The Walther LGV Olympia – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The Walther LGV Olympia is a beautiful breakbarrel spring-piston target rifle from the 1960s.

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of my Walther LGV Olympia target rifle. I told you in Part 1 how serendipity brought me to this rifle and what a find it was. Of course, this one has been tuned, just like they all have by now. Walther was one of those companies that used an improper formulation for its piston seals in the 1960s and ’70s; and as a result, all the original seals have dry-rotted. At the very least, all the guns should have been resealed.

This particular rifle was resealed and was supposed to be shooting on the hot side. Back when it was a new rifle, 650 f.p.s. was considered the right velocity for a 10-meter rifle. Today, it’s more like 550-590 f.p.s. So, this vintage target rifle is faster than a lot of today’s world-class target rifles. read more


The Walther LGV Olympia – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


The Walther LGV Olympia is a beautiful breakbarrel spring-piston target rifle from the 1960s.

Well, the Roanoke Airgun Expo starts today, so while you read this, Mac and I will be buying, selling and looking at airguns. I will take pictures to show you, of course.

So, there I was, on the morning of October 5, reading my October 4 blog, “A safe strategy for no-loss — mostly gain — airgun collecting — Part 1,” when I came to the embedded link to the Yellow forum classified ads. Since I always check the embedded links in blogs, I clicked through and immediately came upon an ad for a Walther LGV Olympia target rifle in great condition for $425. What? Are they going to be selling Harleys in crates left over from World War II next? read more


A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 – Part 9

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 8
Part 7
Part 6
Part 5
Part 4
Part 3
Part 2
Part 1

Getting ready to test
Today, I want to mount a scope on the 124 to get ready for the long-range accuracy test. Normally, I would just mount the scope and gloss over it in the report, because scope mounting is usually not a big deal; but the 124 is a special airgun that needs special scope mounting considerations. So, I’m making a separate report about it.

A strange scope stop
What makes the 124 special is the way Feinwerkbau went about providing a scope stop. You must understand that Feinwerkbau is a target gun company. They understand rear aperture sights very well, but they don’t appreciate scope sights nearly as well. And, in the 1970s — when the 124 came out — scope mounting was still very new to the hobby. They provided a scope stop system that works well for rear aperture sights but not so easy when working with scopes. read more


A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 – Part 8

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 7
Part 6
Part 5
Part 4
Part 3
Part 2
Part 1

Okay, you were very patient; so, today, I’ll show you the early results of pellet testing with the FWB 124. Remember, this testing is done with open sights at 10 meters, and it was done just to narrow the field of the new pellets that will compete with the vintage Silver Jets at 25 yards from a scoped rifle. You can’t really test a rifle’s accuracy potential at just 10 meters unless it’s a 10-meter target rifle.

Before we begin, though, I must thank Volvo for these pellets. Earlier this year, he generously donated several tins of odd and exotic pellets to my collection. Among these were several boxes of Beeman Silver Jets. So, thanks to him we are able to have this test series. read more


Lead-free target pellets – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

I think this will be a super-big series, because the times seem to demand it. Lead has been demonized so much that the Junior Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (JROTC), a high-school training component of the U.S. military, has now encouraging the use of lead-free pellets for all marksmanship training using airguns. So, the question is, are lead-free pellets accurate? Can they compete with lead pellets in a formal competition situation?

I have to say that, at this moment in time, no lead-free pellet that I’m aware of can possibly compete against top-quality lead pellets. I’m not the expert, of course, but I have tested enough of these pellets to know their limitations. However, if the world is going to go in that direction, what I know or feel doesn’t matter. read more