The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Hobby
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • RWS Superdome
  • Getting tired
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Something different
  • Summary

Today I will test the accuracy of my new/old Beeman P1 pistol.

The test

I shot from 10 meters and rested my hands on a sandbag, but the gun was hand-held. I held it with two hands for the greatest stability. My days of shooting perfect scores one-handed are about over. Instead of 10-shot groups I shot 5-shot groups, but I tried a lot more pellets than usual. I also did something neat at the end of the test.

Sight-in

When sighting in, I started out shooting on high power. The first pellet hit the target very low. I played with the sight adjustments until I got the pellets up into the bull, but a thought occurred to me. What if the pistol did better on low power? That might explain why there is a hesitation going past low power when cocking.

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Two action targets: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi Rockin’ Rat target: Part 1
Codeuce spinner targets: Part 1
Codeuce spinner targets: Part 2

This report covers:

  • Benjamin Wildfire
  • More powerful airguns needed
  • Enter Codeuce
  • The eyes again
  • Did very well
  • Codeuce spinners
  • Summary

Today I will finish my report on two different action targets we have been testing. First up is the Air Venturi Rockin’Rat. Part 1 of this review was way back in September of this year, but it goes back even farther than that. I had the Rockin’ Rat at the 2017 Texas Airgun Show, back in August. And I had created what I thought would be a fascinating way to show it to you.

Benjamin Wildfire

I took the Rockin’Rat over to John McCaslin’s house, to let him shoot at it with the Benjamin Wildfire. I figured seeing the target hit 12 times in rapid succession would be pretty impressive. I got all set up with my camera and John zeroed the rifle at the distance he would be shooting, so we were prepared to be amazed. The camera started rolling and John shot 12 times and — nothing! I felt bad for him, missing such an easy target from only 25 feet.

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Crosman’s Town and Country multi pump

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Town and Country
The Crosman Town and Country I tested was a model 108 in .22 caliber.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Town and Country
  • Was the Supergrade the influence?
  • Description
  • Front sight was a marvel!
  • Short pump lever
  • Velocity
  • Accuracy
  • Summary

When I was in the hospital for three months in 2010, my wife Edith kept this blog alive by publishing reprints of articles I had written for Airgun Revue magazine. One of those articles was the one I’m publishing today, with the difference being I am here now to edit my remarks and to lighten the black and white pictures.

Town and Country

A glance in the Blue Book of Airguns reveals that the Crosman Town and Country multi pump air rifle was made in 1949. That’s correct — ONE YEAR! Collectors debate whether it was also produced for a while in 1950, but the point is — this is one scarce airgun. And, look at that date again. What else was happening in the world of airguns, here in the U.S., in the late 1940s? Sheridan was making their model A, Supergrade!

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The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Lots of reports
  • What is the Beeman P1?
  • HW45
  • Three calibers
  • Good 1911 trainer
  • Two power levels
  • Adjustable sights
  • Adjustable trigger
  • All metal
  • PTFE piston seals
  • Overall evaluation

As I was packing up at the 2017 Texas airgun show a man stopped by my tables and showed interest in a BSA Airsporter I had for sale. He asked if I would consider a trade. He then showed me a Beeman P1 pistol in near-excellent condition. The only real detractor is someone had tried to mount a scope on it and they screwed a scope stop pin down into the top of the scope rail, leaving a mark. I already owned a P1, but my gun has been highly modified from the days of The Airgun Letter, and I welcomed this chance to test a stock one.

Back in 1996 I modified the trigger of my P1 and got an extremely light and crisp pull. Ever since then I have had to try to remember what the stock trigger felt like. Also, I have tuned my pistol, making it’s pretty far from the gun it once was. I like the P1 and have recommended it for years to shooters who are serious about air pistols that can shoot, but in all that time I have been talking about a stock gun that’s getting harder and harder to remember. With this trade I can rectify that!

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The Crosman 180: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 180
My .22 caliber Crosman 180 is the second variation.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Plywood
  • The test
  • Crosman Premier
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • RWS Superdome
  • Summary

Today I’ll test the Crosman 180 for accuracy. I’ll shoot it at 10 meters, rested. I don’t expect great accuracy because this was always intended to be a plinking rifle, but it’s probably not too shabby, either. There is no easy way to mount a peep sight or a scope. This is a, “Stand on your hind legs and shoot like a man!” airgun.

Plywood

I mentioned in Part 1 that the stock is made from a plywood product. Chris USA had a difficult time seeing that, so I promised to show him in Part 2. Well, I forgot. So, before I start today’s test, I took a photo of the stock.

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The Crosman 180: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 180
My .22 caliber Crosman 180 is the second variation.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The acquisition
  • Quick fix
  • 180 variants
  • Trigger
  • The 180 valve
  • Adjustable power
  • Description
  • Sights
  • Summary

The acquisition

When my wife Edith and I lived in Maryland (1982-2003) we often attended the Columbia Flea Market. Once each month they held a Super Sunday when the market would expand by 500 percent. That was the day all the occasional dealers would attend, and bring the stuff nobody had ever seen. I found some tremendous air gun bargains there! Maybe I will write a report on just that — the deals I found and the deals I passed up. Today, however, I am starting a look at a Crosman 180 that came from that market.

We had been attending for more than a year and I believe I had started writing The Airgun Letter, or was about to. Because I was used to seeing vintage airguns at this market I carried several CO2 cartridges in my pocket, just in case. On this day one stall had this Crosman 180 and a .177-caliber 187 for sale. As I recall they wanted $40 apiece. I asked if they held CO2 and of course the dealer didn’t know. Then I asked if I could try my cartridges and she said yes.

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Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider
Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Superdome
  • Experience pays off
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • The trigger
  • Next — the shocker!
  • Aiming error
  • Magazine
  • Final group
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Diana Stormrider PCP. I know that many of you are eagerly awaiting these tests to make an important decision. Let’s jump right in.

The test

I shot using open sights from 25 yards off a rest today for several reasons. First, the Stormrider comes with open sights and, while a scope has to be sighted-in which can take some time to do, a gun’s native sights should be pretty much on all the time. The second reason I trusted the sights is the rifle I’m testing is one Pyramyd Air put through many tests already. Surely they have shaken it down before sending it to me.

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