Quality is not always straightforward

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Location, location, location!
  • Price point
  • Limited access to materials
  • Committee rule
  • Space is different — of course
  • Materials issues
  • Something different
  • Intermodal containers
  • Different perspective
  • The gamble
  • They approved the design
  • Real world
  • However…
  • Your comments
  • True story
  • Summary

The 5-part Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle series brought up a lively discussion of manufacturing quality. I have read the comments and feel compelled to mention a few things that no one has addressed yet.

I will be addressing some of the comments from readers in today’s report, but I am not doing it to argue with anyone. I just think we need to see all sides when we talk about this.

Location, location, location!

Does anyone not know that the TR5 is being made in China? It is. Many of you think the Chinese don’t care about quality and the last good thing they built was the Great Wall, but that’s incorrect. China makes most of the smartphones, computers, consumer electronics and optics that we have today. China also has a space program. They are only the third country to put humans into orbit (in their own space program) and they have plans for a Chinese space station next year. They even plan to walk on the moon! read more


Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TR5
Air Venturi TR5 repeating pellet rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • The test
  • First up
  • Stock
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • Heavier pellets were too long
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.53mm heads
  • Baracuda with 4.52mm head
  • Discussion
  • Baracuda Match 4.50mm the second time
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm the second time
  • Summary

Today we discover whether cleaning the barrel of the Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle makes any difference to the accuracy. I am going the extra mile on this airgun because it satisfies a large group of shooters who just want an accurate plinking rifle. No, it’s not a target rifle despite the name. But is it a handy and compact spring-piston plinker that sells for a reasonable price?

The test

I shot the rifle from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. I held the rifle in a non-artillery-hold way, with my off hand around the forearm. I had mounted the UTG Micro Reflex dot sight because I felt the rear sight notch might be a little too broad for the best accuracy. All groups will be 5-shot groups until I find a pellet that’s accurate. read more


Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TR5
Air Venturi TR5 repeating pellet rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Complex repeating mechanism
  • The test
  • Don’t do this
  • No barrel swap
  • Cleaning the barrel
  • Cleaning
  • Assemble the rifle — oh oh!
  • Which pellet to choose?
  • Sighting in
  • At 10 meters
  • Too much time
  • Summary

Today I clean the barrel of the Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle then mount the UTG Micro Reflex dot sight. I will sight in after that, but not shoot any groups in this report. You will understand why as you read this report.

Complex repeating mechanism

The TR5 has a very complex repeating mechanism. It’s practically identical to the repeating mechanism on the IZH 61 that it copies. Repeaters don’t usually offer good access to the breech, and this mechanism is particularly difficult to deal with. There is no room even for a flexible cleaning line or a bore snake. For me to clean the barrel of this rifle properly, the barrel had to come off! read more


Pioneer model BB76 BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Pioneer BB gun
Pioneer BB76 BB gun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • 1976
  • Getting ready to shoot
  • This is a big gun!
  • The firearm
  • And the key!
  • Look for them new in the box
  • Broken
  • Summary

I’ve got a strange one for you today. It’s a copy of a copy! This must be one of the strangest lookalike airguns ever made. And it copies a firearm that is itself just mimicking an era, without copying anything in particular.

1976

The American Bicentennial in 1976 was a gala year-long celebration. Grand parties were held and everyone was euphoric that the nation held together for 200 years. There were no end of special bicentennial commemorative items available. Even the airgun community had one — today’s topic gun, the Pioneer model BB76 BB gun. It is a 50-shot repeating spring-piston BB gun that cocks via a concealed underlever. It looks like a percussion rifle from a century earlier, and I think it was supposed to resemble a flintlock rifle of one additional century earlier. I guess most people don’t know the difference between a flintlock musket and a percussion rifle. read more


Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TR5
Air Venturi TR5 repeating pellet rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • A different day
  • The test
  • Get started
  • Artillery hold — no!
  • Heavy pellets?
  • Rear sight adjustment
  • The mess
  • Wassup?
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • What caused this?
  • Seen it before?
  • Discussion
  • Summary

A different day

Today’s blog will be different. Today you get to look behind the curtain and watch the wizard ply his tricks to try to fool Dorothy and her retinue. Today is accuracy day for the Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle, but as you will soon learn, it will be anything but!

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. I used both the artillery hold and rested the rifle directly on the bag, to see which was better. I’ll describe it as we go.

I shot 5-shot groups because I was looking for one or more pellets that are the best. We’ll soon see how that turned out! read more


Diana model 26 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 26
The Diana 26 air rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • This is a .177
  • RWS Superdome
  • Firing behavior
  • Trigger pull
  • No vibration
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Hobby
  • Barrel tension
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Summary

I asked in Part 1 for owners of Diana 26s to tell me of their airguns and I was surprised that so many responded. Apparently I was in the minority for not knowing about the Diana 26. From what they said and what I’ve read I have learned that the 26 was closely related to the model 28 that came out when the model 27 ended production. So models 23, 25, 27 and 35 went away and models 24, 26, 28 and 34 came into being.

The model 34 is a whole story on its own, that I will cover one day, but not today. This report came about because I wanted to get a model 35, to see if I could tune it to be as smooth and light-cocking as a 27 and have a little more power. I got the 35, which is an early rifle with some very curious features, but I also acquired this model 26 and a model 27S that’s equally unusual. We are looking at the 26 in this series, so that’s where the focus will remain today. read more


Tuning BB’s Diana 27: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Teardown
  • 25 years?
  • Krytox!
  • Petroleum archaeology!
  • Grease to oil
  • Spring is fully scragged
  • Grease formed plugs and solidified
  • Start cleaning
  • Removing the barrel
  • Surprise!
  • Piston out
  • And rust!
  • Diana peened the blind pin in the piston head!
  • Cleaning done, time for the Krytox
  • Lubed the mainspring
  • Assembly
  • The rest of the parts go in
  • Finishing assembly
  • The verdict
  • Did I do it wrong?
  • What should I do now?
  • Don’tcha wanna know how it works?
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Summary

Today is the day we learn whether Krytox is the miracle lubricant that both fixes and quiets spring-piston airguns. I have been hounded by people for more than a decade to try this stuff, and I had dug my heels in real deep, but then it dawned on me that Gene from Pyramyd Air had been after me for an equally long time to try Almagard 3752 — the grease that turned out to be Tune in a Tube. We all know how that went!

I promised to become the number one Krytox cheerleader if the stuff really works as advertised — by some airgunners, not by Krytox, themselves. But, I will also be only too happy to poke a hole in the Krytox balloon if it turns out we have been hoodwinked. read more