How do you know…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • August’s question
  • Experience
  • How do you tell…
  • Expected power
  • Piston stroke
  • Age of the gun
  • Chronograph or other means of power determination
  • How do you know? — case 1
  • Case 2
  • Last point
  • The last word

Today’s topic tries to address a question I am sure many newer airgunners have at some point. How do you know when a spring gun need repair? It was asked last week by reader August, who lives in Germany. Here is what he asked.

August’s question

”How do I recognize that an older gun piston seal is going bad? From reading the blog I gather that I can chrony it. But this gun delivered until right before the final breakdown. Only the last five shots it became slower. On opening the gun I saw that the outer part of the plastic seal was detached from the rest and had blocked the spring tube probably causing the older spring to break.

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Colt Peacemaker BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Colt Peacemaker
The new Colt Peacemaker is also available with ivory grips.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading the gun
  • The test
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Plastic BBs
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Why accuracy before velocity?
  • Evaluation so far

It’s been a month since we first looked at the Colt Peacemaker BB revolver with the 7.5-inch barrel. In that time I thought about how I should test it for you. I think today’s test will be different and even exciting, because I am doing accuracy before velocity. I’ll tell you why as we go.

Loading the gun

We know this revolver accepts a 12-gram CO2 cartridge in the oversized grip. The grip is that of a Colt 1860 Army cap and ball revolver instead of a Single Action Army cartridge revolver, and is about one half-inch longer. It looks right on the gun, though, and feels fine. The wrench for the CO2 piercing pin is permanently attached in the left grip panel so it’s always at hand and installing the first cartridge went quick and easy.

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How many shots will an airgun get over its life?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Action airguns
  • Materials failure
  • Dielectric welding
  • Airguns with regulators
  • CO2 guns
  • Pneumatic airguns
  • Spring piston airguns
  • The lowly BB gun
  • But what is the number?
  • The point

This report is written at the request of reader redrafter. I made the title long, because it contains some things we need to think about. If an airgun is overhauled and gets new seals and springs, is that the end of its life? I don’t think so. What I am calling the end of an airgun’s life is when it no longer works and cannot be repaired with parts that are available. I say that because a careful worker can often extend the life of something beyond even that end. So, my definition of an airgun’s life is when there are no longer any repair parts that are easily available.

Action airguns

Let’s get these out of the way up front. Action airguns include the action pistols, submachine guns, revolvers and rifles that allow rapid fire like the Crosman 1077. As a class of airgun, these are the most likely guns to fail, and that is because of how they are intended to be used — i.e. rapid-fire most of the time. Within this group some guns have a reputation for early failure, while others, like the 1077, seem to last much longer than their synthetic materials would imply.

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Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor
The Air Venturil Rail Lock spring compressor is compact.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Attaches to scope rail
  • Enter the R8!
  • R8 out of the stock
  • Remove the Rekord trigger
  • Unscrew the end cap
  • Install the mainspring compressor
  • Removing the end cap
  • One last photo
  • Assembly
  • Evaluation so far

Today I start testing the new Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor. Many of you have expressed an interest in this tool, and I want to test it as broadly as possible, because all airguns are not made the same.

Attaches to scope rail

This compressor attaches to the scope rail on your airgun. It will work on both pistols and rifles — as long as there is a scope rail to attach to. It attaches to both 11mm dovetails and Weaver/Picatinney dovetails. The rails have to be close enough to the rear of the spring tube to allow the compressor to work, but that will become clear when you see the pictures.

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2017 Findlay airgun show: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Here we go
  • Wire-stock Daisy
  • What is Findlay?
  • 10-meter airguns
  • Sold some stuff
  • What about a big bore?
  • Were modern airguns there?
  • Toys, too
  • The Larc
  • There is more

Here we go

Yesterday’s report was just a lead-in. Today I want to tell you about the show. First — it was large. It was held in two rooms, with hallways and out-of-the-way nooks also being used. And every table was filled! This was a show you could spend many happy hours seeing just one time. And the tables changed over time, so your second time through things were different. People bought stuff from the public that attended, plus they brought out some of the stuff they didn’t unpack in the beginning. It was an all-day affair!

Findlay crowd
This is a long shot of the main show room. The floor of this room is an indoor soccer field, and it was filled!

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Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Hobbys
  • A couple observations
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Diana model 5 air pistol I’m testing, which is labeled a Winchester 353. We heard from several owners who like their pistols, so let’s see what this one can do.

The test

To get right into it, I didn’t know where the sights were adjusted. You may remember I mentioned that the rear sight was adjusted all the way over to the right. I decided to shoot the first group as the gun was set up. After that I could adjust the sights. All shooting was done from 10 meters with a 2-hand hold and my arms rested on a sandbag. I used a 6 o’clock hold.

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Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A valuable report!
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Oil
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • The oiling
  • Experience pays off
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Back to Hobbys
  • How is it doing?
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

Today’s the day I discover how healthy my new/old Diana model 5 (Winchester 353) air pistol is. This is best done with a chronograph, which is the Nth time I have told you that.

A valuable report!

Today’s test will be a valuable lesson in spring gun dynamics. Because of how I conducted it, this test shows things that are not often seen this clearly. Let’s begin.

RWS Hobby pellets

I wanted to know up front whether this pistol is in good condition or not. So I used the RWS Hobby pellet first. In my research for this report I found stated velocities for the Diana model 5 pistol between 375 f.p.s. and 450 f.p.s. Those numbers were no doubt obtained with a light pellet, and in the days that the model 5 was selling, lead pellets were the norm. I thought a lightweight lead pellet would have to give me the fastest average velocity. I was wrong, but let me tell you how the test went.

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