Gamo’s Silent Stalker Whisper IGT air rifle: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

There’s a new video on Airgun Academy: All about lasers. Click to watch it.

Part 1
Part 2


Gamo Silent Stalker Whisper IGT is lightweight and looks to be a fine hunting air rifle.

If I could subtitle today’s report, it would be Making Lemonade. Because that’s what was in the box with the rifle — a real lemon of a scope! And to compound the issue, the rifle is a super drooper and the scope rings Gamo provides have no droop compensation. So, they’re unusable.

I actually tested the rifle last week and planned to report on it while I was at the Roanoke show, but the scope is so fuzzy that at 25 yards I could not see the bull clearly enough to aim. Had I been shooting at 10 yards, I wouldn’t have any problem with a fuzzy scope, because I know Gamo had to keep down their costs on this package. But this is where it really helps to have some knowledge of the product before you put combo packages together. This airgun is perfect for shooting at 25 yards, yet the scope is unusable at that distance when the power is dialed up to nine. So — you don’t put a variable scope on this gun! Package it with a 4x scope, save a little money and the shooter will never be able to see how out-of-focus it is. Maybe you could add a drooper mount from the savings, because this rifle really needs one. read more


Gamo’s Silent Stalker Whisper IGT air rifle: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier


Gamo Silent Stalker Whisper IGT is lightweight and looks to be a fine hunting air rifle.

Part 1

Okay, this is the week of the Roanoke airgun show. I’ll be on the road from this Wednesday until the following Tuesday, and I’m asking you veteran readers to help the newcomers with their questions. I’ll still read the blog each day, but it’ll be only during a short period in my motel each evening. Edith will be at home and will continue to monitor the blog and the comments and contribute as needed.

Today, we’re going to look at the velocity of the .22-caliber Gamo Silent Stalker Whisper IGT we’re testing. I said “Wow!” a lot in Part 1, so I certainly hope that sentiment carries forward in today’s test. read more


Tech Force TF89 Contender breakbarrel: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Before we start, Edith has some announcements about some new promotions at Pyramyd Air.

Guys and gals…Halloween isn’t even here, yet, but I’m going to tell you about some early Christmas shopping ideas that will save you some money and get you some free goodies. For starters, you can get some free clips when ordering the Walther PPK/S CO2 BB pistol.

Want a free rechargeable flashlight? Get one when you order one of these Umarex CO2 guns. The really neat part about this flashlight is that it plugs into your vehicle’s cigarette lighter and stays there, charging while you drive. Turn off the car, and it stops charging. Click here to read about this clever little flashlight. Keep the flashlight for yourself or save it for a Christmas gift. read more


How spring-piston rifles behave

by B.B. Pelletier

Okay, Grasshopper, enough Wax on! Wax off! It’s time to use your skills.

If you’ve been following the discussions over the past month about accuracy, you should now have the tools to be a pretty good judge of the potential accuracy of an air rifle and the relative ease with which that accuracy comes — even before taking the first shot. We’ll confine today’s discussion to just spring-piston guns, since they’re the most difficult to shoot.

How a spring-piston airgun works
This is a review for many of you, but we have enough new readers that perhaps it’s good to go over the points of how the spring-piston gun works. What I’m about to say holds true for guns with gas springs as well as guns with coiled steel mainsprings. They all work the same when it comes to their operation. read more


.22-caliber Browning Gold air rifle: Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


Browning’s Gold breakbarrel is a beautiful new spring-piston rifle.

Well, Mac has returned home and left me to finish this report on the Browning Gold breakbarrel by myself. Some wonderful things have happened and I’m going to write another part to this story tomorrow, only I will not link it to this report, because it applies to general airgunning.

What’s happened has come about in many parts. First, we had a comment on Facebook where I was asked if I really meant to include firearms in my comments on the Artillery Hold video. I definitely did, because target shooters use essentially the same hold when they shoot from a bench, if they want to get the best groups. They call it “follow-through” and I call it the artillery hold, and when we use it we are doing many things at the same time. Well, today’s report brought that out as few past reports have, because the Browning Gold is very sensitive to hold. read more


Tech Force TF89 Contender breakbarrel: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Tech Force Contender TF89 is a large, powerful breakbarrel spring rifle.

Today, we’ll look at the power of this .177-caliber TF89 Contender. The rifle is advertised at 1,100 f.p.s., and today we’ll see if that’s true. I tested a TF89 air rifle back when they first came out; although that report is no longer available online, I remember saying lots of nice things about this air rifle.

Cocking effort
This breakbarrel has a long arc to cock the long-stroke piston and you feel it all the way. It takes a peak of 42 lbs. of effort to cock the test rifle, though most of the way through the stroke it was just under 40 lbs. When the rifle was brand new, I could feel a dryness to the powerplant, accompanied by a squeaking sound during cocking. That went away during the velocity test, but the barrel still does have a hesitation spot about at the midway point through the barrel arc after the rifle is cocked. Through that arc, the barrel will remain wherever it’s put, but outside that hesitation spot the barrel is loose and floppy. read more


Tech Force TF89 Contender breakbarrel: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


Tech Force Contender TF89 is a large, powerful breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report is a poignant one for me, because I also tested one of the first TF89 Contenders that came to this country. That was for the Compasseco website back in 2003, and I still remember that rifle. I said that the Chinese were finally nipping at the heels of Weihrauch, and that the Beeman R1 had reason to be concerned.

It’s now eight years later and the .177-caliber TF89 Contender I am looking at today (serial number 08638455) isn’t quite the same gun I saw in 2003. For starters, when I took this gun from the box, it was covered in thickened oil that had to be removed. I haven’t seen that in many years. A quick spritz of Ballistol over everything, followed by a thorough wipedown with a cotton rag removed the old oil and got the rifle to a clean, dry state; but it was something I haven’t had to do in a long time. read more