with the result that it served the American military from acceptance in 1911 until it was phased out in 1985. I say it was phased out, but that is only for general military use. The pistol continues to be used by special operations forces with the U.S. Marine Corps placing an order for twelve thousand M45A1 pistols (an upgraded M1911A1) in 2014. It turns out that the .45 caliber round is just too good at what it does to pass up for those who really need a sidearm. read more


What do YOU want?: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • In an air rifle
  • The marketing
  • Not my idea
  • Last visit
  • So what?
  • The $100 PCP
  • What do YOU want to see in an air rifle?
  • Over to you
  • Summary

In an air rifle

It was February 2006. I’ll never forget standing in the office of Crosman’s CEO, Ken D’Arcy after making my pitch about a single shot precharged pneumatic air rifle that only filled to 2,000 psi.  I was on fire that day, because Ed Schultz had taken my idea and in three days had prototyped two rifles — one in .177 and the other in .22. To his surprise — it worked! He had turned two Crosman 2260 CO2 rifles into prototypes of what the company would eventually call the Benjamin Discovery. [Note: Crosmnan has changed the rifle to a Sheridan 2260.] He was getting 20 shots at almost 1,000 f.p.s. in the .177 and he hadn’t even tweaked the valve yet! read more


Ataman AP16 Standard air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ataman AP16 Standard
Ataman AP16 PCP repeater.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

Adjustable sights
It doesn’t matter
The test
Sight in
Mount a dot sight
JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
Air Arms 16-grain dome
Air Arms Falcon pellets
JSB Hades
Loud!
Conclusions
Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Ataman AP16 Standard precharged air pistol. We learned in Part 2 that the AP16 Standard gets up to 46 good shots from one fill. I didn’t shoot that many in the tests today so I only filled the pistol once.

Adjustable sights

We know that the rear sight slides left and right in a dovetail and is held fast by a setscrew.  That’s easy to figure out. It’s the front sight that you need help with. There are no instructions in the manual and the front sight controls elevation by raising and lowering the blade. I told you in Part 2 I would tell you how to adjust it so let’s see. read more


Sharpshooter pistol resurrection: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sharpshooter pistols
The Bulls Eye pistol (left) came first. Manufacture started in 1924 in Rawlins, Wyoming. The smaller Sharpshooter pistols at the right were made in Rawlins until sometime during World War II, and then manufacture moved to La Jolla, California in 1946.

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • New parts!
  • My Sharpshooters
  • Unmarked guns
  • What the launcher does
  • How accurate?
  • John O. Beckwith
  • A full report
  • Launchers/slides/carriers are available
  • Summary

New parts!

A month ago I was contacted by reader George, whose great uncle, John Beckwith, produced the Sharpshooter pistols in La Jolla, California. George had read my Part 1 of the Sharpshooter report that was published in September of 2018 and he noticed what I said in one of the captions.

metal Sharpshooter launcher
The sliding launcher is what flings the shot from the pistol. The older Sharpshooters have metal launchers like this one that last for decades. This one is about 76 years old and still works fine. That flat metal piece on the right is the sear that also opens the in-line magazine to allow one shot to fall into the launcher when it is pushed up by the launcher.
read more


Slavia 618 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Slavia 618
Slavia 618.

Part 1
Part 2

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • H&N Match Green
  • Falcon domes
  • Gamo Match
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Summary

Today we test the Slavia 618 breakbarrel’s accuracy. I have described the rifle in Part 1, and in Part 2 we tested the velocity before and after it got a freshened breech seal. The one I’m shooting today could be considered a “hot” 618.

The test

I shot the rifle off a rest at 10 meters. Even though I tested 7 different pellets I shot 10-shot groups because the rifle is so light and easy to cock. Let’s get started.

RWS Hobby

The first pellet I tested was the RWS Hobby wadcutter. Right off the bat during sight-in I determined that the 618 does not like to be rested directly on the sandbag. I suppose it is so light that the force of the piston throws the rifle off target when it fires. The rifle is so small that it’s difficult to hold with the artillery hold, but I did the best I could. Ten Hobbys went into 0.91-inches at 10 meters. read more


Slavia 618 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Slavia 618
Slavia 618.

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Research
  • Model variations
  • What is the Slavia 618?
  • Comparisons
  • Stock
  • Summary

Some of you may have been hoping for Part 2 of the Beeman R10 rifle report today. Well, Part 2 will be the strip-down and installation of the Vortek tuning kit, and I need a couple days to do the work and take the pictures, as well as the writing. So today I’m starting my report on the Slavia 618 breakbarrel pellet rifle.

History

Guess what? Almost nobody knows the history of this air rifle. It has a lot of fans, but nobody seems to know much about it.

The Blue Book of Airguns says it was made in the 1970s — period. But they say the same thing about the Slavia 622. Well, I received one of those as a gift in about 1961 or ’62, so that’s obviously not right. read more