Daisy Number 12 model 29 single shot BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 model 29 single shot BB gun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The gun
  • Hough front sight
  • Loading
  • The BB changed from lead to steel
  • Getting 0.175-inch lead shot
  • Darts, too!
  • Summary

Sometimes we like things for reasons that make no sense to others, though we know why. Today’s report focuses on a BB gun that I have liked for many years, after discovering late in life that it existed at all.

The gun

Daisy’s Number 12 Model 29 is a lever action BB gun with a difference. It looks older than it is. It resembles a Daisy model H that was made from 1913 to 1923. The strangest thing about the model H is the cocking lever, which catches your eye immediately. In many respects these guns look similar to the more common BB guns we know today, but that cocking lever seems strange. I have not read an explanation for why it looks like it does, so allow me to posit a guess — leverage. read more


Daisy Model 99 Target Special: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

Daisy 99
Daisy Model 99 Target Special.

This report covers:

  • Leather seals
  • Back to the 99
  • Velocity Daisy BBs
  • Velocity Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Velocity Air Venturi Dust Devils
  • More on the Dust Devil
  • Other BBs
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far
  • Coming up

Today is velocity day for the Daisy Model 99 Target Special and I have prepared for it. When I started Part 1, I oiled the gun with a healthy dose of Crosman Pellgunoil. The synthetic piston seal on the plunger (in a BB gun the piston is called a plunger) needs the oil to seal the compression chamber. Lack of oil in a BB gun will cause temporary low power until the seal is oiled. Then the gun will return to life and act like new. It happens so fast and dramatically that it will surprise you the first time you encounter it.

Leather seals

Older BB guns had leather plunger seals that take longer to renew — maybe 15-20 shots. But they do come back in the same way after oiling. The oil needs time to soak into the seal. The most dramatic example of this I ever saw was an 1880s BB pistol that my wife Edith bought at a flea market in the late 1990s. After a breech plug was fashioned for it the gun shot like it did when new, only the spring and leather seal were at least 110 years old. If that isn’t surprising I don’t know what is! read more


Daisy Model 99 Target Special: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Daisy 99
Daisy Model 99 Target Special.

This report covers:

  • Not what I expected
  • Peep sight
  • Front sight
  • Sling
  • Action
  • Stock and forearm
  • Gravity-feed magazine
  • Forced-feed magazine
  • Three variations of the Model 99
  • 99 accuracy
  • Daisy 299
  • Comparison to the 499
  • Summary

Welcome to July! Today I thought I would start looking at the Daisy Model 99 Target Special that I acquired at the recent Texas airgun show. I know reader RidgeRunner is anticipating this report and perhaps others are, as well.

For the readers who are awaiting the next Diana model 23 rifle report, know that I am working on it in the background and hope to have something for you very soon.

And I learned something very important this weekend. Daisy also sold lead shot for the Targeteer. It was obviously number 6 birdshot, and it makes perfect sense, because it would have been far cheaper than heading steel wire to make steel shot. Just buy the shot and repackage it. We know it works, and it probably works better than the steel shot. The tubes of shot I bought from Ebay were all lead shot. I felt cheated until I did the research and discovered lead was also correct. The learning never ends. Now let’s look at the Daisy 99 Target Special. read more


Daisy Targeteer shooting gallery: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Maintenance
  • Success!
  • Lead shot is not consistent
  • Sorting shot
  • Loading technique
  • BB rollout
  • Velocity
  • Accuracy testing
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Maintenence

The last time I looked at the Targeteer I lubricated it with a lot of Crosman Pellgunoil. How many drops, you ask? Maybe 50. It’s still oily a week later, which a BB gun needs to be, to work its best.

paper
I just thought you would like to see the cover of the manual.

Success!

And they all said — whaaaat?

A couple readers knew I was having problems getting either of my two Daisy Targeteer pistols to shoot. I was working on the problem, but last week I was stumped. Fortunately this ain’t my first rodeo and I finally remembered what I used to do.

Lead shot is not consistent

We know that lead birdshot is not of consistent size, regardless of how it is made. That had to be the problem. When I looked through the barrel I saw nothing. There should have been light shining through, so the barrel was plugged. I found something to ram through the barrel — turned out to be one of those thin plastic spray tubes that come with many aerosol cans. Remember — this Targeteer is .12 caliber, not .177! read more


Air Venturi Dust Devils: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Initial tests
  • Accuracy
  • Velocity
  • Feeding reliability
  • Unplanned test at the NRA Show
  • Hard targets with a BB gun!
  • Simple test
  • Serious test
  • Summary

This report has awaited the launch of the Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs. That happened last week, so they are now available to purchase. If you are a fan of BB guns, you need some of these!

Initial tests

I was sent a sample of these novel new BBs when they were still in the pre-production stage. The first thing I noticed was the broad band around the middle. It obviously has something to do with manufacture, but I wondered what affect it would have on accuracy and velocity stability, so those were the things I tested first. read more


The Right Now pellet and BB trap

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier*

This report covers:

  • The project
  • Attach the pan to the board
  • Now the duct seal
  • Finished trap
  • Put trap inside a box
  • Time?
  • Bottom
  • Future of the trap

I know that many of you readers are craftsmen, so today’s blog may disturb you a bit. You see, old BB is going to build something. I had a problem and found a very good (read that as cheap) way to solve it. I call it the Right Now pellet and BB trap.

One of the pastors at my church has a 9 year-old son who is very interested in guns. He’s a shy kid until he starts talking about guns. Then his eyes light up and he gets excited. I feel like I am looking at myself, threescore years ago.

I have been giving the boy my old gun magazines and he is soaking them up like a sponge. I also gave him a couple gun books that he and his father read together. His dad is not a gun guy, either, so I’m really working with two pupils here. read more


Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy 499
  • Colt Single Action Army
  • Loading problems
  • Red Ryder
  • Conclusions
  • Summary

On Monday I got my right eye laser cleaned, so now it is back to as good as it will get. That means I can start doing accuracy testing again. For today’s report I tried the AirVenturi Dust Devil frangible BBs in three BB guns with three different feeding systems.

The test

I shot at 5 meters seated and used the UTG Monopod as a shooting rest. I shot five shots per target only because this test was very long. Let’s get started.

Daisy 499

The first gun was the Daisy Avanti Champion 499, which we know is the world’s most accurate BB gun. With this gun I used Avanti Precision Ground shot, because it is made especially for the gun. The use of any other premium BB in a 499 is a waste of time and money, because only this shot allows the gun to do what it does. Predictably, five BBs went into a group that measures 0.202-inches between centers. The group is high and left of the bull, so I must have bumped the rear sight. But I did not adjust the sight during the test. read more