Benjamin 310 BB gun: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

Benjamin 310
A Benjamin 310 multi-pump BB gun from 1952.

This report covers:

  • How to test?
  • RWS Hobby
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • One pump
  • Another test
  • Fastest shot
  • Pellet tests coming
  • One final test
  • Summary

Today is our final day of looking at the velocity of the Benjamin 310 multi-pump BB gun. You will recall that the reason this has taken so long is because this gun is very flexible about the ammo it accepts. If it turns out to be accurate, this gun may well be an all-time best airgun to own — right up there with an FWB 124 and a Diana 27..

Today we will look at the velocity with pellets. Since the gun is smoothbore I don’t expect it to be accurate past 10 meters, but I will reserve judgement until we test it. If I get nothing better than 2-inches at that distance, though, I won’t be testing it at 25 yards. There are already enough holes in my walls and woodwork! read more


Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3 

Hatsan 135 30 caliber rifle
Hatsan’s .30 caliber 135 QE Vortex is a large breakbarrel — both in size and caliber.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact 44.75 grain
  • JSB Exact 50.15-grain
  • Predator Polymag
  • Next
  • JSB domes at 25 yards
  • Predator Polymags
  • Polymags with the tips removed
  • Summary

This Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle is full of surprises and today is no exception. I scoped it in preparation for a 50-yard test. Today was confirmation at 25 yards.

I installed an obsolete UTG 4-16X56 scope in a pair of BKL 300 High Rings. The 135 has an adjustable comb that I raised about 3/4-inches to align with the eyepiece. It was very comfortable, shooting that way.

This scope had been shimmed for an earlier test, so it was very close to on target when the test began. I only fired one shot at 12 feet and one more at 10 meters to get on target. Then at 25 yards I refined the scope with two more shots. read more


Benjamin 700 multi-pump repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

Benjamin 700
Benjamin 700 repeating BB gun.
This report covers:

  • How do they do it?
  • BB………….average diameter
  • Repeater
  • First test
  • Second test
  • Discussion
  • Next test — lead shot
  • Trigger pull
  • Safety
  • Summary

Today is Part 2 of the Benjamin 700 test and Part 2 is usually a velocity test. I will do that, but the nature of this very different multi-pump presents some interesting challenges. The biggest of these is the fact that this gun was designed to shoot more than one shot per fill. That puts several wrinkles into the test.

How do they do it?

To understand what I am up against you have to understand how a multi-pump pneumatic gun is able to get several shots on a single fill. Someone once told me that these Benjamins must have a small reservoir attached under the stock, and that is where they store the extra air. Without thinking about it, I assumed that was true, but it’s not on this gun. Nor does it need to be. ANY multi-pump air rifle or pistol can be set up to get multiple shots from a fill of air! read more


Crosman 105 “Bullseye” multi-pump pneumatic pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 105
Crosman’s 105 is a .177 caliber multi-pump air pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Two variations
  • Description
  • Markings
  • Power level
  • Trigger and safety
  • Cost
  • Irony
  • Reviving the pistol
  • Summary

Today we start looking at an airgun I have owned for probably 10-15 years. I wrote about it 11 years ago, but that was just an overview. It has been laying around in my air pistol collection and I haven’t given it much consideration until recently. Once I started looking at it, though, things happened fast. That’s a story in itself.

History

The Crosman .177-caliber 105 and .22-caliber 106 “Bullseye” multi-pump air pistols were produced from 1948 until 1953. The “Bullseye” name was changed to “Target Pistol” about a year after introduction. The .177 caliber pistol came out first, followed by the .22 some time later. This was Crosman’s first foray into multi-pump air pistols. The pistols operate via an underlever pump that’s shaped like the finger lever on a lever-action rifle. In fact, some collectors have been fooled into thinking they are lever action spring-piston guns because of this. read more


The importance of bullet-to-barrel alignment and fit: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why go to the effort?
  • Ten shots in 0.2-inches at 200 yards
  • So what?
  • Other airgun breeches
  • Always liked single shots
  • Summary

I am writing this report for a number of reasons. The main one is because all you readers are interested in accuracy, and today’s topic is an important component of that. Yesterday reader Vana2, who goes by the name Hank, asked me if the Daisy 499 could be converted to a magazine. Here are both his comment and my answer.

——————————————
Question about feed mechanisms and accuracy on the BB guns…
The 499 billed as the most accurate BB gun and it is a single shot muzzle loader.
Considering that steel BBs are not likely to be deformed in the magazine and they are held in position with a magnet, would there be any technical reason that the 499 could [not] be magazine fed?
Just seems that muzzle loading is a little inconvenient.
Welcome to July… Happy Monday!! 🙂
Hank
—————————————————
Hank,
That tight barrel is the reason for muzzle loading. Did you know that Harry Pope built his breechloaders to have their bullets muzzle loaded? It was for a different reason, but they were called muzzle loading breechloaders.
That said, I suppose a magazine would be possible. But target arms are typically single shot so I guess Daisy never saw the need.
If I hadn’t argued with them in the 1990s, they wouldn’t have ever sold the 499 to the public. They didn’t think people would pay the price, and were shocked by the response.
B.B.
—————————————————
When I told him that, I figured it would raise some questions, so today I want to discuss bullet-to-barrel alignment and fit, which in our world is pellet-to-barrel, most of the time. read more


The TexanSS: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TexanSS
TexanSS big bore air rifle from AirForce.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • First comments
  • Bubble Leveler
  • Collar Buttons are a no-go at 100 yards
  • 210 SWC is still a great bullet
  • Balle-Blondeau-talk
  • Balle-patent
  • Balle Blondeau
  • 355-grain flat point dogbone
  • Ton shoots at 100 yards
  • One more test

I had the Umarex Gauntlet out to shoot at 50 yards last week but the day was just too windy. Once I got it sighted-in for 50 yards the wind picked up and blew the pellets all around. I wanted this test to be a good one between the magazine and the single-shot tray, and it wasn’t going to happed this day. So I brought out the TexanSS that has no difficulty shooting in the wind.

Today I will show you how the AirForce TexanSS big bore performs at 100 yards. I have spent several days at the range to get today’s results. That’s why it took me so long. read more


Air Venturi Dust Devils: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Initial tests
  • Accuracy
  • Velocity
  • Feeding reliability
  • Unplanned test at the NRA Show
  • Hard targets with a BB gun!
  • Simple test
  • Serious test
  • Summary

This report has awaited the launch of the Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs. That happened last week, so they are now available to purchase. If you are a fan of BB guns, you need some of these!

Initial tests

I was sent a sample of these novel new BBs when they were still in the pre-production stage. The first thing I noticed was the broad band around the middle. It obviously has something to do with manufacture, but I wondered what affect it would have on accuracy and velocity stability, so those were the things I tested first. read more