Air Venturi Match pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Air Venturi V10 pistol
Air Venturi’s V10 Match pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • The trigger
  • Sight-in
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Strange sound
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Qiang Yuan pellet
  • Summary

Today I shoot the Air Venturi V10 Match pistol for accuracy. Let’s get started.

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest that has no influence over this pistol because it is a pneumatic. I shot 5-shot groups because a target gun usually puts them so close together that 10 are hard to see.

The trigger

In Part 3 I tuned and adjusted the trigger on this pistol and I nailed it! This is the nicest Gamo Compact (the base gun) trigger I have ever used and I think my trick with relieving the wood around the adjustment screw is the difference. I could shoot a trigger like this in competition! read more


Air Venturi Match pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Air Venturi V10 pistol
Air Venturi’s V10 Match pistol.

This report covers:

  • Best-laid schemes…
  • Straightforward
  • How to dry-fire the V10
  • Lubrication
  • Moly
  • Test the trigger
  • Put everything back together
  • The fix
  • Summary

Best-laid schemes…

…o’ mice an’ men gang aft agley! The poet, Robert Burns, was right when he said that. I told you that I was going to show you how to lighten the trigger of the Air Venturi V10 Match pistol today, and I am. But in the past this has always been a simple 15-minute job. It should take me maybe 30 minutes with pictures. I had planned to do the accuracy test today, after finishing with the trigger. Nope! Instead I struggled for some time, and in the struggle I learned something valuable that I will now pass on to all of you.

Straightforward

The job I’m going to show you is straightforward. It should be easy for everybody, as long as you don’t stray past where I’m taking you. In Part 2 we left the trigger at between 2 lbs. 2 oz. and 2 lbs. 9 oz. pull. A 10 meter pistol trigger can be as light as 500 grams, which is 17.64 oz. or 1 lb. 1.64 oz. So, where we left the trigger was more than one pound too heavy. read more


Air Venturi Match pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Air Venturi V10 pistol
Air Venturi’s V10 Match pistol.

This report covers:

  • R10 Match Pistol
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion
  • Cocking/pumping effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Surprise!
  • What’s happening
  • Summary

I was surprised by the amount of interest the Air Venturi Match pistol generated in Part 1. A lot of you are interested in it, so besides reviewing it in the usual fashion I’m going to show you some things about this pistol and about single stroke pneumatics in general that aren’t widely known or discussed.

Today is velocity day, so I will begin there. Because this is a target pistol I’ll test it with target pellets. It’s rated to 400 f.p.s., so let’s find out what this one does.

R10 Match Pistol

I’ll begin with the RWS R10 Match Pistol pellet that is often extremely accurate in target air pistols and even in air rifles of lower power. In the test V10 they averaged 379 f.p.s. for 10 shots. The low was 377 and the high was 383 f.p.s., so a total spread of 6 f.p.s. Single stroke airguns are usually very stable, so this low spread is not surprising. At the average velocity this pellet generated 2.23 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. read more


Air Venturi V10 Match pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi V10 pistol
Air Venturi’s V10 Match pistol.

This report covers:

  • Why test the V10?
  • Description
  • Effort
  • Accuracy
  • Grip
  • Trigger
  • Dry fire
  • Sights
  • Construction
  • Left hand grips available
  • Summary

I had planned to start the accuracy test of the Air Venturi Seneca Aspen today, but I ran into too many issues while attempting to mount the scope. II will tell you everything that happened when that report runs.

So today a new airgun that was on my list was moved up. It’s the Air Venturi Match pistol. It’s a single stroke pneumatic that’s based on the Gamo Compact that I have tested in the past. But why test a target pistol at all?

Why test the V10?

Glad you asked. A couple years ago the Russian IZH 46M stopped coming into the U.S. and many airgunners regarded that as a major loss. Ten meter target pistols are on very few airgunners’ short lists, but whenever something is no longer available people do take notice. Most shooters consider a target pistol to be an expensive plinker with a good trigger. read more


2018 Pyramyd Air Cup: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Field Target meeting
A record 104 shooters receive their orientation briefing from Tyler Patner on the first day of the field target match.

This report covers:

  • The vendors – H&N
  • The vendors – Leapers
  • Public range
  • Gauntlet and Fortitude
  • Sig ASP20
  • More interesting airguns to come
  • Field target
  • Pistol match cancelled
  • World-class airguns
  • More to come

The Pyramyd Air Cup is a public event that combines airgun competitions, a public range, a chance to meet many of the vendors who make the airguns and accessories you read about and, most importantly, a chance to shoot airguns you have seen and heard about but could never try. A day at this event is worth a year of reading on the internet — this blog included.

The Cup was held at the Tusco Rifle Club in Midvale, Ohio, which is about midway between Cleveland and Columbus. It’s convenient to people living in a 500-mile radius, and this year I saw people from all over the U.S., including Florida, California and Hawaii. People had come from Canada and the UK, as well. The H&N general manager, Florian Schwartz, was there, and Tobias Schmidt represented Diana. Both men had come from Germany to be there. read more


The airgun market in 2018

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Serious airgunner
  • The market has exploded
  • No more cheap
  • The gun crisis
  • Where were airguns?
  • Firearm crossover
  • Airguns — cheap???
  • Is that all there is?
  • The future
  • The point?
  • Summary

When I started writing about airguns in 1994 there weren’t but about 5,000 to 15,000 serious airgunners in the U.S. No one knew for sure how many there were because there was very little data about this market. There may be disagreement on just how many there were but everyone agrees that the American airgun market was small.

Serious airgunner

Let me define what I mean by “serious airgunner,” because that has a bearing on what I’m saying. Airguns are very prevalent in the United States. I would estimate that millions of homes have at least one airgun, but that ranges from the family who just inherited their parents’ home and are unaware of the old Benjamin that’s stuck up in the rafters of the garage to homes like mine, where the number of airguns is greater than 50. There are a huge number of families with airguns, but most of those people cannot be considered serious shooters. My definition of a serious airgunner is someone who owns and shoots an airgun at least once each month. My experience is that if they do shoot an airgun that often, they shoot it a lot more than that! read more


Gamo Compact vs IZH 46: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This report covers:

  • Single Stroke Pneumatics
  • Velocity
  • RWS R10
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Accuracy test
  • RWS R10
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Chinese match wadcutters
  • Summary

Today is a mistake. Reader RidgeRunner asked me if I intended to finish this report from 2008. I looked at his link to Part 5 and, sure enough, it looked like I had intended to. I even promised a reader back then that I would. Well, WordPress software is at fault this time, because I did not find a later report when I entered it in the search box at the top of this page, but when I went to publish this report number 6 I found that one had already been published — on July 22, 2008. But that was after I did the complete test plus some extra things, so I’m going to finish it again. It’s actually a good report. And by the way, I just entered the title in the search box again and this time it came up. Of course it did! read more