Sam Yang Dragon Claw .50 caliber big bore air rifle: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The Dragon Claw from Sam Yang is a .50 caliber big bore air rifle.

Today, I’ll test the velocity of the Sam Yang Big Bore .50 caliber Dragon Claw single-shot air rifle. For this test, I used two Air Venturi bullets and a swaged round ball that are available from Pyramyd Air.

The rifle is supplied with a probe-type quick-disconnect fill device, and I can finally report that the Koreans have now conformed with the rest of the world in supplying these adapters with standard threads that attach to common 1/8″ BSP fittings. In the past it was a chore matching these adapters to hoses you might have on hand (if you’re already into PCP airguns). read more


Sam Yang Dragon Claw .50 caliber big bore air rifle: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Today, I’ll begin our look at Sam Yang’s Big Bore .50 caliber Dragon Claw single-shot air rifle (serial number 3526). The rate these new big bores are being made is stunning! I remember when Dennis Quackenbush first offered the Brigand — a .375 caliber roundball shooter that ran on CO2. It was 1996, I believe, and there simply were no other modern big bore air rifles around at the time. Oh, that’s not entirely accurate. There were a few boutique makers producing a handful of guns, many of which were “engineered” so close to the edge of disaster that shooters risked their lives every time they filled them. read more


Beretta 92FS CO2 pistol with wood grips: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2


The 92FS with wood grips is a big, beautiful handgun. With its weight and size, you’ll be hard-pressed to imagine that it’s an air pistol.

Today is accuracy day, when we see how well this Beretta 92FS air pistol can shoot. Let’s get right to it.

The range was 30 feet, and I shot 8 rounds per target because of the clip capacity. I also did an interesting experiment that may impress you. All shots are holding with two hands and off a rest. The gun never touched anything but my hands.

Sight-in
The pistol shot high and right at 30 feet, so I had to move the rear sight slightly to the left to compensate. The job went quick because once the Allen screw is loose, the sight moves easily in its dovetail. There was no solution to the high shooting, of course. This is with a six-o’clock hold on the 10-meter pistol bull. read more


Beretta 92FS CO2 pistol with wood grips: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The 92FS with wood grips is a big, beautiful handgun. With its weight and size, you’ll be hard-pressed to imagine that it’s an air pistol.

Today, we’ll test velocity on this Beretta 92FS wood grip air pistol, and I’ve incorporated one or two extra things into the test. But first things first.

Installing the CO2 cartridge
I said in the last report that I’d show you how the CO2 cartridges load into the gun. Today’s the day for that. To open the grip for a CO2 cartridge, just press in on what looks like the magazine release on the left side of the gun. That pops off the right grip panel, and you have access to load the cartridge. read more


Beretta 92FS CO2 pistol with wood grips: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


The 92FS with wood grips is a big, beautiful handgun. With its weight and size, you’ll be hard-pressed to imagine that it’s an air pistol.

Okay, time to look at an airgun you can actually buy, if you’re so inclined. We’ve certainly been reporting on a lot of vintage guns recently — and I love them, but there’s also the real world to consider.

The Beretta 92FS is the latest iteration of the Beretta 92F, which is the civilian equivalent of the U.S. military sidearm, the M9A1. It’s a 15-round 9x19mm semiautomatic pistol that replaced the M1911A1 beginning in 1988. I won’t go into the controversy of the choice of 9mm over .45 ACP caliber for a handgun, which has been argued at length for the past 50 years, but I’ll be comparing the 92FS with the 1911A1 in terms of ergonomics and performance. And, I’m doing that only because I come from a background of the 1911 model. read more


Physical science and the airgunner

by B.B. Pelletier

Announcement: Before we begin today’s report, here are some special products for you handymen. Pyramyd Air has removed the adjustable buttpads from broken stocks of some high-quality guns. They’re offering these pads for a fraction of what a new adjustable pad would cost. There are two styles. One with a flat face and one with a curved face. These are great for hobbyists who are skilled in woodworking. They’re not kits and do not come with instructions.

One thing I’ve tried to pass along in this blog is the importance of physics to an airgunner. If you’re a new airgunner, I suggest that you open your mind to several of the important physical relationships that dominate our hobby. read more


Crosman 116 CO2 pistol

by B.B. Pelletier

Today, we have a guest blogger. Paul Hudson has done other guest blogs for us; and true to form, he’s been very thorough. This blog is about the Crosman 116, which is a great vintage gun that’s the father of the Crosman 150. I’d say this is the ultimate test, as he tried 18 different pellets!

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We’ll edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors. read more